Tires, Mileage vs Age - Pontiac Solstice Forum
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post #1 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-03-2013, 08:57 AM Thread Starter
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Tires, Mileage vs Age

Just wondering what the current theory is regarding tires mileage vs tires age. The 09 is coming up on 5 years but car mileage is around 7K. I'm assuming that regardless of mileage there comes a point that its recommended that tires be replaced?

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post #2 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-03-2013, 09:53 AM
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That’s a good question Dan!

I found this article that talks about it and gives recommendations by the car companies. GM declined comment until a scientific study is done. (And in my opinion that’s the right answer).

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete...jsp?techid=138

Personally from my experience working around different types of machines, the absolute worst thing you can do is let a piece of equipment just sit. The oil seeps out of bearings leaving metal on metal contact. The rubber compounds in belts and drive mechanisms dry out, causing them to lose elasticity. The contacts in the electrical system deteriorate.

I drive my coupe at least once a month. In the winter I wait for a sunny day where the roads are dry and drive it several miles to get everything working properly. Then take it out onto the expressway starting at about 50 miles an hour and when I feel the tires get round (they get flat spots just from sitting and it’s easy to hear), then I take it up to 70 miles per hour and drive for about 20 miles.

I might be crazy, but it does justify being able to drive my car once a month.
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post #3 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-03-2013, 09:58 AM
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It also depends on the tires and storage conditions. Cool, dark garage is a lot better than in direct sunlight

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post #4 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-03-2013, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by ChopTop View Post
Just wondering what the current theory is regarding tires mileage vs tires age. The 09 is coming up on 5 years but car mileage is around 7K. I'm assuming that regardless of mileage there comes a point that its recommended that tires be replaced regardless of mileage?
Absolutely! I can pretty much guarantee if you changed those 5 year old tires with the exact same size, brand and model tire you would be amazed at the difference in ride and handling. Those tires are hard, and the ride and traction is nowhere near what it was 5 years ago. The worst example of this is Michelin tires. They usually have very high wear ratings on all their tires. The reason for this is they use a very hard, or dry rubber. Find a set of Michelin tires that's 5 or more years old on a car and look at them closely. They'll have all kinds of little cracks in the sidewalls. All tires do this, I've just noticed that Michelin's do it more. I've seen many, many Michelin tires replaced because they were badly cracked, but had plenty of tread.

I know I'm talking a lot about a different brand tire than you have, but it's the same on all tires. They DO get "old" from just sitting. The ride gets harder and the traction goes down. Buy a set of new tires and you will be posting about how amazing the difference is! The stock tires on our cars weren't that good when they were brand new. (I personally think they're horrible.) If you don't need all season tires, I would STRONGLY recommend Continental DW's. NOT DWS's, those tires are downright dangerous on dry pavement.

BTW you should probably go out and do some donuts with those old tires before you get rid of them! We've been working on destroying the tires on the CTS-V wagon for awhile now since I'll be putting new tires on any day now. I'd have a hard time doing smokey burnouts on $2k worth of new tires!
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post #5 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-03-2013, 10:19 AM
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I do not have a problem leaving tread life on the street!

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post #6 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-03-2013, 10:25 AM
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I do not have a problem leaving tread life on the street!
Oh HELLS yeah! My brother and his family were following us home from dinner a couple months ago. I laid about 100 feet of rubber in front of him and the smoke was so thick he literally had to stop and wait for it to clear so he could see the street! Those marks are still there, they'll probably be there for a long time! D@mn tires aren't worn out yet though. lol.
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post #7 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-03-2013, 11:48 AM
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Just wondering what the current theory is regarding tires mileage vs tires age. The 09 is coming up on 5 years but car mileage is around 7K. I'm assuming that regardless of mileage there comes a point that its recommended that tires be replaced regardless of mileage?
Yes, you are correct -- tires should be replaced after a certain age, regardless of mileage.

Although I cannot quote a specific reference, the figure of 7 years seems to stick in my mind.

