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I am very happy with my automotive fossil 41U – mysterious black coupe. One of 414 coupes (Non-GXP) remaining two have made their fate may they R.I.P. and 849 GXP coupes left 1 was having electrical/engine issues, problem couldn't be repaired so GM bought it back. These numbers were taken from this forum unknown of the accuracy.
 

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Question; Why is it that our car critics (USA media) have had a hand in helping to destroy a car, only afterwords do they start releasing positive articles about them? :toetap:
 

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The non-automotive U.S. media has always seemed to have a varying degree of sway against the domestics. It was well deserved in the 60's and 70's as the U.S. makers were cranking out anything they could sell and the public was consuming them. Once people took a hard look at what Japan was starting to put out a couple decades after WWII they realized the U.S. had fallen way behind.

I think it's starting to turn around after a couple of decades past the time when Japan was handing our asses to us. The automotive media was very aware of the improvements made by the domestics and by the mid to late 90's they pointed out that the differences in quality and reliability (as well as innovation) were becoming so slight as to be practically imperceptable by the public. I see more press from the mainstream that seems to acknowledge that fact.

All told, anything written negatively about a vehicle I really like will definitely catch my attention! As the saying goes, you'd never pay attention to an article about the building that DIDN'T catch on fire.
 

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I do not agree w/this part of the statement; "suffered from a serious case of bad packaging. When the top was down, there was barely enough room for a toothbrush in the trunk."

Warning :rant:

Granted, when the top is stored valuable storage space is lost. However, what they always seem to miss is that by GM deciding to design the Kappa's convertible top to store away that it left a clean an uncluttered deck lid which didn't screw-up it's view of the humps. Or maybe a better way of saying it is that GM choose form over function, but it was due to that decision that the rear deck lid is clean and uncluttered looking (along with seemingly sparking a few other car companies to begin designing humps into their deck lids :rolleyes:).

Nope you can't store two sets of golf clubs, a weeks's supply of groceries, and two weeks supply of luggage for two in the trunk. However, GM did offer a deck lid luggage rack, along with a console storage bag. Plus Kappasphere produce(s) a slick convertible storage system for that toothbrush they are being so anal about. Why auto writers continue to B&M that this sports car should also be able to do double-duty as an SUV is beyond me.

Where was all this negativity at the 2002 Detroit Auto Show when the concept car was meant with instant applauded by the automotive press, or if GM does build it you can be sure it won't be as beautiful as the concept car.

They did, it was, STFU & deal with it.
 

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Ya know, Lowlife, you shouldn't sugar coat things. You need to come right out and tell us how you really feel.

;)
 

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I agree completely with LowLife1, I bought mine for the exact reason it wasn't practicle. I saw the car at the NY auto show and loved the design and then the recession hit and plans to buy were postponed for awhile. I came across one of the preproduction coupes made for GM managment and snagged it about two years ago. They will have to pry my fingers off the steering wheel when they bury me and I still won;'t care about the size of the trunk.

Beck's beer sells a wonderful four pack of 18oz cans which solves the storage space problem for a regular six pack! I think that is the end of all arguments about indequate storage space.
 

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Nope you can't store two sets of golf clubs, a weeks's supply of groceries, and two weeks supply of luggage for two in the trunk. However, GM did offer a deck lid luggage rack, along with a console storage bag. Plus Kappasphere produce(s) a slick convertible storage system for that toothbrush they are being so anal about. Why auto writers continue to B&M that this sports car should also be able to do double-duty as an SUV is beyond me.
Come'on, be real. I love my GXP as much as anyone but I also concede that the storage is A ****ING JOKE! EVERY OTHER sports car can get a regular sized suitcase in the trunk. I can't even get a Bud 18 pack of bottles in there. Yes, you can cram all your stuff into a couple of 8" wide by 8" high bags, but those writers (as well as normal people) are not looking for SUV storage, they're looking for normal day to day storage.

Bob
 

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The non-automotive U.S. media has always seemed to have a varying degree of sway against the domestics. It was well deserved in the 60's and 70's as the U.S. makers were cranking out anything they could sell and the public was consuming them. Once people took a hard look at what Japan was starting to put out a couple decades after WWII they realized the U.S. had fallen way behind.

I think it's starting to turn around after a couple of decades past the time when Japan was handing our asses to us. The automotive media was very aware of the improvements made by the domestics and by the mid to late 90's they pointed out that the differences in quality and reliability (as well as innovation) were becoming so slight as to be practically imperceptable by the public. I see more press from the mainstream that seems to acknowledge that fact.

