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Regarding vanity plates, and I think Formula88 will know what this meant, my vanity plate on my 1984 Feiro was P-CAR . ;)
 

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flaj said:
Regarding vanity plates, and I think Formula88 will know what this meant, my vanity plate on my 1984 Feiro was P-CAR . ;)
Plastic Car?
It certainly isn't p-car as in the Dodge Shadow / Plymouth Sundance platform. LOL
 

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P was the carline designation.

M is the carline designation for the Solstice.

(A was the Ciera/6000 car, B was the old BOF Caprice/Roadmaster, J is the old Cavalier/Sunbird(fire)/Firenza/Skyhawk(FWD)/Cimarron, N is the old Grand Am/Skylark/Calais-Achieva, L is the old Corsica/Beretta that used to be made in the same plant as the Solstice/Sky).

P was also sort of related to the line codename within GM. Originally, the Fiero was called the "Pegasus", and you still see the top view of the winged horse in the Fiero emblem. I don't recall why they decided not to call it the Pegasus and called it "Fiero" instead...
 

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SolsticeMan said:
P was the carline designation.

M is the carline designation for the Solstice.

(A was the Ciera/6000 car, B was the old BOF Caprice/Roadmaster, J is the old Cavalier/Sunbird(fire)/Firenza/Skyhawk(FWD)/Cimarron, N is the old Grand Am/Skylark/Calais-Achieva, L is the old Corsica/Beretta that used to be made in the same plant as the Solstice/Sky).

P was also sort of related to the line codename within GM. Originally, the Fiero was called the "Pegasus", and you still see the top view of the winged horse in the Fiero emblem. I don't recall why they decided not to call it the Pegasus and called it "Fiero" instead...
I still have that license plate hanging in my playroom. To me it will always be the P-CAR. I followed that car for so long prior to it's introduction that Fiero seemed like a pseudonym . Its also interesting to note that 136,940 Fieros were sold the first year of its introduction and in 1988 it was canceled because they needed to sell 50,000 a year to make them profitable. Now consider that they will only sell 7,000 Solstices this year and only expect to ramp up to 20,000 a year at full production. The numbers don't seem to add up.
 

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flaj said:
Regarding vanity plates, and I think Formula88 will know what this meant, my vanity plate on my 1984 Feiro was P-CAR . ;)
Good one! My plates read FFORMULA ;) I have also seen a car that is identical to mine around here with plates that read 88FORMLA (limited to 8 characters in NY)
 

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SolsticeMan said:
Originally, the Fiero was called the "Pegasus", and you still see the top view of the winged horse in the Fiero emblem. I don't recall why they decided not to call it the Pegasus and called it "Fiero" instead...
I have a story on why they went with the name change somewhere.... if I can find it when I get home I'll post it.
 

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Fformula88 said:
I have a story on why they went with the name change somewhere.... if I can find it when I get home I'll post it.
Please do. :)
 

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SolsticeMan said:
P was the carline designation.

M is the carline designation for the Solstice.

(A was the Ciera/6000 car, B was the old BOF Caprice/Roadmaster, J is the old Cavalier/Sunbird(fire)/Firenza/Skyhawk(FWD)/Cimarron, N is the old Grand Am/Skylark/Calais-Achieva, L is the old Corsica/Beretta that used to be made in the same plant as the Solstice/Sky).

P was also sort of related to the line codename within GM. Originally, the Fiero was called the "Pegasus", and you still see the top view of the winged horse in the Fiero emblem. I don't recall why they decided not to call it the Pegasus and called it "Fiero" instead...
You forgot the two most important platforms... F (Camaro/Firebird) and Y (Corvette/XLR) ;)

Hmmmm.... those platforms kind of look bad abbreviated next to each other. Let's go with Fiscal Year :)

(more platforms)
 

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flaj said:
Regarding vanity plates, and I think Formula88 will know what this meant, my vanity plate on my 1984 Feiro was P-CAR . ;)
That's a pretty easy one...
 

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Drex said:
You forgot the two most important platforms... F (Camaro/Firebird) and Y (Corvette/XLR) ;)

Hmmmm.... those platforms kind of look bad abbreviated next to each other. Let's go with Fiscal Year :)

(more platforms)
Especially if you say it out loud: F 'n Y.

Ontario radio station my mechanics listen FM96 (95.9 London) I wonder as they seem to say FN and they do throughout the day say FN (effen) alot. The FCC stops at the border and they seems to be more lenient and a little more wild on the radio.
 

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SolsticeMan said:
I don't recall why they decided not to call it the Pegasus and called it "Fiero" instead...
flaj said:
Please do. :)
Here is the rest of the story on how the Fiero got it's name. This is an excerpt from "Fiero: Pontiac's Mid Engined Sports Car" written by Gary Witzenburg.

Fiero said:
Yet, fairly late in the program [P-car ie Fiero development], no one could agree on what to call the car. "Sprint" had been one possibility. The designers and a lot of other Pontiac people favored "Pegasus", an old Pontiac showcar name. One designer in Bill Scott's studio, Jon Albert, even took it upon himself to create an emblem showcasing the winged horse from Greek mythology. Jon's design was so good that it eventually became the P-car's badge even though the Pegasus name didn't fly.

Pontiac rejected Pegasus, according to Bill Hoglund [Pontiac division General Manager], because most people mispronounced the name. They put the accent on the second syllable (peg-GAS-us) instead of the first syllable (PEG-gas-us). "So then we had a big, huge name study" relates Hogland, "and finally came up with Sunfire. We figured we had the name!"