As a real world example, when my mother got a new car and gave us her nine year old one. the tread was great, maybe 10,000 miles. All was well until the first time we were on an interstate and it started to rain. Doing anything over 50 mph led to extreme instability, quite scary. I attributed this to the tires being too old, nothing to do with alignment or balance, as a new set of tires alone cured the problem.
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post #8 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-04-2013, 06:55 AM
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Dan,

Carter is dead-on with the 7-yr rule; and that means 7 years from manufacture, not usage.
I recently took Shadow to the tire shop for it's semi-annual rim cleaning and resealing and they couldn't do the job because the tire was dry rotted. I had about 42,000 miles on the last two original tires (had two replaced last year) and they still had decent tread on them, but it was time for them to go.
I bought my car, an 07, new in August of '08, but the tech said that the tires were 7 years old (I think there's a date on them somewhere). I HAD noticed all of the hairline cracks in the sidewalls the past couple of months.
The good news is that after I got the new tires and had my rims cleaned that I haven't had to add any more air since (I was losing about 15 psi daily on the one tire).
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post #9 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-04-2013, 07:42 AM
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So, I am checking the literature

Tires are manufactured by bonding rubber to fabric plies and steel cords. And despite the anti-aging ingredients mixed into the rubber compounds, there is a realization that tires are perishable, as well as a growing awareness that some tires will actually age out before their treads will wear out.

For the most part today's tires deliver more miles and years of service than ever before. In the 1970s, typical bias ply tires lasted less than 20,000 miles and were only expected to be in service for about two years. In the 1980s, early radial ply tires offered a treadwear expectancy of about 40,000 miles during four years of service. And by the turn of the century, many long-life radial tires extended treadwear to about 60,000 miles during four or more years of service. While passenger car and light truck tire technology and American driving conditions in the past resulted in tire treads wearing out before the rest of the tire aged, it may not always be true of today's even longer lasting tires that are approaching 80,000 miles of treadwear.

How many years will tires last before aging out? Unfortunately it's impossible to predict when tires should be replaced based on their calendar age alone.

The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and tire manufacturers are currently studying the many variables. Exposure to the elements (sun and atmospheric), regularity of use (frequent or only occasional) and the quality of care (maintaining proper inflation pressure, wheel alignment, etc.) will all influence the answer. So while tire life depends on the service conditions and the environment in which they operate, the difficult task remains how to identify all of the variables that influence a tire's calendar age and attempt to quantify their influence.

The current industry association recommendations regarding inspecting and replacing tires due to age originate outside the United States.

The British Rubber Manufacturers Association (BRMA) recommended practice issued June, 2001, states "BRMA members strongly recommend that unused tyres should not be put into service if they are over six years old and that all tyres should be replaced ten years from the date of their manufacture."

"Environmental conditions like exposure to sunlight and coastal climates, as well as poor storage and infrequent use, accelerate the aging process. In ideal conditions, a tyre may have a life expectancy that exceeds ten years from its date of manufacture. However, such conditions are rare. Aging may not exhibit any external indications and, since there is no non-destructive test to assess the serviceability of a tyre, even an inspection carried out by a tyre expert may not reveal the extent of any deterioration."

More recently, The Japan Automobile Tire Manufacturers Association (JATMA) recommended practice issued May, 2005, states "customers are encouraged to have their vehicle tires promptly inspected after five years of use to determine if the tires can continue to be used (recommends spare tires be inspected as well). Furthermore, even when the tires look usable, it is recommended that all tires (including spare tires) that were made more than ten years ago be replaced with new tires. Additionally, because in some cases automobile makers--based on the characteristics of the relevant vehicle--stipulate in the owner's manual the timing of tire inspection and replacement. Please read and confirm the content of the owner's manual."

Several European vehicle manufacturers of high performance sports cars, coupes and sedans identify that "under no circumstances should tires older than 6 years be used" in their vehicle owner's manual. However, it should be noted that European recommendations must include driving conditions that include roads like the German Autobahn, which allows vehicles to be legally driven at their top speeds for extended periods of time.