All told, anything written negatively about a vehicle I really like will definitely catch my attention! As the saying goes, you'd never pay attention to an article about the building that DIDN'T catch on fire.
The '60s had some GREAT cars - the '64 Chevy Impala SS was gorgeous. The '67 Mustang fastback was awesome, and then there was the '63 Corvette Split Window. hmmmmmm . . . gotta disagree with you about the cars of the 60s. I do, however, agree somewhat about the cars from the 70s. But wait - the 70 Chevelle was one helluva car. . . . dang, I guess I just like some cars from all decades. :)
 

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The music died in 1972 with smog regs and by the next year, many of the existing models were up[ for replacement anyway in the normal run of these things. All of the 1970s products were pale shadows of what had taken place in the 60s.

As far as handling went for American cars, that wasn't really a goal until the 80s.

American car makers have always been about marketing and making the public want to buy whatever crap they had to sell, and any idea of actually creating an interesting capable car came from designers within the companies whose aspirations were usually throttled at birth. Lots of interesting prototypes, not many really interesting production models.

They had to sneak the Fiero through as an economy car, and it took them 4 years to sneak a decent suspension under it, at which point they pulled the plug before they could implement the planned turbo version. Corvette has been titillating the public with mid-engined show cars for 30 years but when they had a platform they could have easily adapted for that, they jammed (again).

I look on the 88 Fiero and the Solstice as exceptions to the vast sea of mediocrity, where for a limited time, a car enthusiast was allowed to build something interesting to sports car fans. Today, nothing there for us at all.
 

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Also what has to be remembered is frames. Back in the day most vehicles had full body perimeters length frames to support the body of the car of top of them. Once manufacturers turned to the unibody system the body had to also be designed and engineered to carry the associated loads that a full body frame allowed (along with the additional space). For example; on old 2-seat sport cars that used body on frames you could almost use the rear area to stick a couple of small dead bodies in. On modern ones a rear bulkhead is engineered directly behind the front seats to stiffen the body which obviously cuts into it's storage amount, ability, and versatility.
 

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The music died in 1972 with smog regs and by the next year, many of the existing models were up[ for replacement anyway in the normal run of these things. All of the 1970s products were pale shadows of what had taken place in the 60s.

As far as handling went for American cars, that wasn't really a goal until the 80s.

American car makers have always been about marketing and making the public want to buy whatever crap they had to sell, and any idea of actually creating an interesting capable car came from designers within the companies whose aspirations were usually throttled at birth. Lots of interesting prototypes, not many really interesting production models.

They had to sneak the Fiero through as an economy car, and it took them 4 years to sneak a decent suspension under it, at which point they pulled the plug before they could implement the planned turbo version. Corvette has been titillating the public with mid-engined show cars for 30 years but when they had a platform they could have easily adapted for that, they jammed (again).

I look on the 88 Fiero and the Solstice as exceptions to the vast sea of mediocrity, where for a limited time, a car enthusiast was allowed to build something interesting to sports car fans. Today, nothing there for us at all.
Fortunately, the Canadian Auto Industry had much better success.
 

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Fortunately, the Canadian Auto Industry had much better success.
Not so you'd notice. The Canadian car industry, aside from the subsidiaries of the big American companies, consisted of a few oddballs like the Bricklin and the Manic GT, both failures.
 

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Come'on, be real. I love my GXP as much as anyone but I also concede that the storage is A ****ING JOKE! EVERY OTHER sports car can get a regular sized suitcase in the trunk. I can't even get a Bud 18 pack of bottles in there. Yes, you can cram all your stuff into a couple of 8" wide by 8" high bags, but those writers (as well as normal people) are not looking for SUV storage, they're looking for normal day to day storage.

Bob

My wife and I would take four-day weekends in my '06 convertible (I have an '09 coupe now) without any problem. We used soft luggage, including a large duffel bag. She never complained about not having room for her stuff.

Three disclaimers:
1. She's a light packer
2. We're used to packing a motorcycle.
3. On the way to our destination, we never had the top down until we got there and unpacked the car... (I don't like a lot of sun, and she didn't like the wind)

I will admit, it's much easier to pack the coupe.

My point is, though, any tightly-focused car like a Solstice is going to have quirks and foibles. You either love the car and learn to live with it, or you don't.
 

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The solstice is a beautifull car hands down:thumbs:. That said, storage is tight for a long weekend. There are ways around it, pack light, pull a trailer:( (I've seen it done) Plenty of storage for a day of fun in the sun!:yesnod:
 

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The solstice is a beautifull car hands down:thumbs:. That said, storage is tight for a long weekend. There are ways around it, pack light, pull a trailer:( (I've seen it done) Plenty of storage for a day of fun in the sun!:yesnod:
My wife and I recently took a 12 day trip in the Solstice. Granted, on the way there and the way back we needed to have the top up, but we'd be traveling that way anyways, as there's a limit to the amount of wind beating you can take on a day's drive.

To each their own, YMMV.

:rofl:
 
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