"Then one day I got a call from a janitor at the assembly plant named Calvin Queen. He told my secretary he wanted to talk to me about the Sunfire. I said fine, and went over there. He came in-this was when they had a prototupe there and were doing some [corporate] selling on it-and I said "What did you want to talk to me about?"

"Calvin said, It's the greatest car, but everybody thinks the Sunfire name is awful. I asked him, What's wrong with it? It's old-fashioned, he said, and that car is too new and fun and fresh to have that tired old Pontiac name on it. Okay, I said, any suggestions? No. Well, why don't you have a survey here in the plant? So they did, but the names that came back weren't a heckuva lot better. And only guys who liked the name Sunfire were the salesmen, because it had Pontiac recognition. It sounded Pontiac. [Keep in mind this is 12 or so years before the J-body Sunfire debuted in 1995].

"Finally, we said, Okay, let's set up a meeting. Bring in every name you want, and we won't leave the room until we can all agree on one name."

Before that meeting took place, though, Pontiac chief designer John Schinella came up with the name "Fiamma." "It means first love of the heart; flame; excitement in Italian" he relates, "One night Sergio Pininfarini, the Italian designer, was in town. I showed him slides of the car and a list of Italian names and, after much discussion and a sorting out of phonetics, we felt that Fiamma best suited the spirit of the car.

"Everybody liked it until they took it to the dealer council, and then Bill lane and Hoglund called me and said, John, we just can't use that name. The dealer council doesn't like it at all. I said, what's the matter with it? Lane said, they think it ought to be Firebird XP, or something similar. I felt that would take away from the Firebird. They said, well, have you got any other names? I told them I'd get to work on it right away."

"Being somewhat discouraged, but also knowing the great team spirit and camaraderie between Bill Hoglund, Bull Lane, and the studio, it gave me renewed energy to press on. In the studio, we all felt that an Italian name was very appropriate, especially with a few of us being of Italian descent. That next Saturday, while thumbing through the Italian dictionary at home, my wife, Roxann, came into my home studio and asked why I was so quiet. I replied that we'd lost the Fiamma name, and I mentioned that some of us were disappointed, but we still wanted to pursue a new Italian name.

"Then almost immediately, I tripped on the word "fiero"! I said, Hmmm, that sounds interesting. My wife asked what it meant. I told her, It means very proud and we both agreed that this was the right name.

"Hoglund was about to have a this big meeting to decide on a name. I called it The Last Supper, because we were all going to go into this room, about 12 of us, and lock the door, and we couldn't leave until we had a name."

"Before the meeting, I started calling some of my supporters. Hulki [Aldikacti, head of engineering] didn't seem to care one way or the other, although he want4ed a Turkish name. Jim Fitzpatrick, the comptroller and a real Design Studio supporter, liked it. So did Hank Hagana [executicve designer] and Bill Scott [Pontiac interior studio chief].

Bill Hoglund picks up the story here. "So we got to that meeting. We'd invited everbody who had anything to do with the car. Hulki, Schinella, Scott, manufacturing guys, sales guys, the whole staff. They'd submitted names beforehand to Planning, so we put them all up on the wall. The first process was, Okay, each guy can choose his favorite, and he had five minutes to sell it. We went around the table, and we got the list down to five. Then we got it down to three. Fiamma, Sunfire, and Fiero. Fiamma was considered too sleek. Sunfire sounded too old. But Fiero seemed just right."
The story goes on from there regarding the press conference of 11/9/82 (my 5th birthday!) that announced the car's new name of "Fiero."

I also know of one other name that was considered besides those listed above (Sprinter, Sunfire, Fiamma, Fiero, Pegasus). It was P3000, most likely following their alphanumeric system that Pontiac fell in love with in the 80's (such as the Pontiac 6000, etc).

I hope I didn't have too many typos in that! Enjoy! ;)
 

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After all the requests for the story, and the time I spent typing it, nobody has a comment? :(

:jester:
 

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Fiero.....

Fformula88 said:
After all the requests for the story, and the time I spent typing it, nobody has a comment? :(

:jester:
Interesting facts I didn't know.......Thanks for the info!
:yesnod:
 

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ntouched said:
Interesting facts I didn't know.......Thanks for the info!
:yesnod:
No problem! It probably isn't too interesting to people other than Fiero cult crazies like me, but we have a strong presence on this forum! :lol:
 

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Fformula88 said:
After all the requests for the story, and the time I spent typing it, nobody has a comment? :(

:jester:
I'm suprised to find that someone doesn't grab the bull by the horns and naming can flop back and forth so much!
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Fformula88 said:
After all the requests for the story, and the time I spent typing it, nobody has a comment? :(

:jester:
Thanks Fformula for helping me re-live a very exciting time in my life. I actually snuck in the back door of the GM training school in Dedham MA and posed as a student in order to get to see the first Fiero in New England. When I was discovered they invited me to sit in on some of the classes that they were giving to the GM techs that had not been exposed to the cars new design features (drop down engine, glued on plastic body panels etc.)
I also saw a version of an electric Fiero that they were contemplating at the time.
Since then, other than owning a 1986 Corvette for a short time, my interest in roadsters had waned until I caught a glimpse of the Solstice. Like Michael Colleoni said in The Godfather III, “every time I think I'm getting out they pull me back in”.
:)
 
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