While American driving conditions don't include the high-speed challenges of the German Autobahn, Chrysler and Ford Motor Company joined their European colleagues in 2005 by recommending that tires installed as Original Equipment be replaced after six years of service. (General Motors declined to offer a recommendation until a more scientific analysis of driving conditions and tire aging could be completed).

It is important to take into account Original Equipment tires are mounted on wheels and put into service right after being received by vehicle manufacturers, so their calendar age begins immediately. However the same cannot be said of tires properly stored in a tire manufacturers' warehouse or in Tire Rack distribution centers before they go into service. Properly stored tires that are protected from the elements and not mounted on a wheel age very slowly before they are mounted and put into service.

Our experience has been that when properly stored and cared for, most street tires have a useful life in service of between six to ten years. And while part of that time is spent as the tire travels from the manufacturing plant to the manufacturer's distribution center, to the retailer and to you, the remainder is the time it spends on your vehicle.

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post #10 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-04-2013, 08:03 AM
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from Tire RAck

Several European vehicle manufacturers of high performance sports cars, coupes and sedans identify that "under no circumstances should tires older than 6 years be used" in their vehicle owner's manual. However, it should be noted that European recommendations must include driving conditions that include roads like the German Autobahn, which allows vehicles to be legally driven at their top speeds for extended periods of time.

While American driving conditions don't include the high-speed challenges of the German Autobahn, Chrysler and Ford Motor Company joined their European colleagues in 2005 by recommending that tires installed as Original Equipment be replaced after six years of service. (General Motors declined to offer a recommendation until a more scientific analysis of driving conditions and tire aging could be completed).

It is important to take into account Original Equipment tires are mounted on wheels and put into service right after being received by vehicle manufacturers, so their calendar age begins immediately. However the same cannot be said of tires properly stored in a tire manufacturers' warehouse or in Tire Rack distribution centers before they go into service. Properly stored tires that are protected from the elements and not mounted on a wheel age very slowly before they are mounted and put into service.

Our experience has been that when properly stored and cared for, most street tires have a useful life in service of between six to ten years. And while part of that time is spent as the tire travels from the manufacturing plant to the manufacturer's distribution center, to the retailer and to you, the remainder is the time it spends on your vehicle.

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post #11 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-04-2013, 08:04 AM
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While most drivers' past experience might not indicate it's necessary, the growing realization that tires are perishable means tires on some vehicles will possibly age out before they wear out. Composed of steel belts, fabric plies and rubber compounds, the structural integrity of tires can degrade over an extended period of time as the result of chemical reaction within the rubber components, cyclic fatigue, abuse and road hazards.

Tire aging isn't typically an issue with vehicles driven frequently, however the lower annual mileages put on sporadically used motor homes, enthusiast vehicles driven for pleasure and collector cars trailered to events could make tire calendar age an important consideration. Tire age is also a concern for the often unused spare tire in a car's trunk, suspended under a pickup's cargo bed or hung off the back of an SUV.

Unfortunately no one is absolutely sure of how long tires will last because of the many variables. Heavily loaded tires on vehicles stored outdoors in sunny, scorching hot climates and only driven occasionally face some of the most severe service conditions and potentially have the shortest calendar lifespan. In contrast, lightly loaded tires on vehicles parked in garages and driven daily in moderate climates experience some of the least severe service conditions and potentially have the longest lifespan.

Then there is the influence of how well drivers maintain their tires (regular cleaning and pressure checks along with periodic rotations and wheel alignments), use and/or abuse them (drive on them when overloaded or underinflated), as well as the possibility of irreversible damage from punctures, cuts and impacts with potholes, curbs and other road hazards. A tire's original durability will be permanently compromised if it is uncared for, abused or damaged.

Therefore every tire's life expectancy ultimately depends on the environment in which it operates and its individual service conditions. The difficult task remains how to attempt to quantify tire life based on calendar age. Arbitrarily replacing tires prematurely based simply on age may result in tires being discarded before their time, contributing to increased operating costs, as well as waste disposal and recycling concerns.

Since Tire Rack sells tires manufactured in North and South America, as well as Europe, Africa and Asia, it's common for us to receive new tires directly from manufacturers that are already six to nine months old. Since we rotate our inventory, most of the tires we ship are less than a year old.

However some low volume tires in sizes for limited production vehicles can only be efficiently manufactured periodically where one short production run may produce more than a year's worth of global supply. In some of these cases, Tire Rack might receive new tires directly from the manufacturer that are already several years old.

There are also some occasions where we work with a tire manufacturer to help them clear out their inventory when they discontinue a tire line. While this may uncover some new tires that are several years old, these clearance tires are typically offered at a discount and will wear out before they age out.

Tires are stocked in Tire Rack distribution centers under favorable storage conditions. Protected from exposure to direct sunlight, moisture and hot and cold temperature extremes, our inventory leads a sheltered life compared to the tires mounted on wheels, installed on vehicles and exposed to the elements, road grime and brake dust.

Tire manufacturer's replacement tire warranties begin when the tires are purchased and typically last 4 to 6 years from that date. This allows the tire manufacturers' limited warranty to accommodate the time it takes tires to be shipped from the manufacturing plant to the warehouse or distribution center, to the retailer and to the consumer, as well as the time they spend in-service on the vehicle.

Keeping tires properly inflated is probably the most significant action a driver can take to prevent tire failure. For example, driving a vehicle with a significantly underinflated tire can permanently damage the tire's internal structure in ways invisible to external visual inspections. A U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) tire aging field study revealed that 30 percent of spare tires observed were significantly underinflated when first checked, Putting underinflated spare tires into service before being properly inflated would greatly increase their risk of catastrophic tire failure. The inflation pressure of spare tires should be checked monthly along with the rest of the set.

Vehicles equipped with a full-size matching wheel and spare tire should use the vehicle's five-tire pattern at every tire rotation. Not only will this prevent the spare tire from sitting idle, it will keep all five tires' tread depths roughly equivalent throughout their life and extend the tire replacement intervals (if rotating four tires would result in 40,000 miles of service, including the full-size matching wheel and spare tire into the rotation pattern would result in 50,000 mile replacement intervals).

The NHTSA tire aging field study also indicated a strong correlation of the speed rating with tire durability, with higher speed-rated tires losing the least capability with increasing calendar age. Drivers living in hot climates may want to consider purchasing higher speed rated tires than those that came as Original Equipment.

Our experience has been that when properly stored and cared for, most street tires have a useful life in service of between six to ten years. And while part of that time is spent as the tire travels from the manufacturing plant to the manufacturer's distribution center, to the retailer and to you, the remainder is the time it spends on your vehicle.

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post #12 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-04-2013, 08:09 AM
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From Discount Tire

Replace Old Tires Even if There is Tread Remaining
•Vehicle Manufacturers Recommend Replacement at 6 Years
•Tire Manufacturers' Warranties Expire at 6 Years
•Tire Manufacturers Recommend Replacement at 10 Years
•Industry Experts Recommend Replacement at 10 Years


Certain chemicals added to new tires allow rubber to be soft and flexible. Over time and as air migrates through the tire, the chemical's effectiveness weakens, allowing rubber to become more brittle and lose strength.

Consumer Advisory: Factors to Consider in the Life of Your Tires

The following elements each play an important part in your tire's safety. Throughout the life of the tires it is necessary to see how each of these plays a different role. Excludes trailer tires.

Up to 6 Years:

Visual tire inspections and monthly air pressure checks are recommended.
•Tire Quality/Construction: Features and Benefits help to describe capabilities of tires during this period.
•Service Conditions/Maintenance: Rotate tires every 6-8,000 miles, check air pressure monthly and check tire balance every 12-16,000 miles. Tire Manufacturers suggest most tires are out of service at 3-4 years based on wear.
•Tire Wear/Condition: Less than new tread changes traction and stability capabilities in extreme weather conditions (such as: snow, ice, rain, dirt/mud).
•Environmental Conditions: Exposure to heat and ultraviolet rays may cause structural changes in the tire not found in more moderate climates.
•Tire DOT Number*: Tire age is not the major consideration during this portion of the tire's life.

6 to 10 Years:

Replacement is recommended.
•Tire Quality/Construction: Are more valid concerns as some tires are designed to be nearing the end of their service life based on average consumer travel of 12-15,000 miles annually.
•Service Conditions/Maintenance: Tires that have not been serviced or maintained properly are typically at the end of their service life.
•Wear/Condition: Less tread reduces traction and stability in all weather conditions as well as propensity to punctures.
•Environmental Conditions: Exposure to heat and ultraviolet rays causes ozone/weather cracking and structural changes.
•Tire DOT Number*: Now, one of the important considerations as some vehicle manufacturers recommend replacement and tire manufacturer warranties expire.


More Than 10 Years:

No service on tires with a DOT beyond 10 years.
•Tire Quality/Construction, Service Conditions/ Maintenance, Tire Wear/Condition, Environmental Conditions: Regardless of all of these conditions, tires reach the end of their life.
•Tire DOT Number*: Tire age is the most important consideration during this portion of the tire life as tire manufacturers recommend replacement of any tires regardless of service, including spares.

*Department of Transportation Number is stamped on the sidewall of every tire. The last group of digits indicates the week and year the tire was built.

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post #13 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-04-2013, 08:32 AM
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Cooper Tire Recommendation

http://us.coopertire.com/CooperTires...lletin_112.pdf

The useful life of a tire is a function of service and storage conditions. For each individual tire, this service life is determined by many elements such as temperature, storage conditions, and conditions of use (e.g., load, speed, inflation pressure, impacts and road hazard damage) to which a tire is subjected throughout its life. Since service and storage conditions vary widely, accurately predicting the service life of any specific tire based on calendar age is not possible.

Cooper Tire is not aware of scientific or technical data that establishes or identifies a specific minimum or maximum service life for passenger and light truck tires. However, Cooper recognizes a consumer benefit from a more uniform, global industry-wide approach to the tire service life issue. Accordingly, Cooper recommends that all tires, including full-size spares, that are 10 or more years from their date of manufacture, be replaced with new tires. Tires 10 or more years old should be replaced even if the tires appear to be undamaged and have not reached their tread wear limits. Most tires will need replacement before 10 years due to service conditions. This may be necessary even if the tire has not yet reached its tread wear limits.
Under no circumstances should a “maximum” service life recommendation for a tire be considered as an “expected” service life. Tires must be removed from service for several reasons, including tread worn down to minimum depth, signs of damage (cuts, cracks,bulges, impact damage, vibration, etc.) or signs of abuse (under inflation, overloading,
improper repair, etc.).

In some cases a vehicle manufacturer may make a recommendation for tire replacement earlier than 10 years for their products based upon their understanding of the specific vehicle characteristics and application. If so, the consumer should follow those vehicle manufacturer’s specific recommendations for their vehicle.

A tire’s date of manufacture is located on each tire. A consumer can determine the date of manufacture by examining the series of letters and numbers called the Tire Identification Number (TIN) which follow the letters “DOT” on the tire sidewall. For tires manufactured after the year 1999, the last four numbers of the TIN identify the week and year in which the tire was manufactured. The first two numbers identify the week and the last two numbers identify the year of manufacture. Thus, a TIN ending
with “3005” indicates that the tire was made during the 30th week of 2005 and would appear as DOTXXXXXXX3005 on the sidewall of the tire.
For tires manufactured prior to 2000, three numbers instead of four indicate the date of manufacture. The first two numbers reflect the week and the last digit reflects the year of manufacture. Thus, a TIN ending in 308 indicates that the tire was made in the 30th week of 1998 (or possibly 1988) and would appear as DOTXXXXXXX308 on the sidewall of the tire.

Consumers have the primary responsibility for the regular care and maintenance of their tires. Tires should be inspected at least once per month. The regular inspection should focus on proper inflation pressure, tread wear and tire/wheel damage as detailed below. Having tread depth above the legal limit does not determine the service life of a tire. Tires must be properly maintained and routinely inspected for continued safe and proper use — even when tread depth remains. Tires may need to be taken out of service even
when tread depth above the legal limit remains. Regular inspection becomes particularly important the longer a tire remains in use. This monthly inspection should be supplemented by periodic rotation, balancing and alignment services. Inspection should occur whether or not the vehicle is equipped with a tire pressure monitoring system.

Tires should always be stored in a dry, cool, well-ventilated place. Avoid storing tires in areas that are exposed to wetness, petroleum or petroleum-based products, extreme temperatures, direct sunlight, and/or other sources of ozone, such as electric motors. Storage areas should also be clean and free of grease, gasoline or any corrosive chemicals which can deteriorate rubber.
If a vehicle is fitted with a matching full-size spare tire the consumer should follow the vehicle manufacturer’s recommendation for rotating the spare tire. In the absence of a manufacturer’s recommendation, Cooper recommends a five tire rotation, including the spare tire. When any spare tire is placed into service, its inflation pressure must be checked.
Besides monthly inspection of their tires’ visual condition, consumers must also be aware of any change in dynamic performance such as increased air loss, noise or vibration. These conditions could be caused by internal damage to the tire and may require that the tire be removed from service immediately to prevent a tire disablement. Cooper recommends that consumers consult a tire service professional if any dynamic performance issues are noted.

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post #14 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-04-2013, 08:36 AM
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And finally . . . .

For more information contact:
Dan Zielinski
(202) 682-4846
dzielinski@rma.org

WASHINGTON, D.C., May 23, 2006 - A comprehensive study of more than 14,000 scrap tires shows that chronological age alone cannot determine when a tire is removed from service.

The Rubber Manufacturers Association inspected tires at seven large scrap tire processors in seven states and recorded the tires’ date code and tread depth as well as whether the tires had been repaired or had any visible damage. The study data has been shared with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

RMA initiated the study late last year. In June 2005, RMA wrote to NHTSA urging the agency to examine whether a relationship existed between a tire’s safety performance and its chronological age. In the letter, RMA also agreed to work with the agency to provide information about chronological tire age.

“We believe that a good starting point for a discussion about chronological age and tires was to examine tires that had been removed from service,” said Laurie Baulig, RMA general counsel.

RMA’s scrap tire survey examined more than14,000 tires that had been removed from service. The date codes on the tires showed that the survey sample contained tires from one to sixteen years old. If chronological age was a determining factor in tire performance, the data would have shown a spike of tires removed from service after a particular time.

“If age was a sole factor in determining tire service life, our data would have shown a significant number of tires being removed from service at a particular point,” Baulig said. “Our data showed no magic date when tires are removed from service.”

Other study observations included:
◦42 percent of tires in the study were removed due to wear-out (had tread at or below tread wear indicators). After the first year of service, 59 percent of tires in the study were removed due to wear-out.
◦25 percent of the tires had road hazard damage.
◦17 percent of the tires had been repaired.
◦Alarmingly, 87.5 percent of the observed tire repairs were improper – not performed with a plug and internal patch as specified by RMA tire repair guidelines.

The RMA scrap tire study encompassed 14,271 randomly selected tires observed at seven scrap processing facilities in five geographic regions of the country. The seven sites were located in Arizona, California, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, Oregon and Pennsylvania. Trained tire technicians from RMA member companies painstakingly observed approximately 2,000 tires at each site and recorded manufacture date code, tire wear and any visual damage or tire repair.

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post #15 of 41 (permalink) Old 11-04-2013, 08:41 AM
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I conclude from all the above that you need to inspect your tires regularly for cracking or signs of deterioration due to aging processes and environmental exposure.

And that the tires need to be maintained well over the course of their lifespan

And finally, if you do not observe any signs of deterioriation, including reduced performance which could indicate hidden problems, then tires should be replaced when you are comfortable that they have hit their life span.

My personal opinion is that 10 years is a safe figure for tires that are not showing signs of deterioriation, are well maintained, stored in controlled conditions and are not driven at very high speeds - over 100 MPH for an extended period.

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Green Dragon's chief mechanic
Carol's husband for 48 years

Secretary Rocky Mountain Solstice and Sky Club
Punisher's story
http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f62/punisher-65168/
Punisher thread index
http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f...ml#post1765649

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