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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dumb question here….has anyone ever put acetone in their fuel? Not that I recommend it, but guys were doing this in the Mustang club and getting 10% better fuel mileage and about 10% more HP. I never tried it, but I know several guys that did and it had no ill effects on the car or the internals…..as a matter of fact, one guy ran it religiously for 10k with no problems. Not certain what effects it would have on turbo cars or our cars for that matter. So I don’t recommend trying it unless someone knows the effects!
 

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Acetone is highly volatile and has a low flash point. Its hazardous to your health and used without a pretty good understanding of its properties can do more harm than good.

Yes some people use it. Its kind of a poor man's supercharger.

THe ill effects when they happen will be internal to the fuel system, and to the mechanicals inside the engine. When you see them its because the internal parts are no longer internal or you are inside your fuel system trying to unclog it.


Origins: As fuel prices go up, so does interest in various products and additives said to improve gas mileage. One of these is acetone, a widely-available solvent better known to most of us as nail polish remover. According to some, adding a few ounces of this chemical compound to a tank of gasoline will dramatically increase mileage, supposedly by assisting in the vaporization of fuel.

Although various claims have been made about acetone improving gas mileage by 25% or 30%, those avowals never seem to hold up to independent scrutiny: properly controlled experiments designed to measure the ballyhooed improvement fail to recognize any significant change.

Curious motorists working in less controlled settings do at times seem to note an acetone-assisted improvement, yet their results are likely better chalked up to careless measurement or miscalculation, as their findings can't be reproduced in the lab. Confusing matters further is the issue that determining




the effect of anything upon gasoline mileage is a bit more difficult to work out than it would seem, because so many different factors can affect the results. The same amount of fuel will produce different gas mileages on different days, depending upon variables such as the type of automobile, the weather conditions, whether the car's air conditioning was running, how fast the vehicle was driven, etc. Eliminating the effects of each of these factors from the computation is generally beyond the abilities of the average car owner with a passing interest in knowing how many miles to the gallon his pride and joy is getting.

Were the decision of adding or not adding acetone to one's fuel tank merely a question of whether the practice boosted gasoline performance, that would be one thing, but unfortunately there are other issues to consider, such as the harm that the solvent can work on vehicles. Acetone is corrosive, which means it can eat away at rubber components such as gaskets and O-rings — a particularly bad result for cars with rubber hoses in their fuel lines.

Acetone will also eat the paint off a car. As Tom of Car Talk noted in January 2006:
Here's our final reason not to use [acetone]: It dissolves paint. So if you slip and spill a little bit outside your fuel filler door, you'll have a nice, unpainted line running down to the bottom edge of your rear quarter panel. When we see you drive by, we'll know you didn't take our advice!

Read more at http://www.snopes.com/autos/techno/acetone.asp#fMLjB0wEeb51LVGd.99
 

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Uh yeah. Most components in your fuel delivery system will withstand acetone. Not everything in your vehicle will stand up to acetone. How much gets where?

And there's that pesky paint melting thing...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I know all of the cons vs. the pros....it was just something I thought I would ask since I know that several Mustang owners were doing this (boring day at work!!!). I know that acetone, in the right amounts, breaks the bonds of fuel more readily. Thus providing more gaseous fuel. I can say with certainty that guys were getting 10-15% better fuel mileage in a V8...thus 2-3 mpg more. I also know that too much acetone gave no added benefit, while too little did barely anything. The guys that did do this were very "anal" about their cars and about their measurements for the acetone. I know of one person that ran if for just over 10k in one year. He purposely pulled apart his fuel areas that were plastic to look at any degradation that may have occurred and the plastic and rubber parts were fine.

Don't worry, I'm not trying it!!!! Nor do I recommend anyone do it. It is dangerous and will melt the paint off the side of your car in a heartbeat if you spill it... I was just curious if anyone had tried it...that's all.
 
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I can say with certainty that guys were getting 10-15% better fuel mileage in a V8...thus 2-3 mpg more.
Hmmmm....

I won't say their figures are suspect, but in this day and age of great concern about fuel economy by both government and industry and car engineers that would kill to get one or two tenths mpg improvement, it would seem they would take great interest in something that would provide a 2 or 3 mpg increase.

Just sayin'... :dunno:
 

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It is an interesting field of study.

And clearly there are benefits if done correctly.

I think you should give it a try and report back. :)

Then if there are serious side effects you can let us know.
 

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I wouldn't put acetone in your tank in any amount. All it is doing is leaning up your afr. Our computers *should compensate (depending on your tune) if it doesn't see the desired afr by modifying the fuel trims, and it'll start dumping in more fuel which might actually result in worse gas mileage. Those old mustangs aren't run by a complex computer like ours is, so my guess is it has no idea that they are leaning out the mixture. That's all well and fine at 1/10th throttle, but running lean at WOT is not :lol:. Detonation at WOT is the #1 reason for LNF engine failure. Not to mention those mustangs aren't forced induction either.
 

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Ha, back in the day we just advanced the timing and changed the jets. Had one cranked so high I had to install an ignition kill switch so I could let the engine turn over a few times after it got hot to get it to start. those were the days.
 

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to me . it sounds like it would be corrosive to the pistons and rings like the top fuel dragsters would have to run oil like a fogging agent before shutting the car off . wonder what It will do to the fuel injectors . stupid idea. And another stupid idea why not inject straight oxygen from a tank like NOS lol run fast run far you will get much better power and fuel economy !
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
to me . it sounds like it would be corrosive to the pistons and rings like the top fuel dragsters would have to run oil like a fogging agent before shutting the car off . wonder what It will do to the fuel injectors . stupid idea. And another stupid idea why not inject straight oxygen from a tank like NOS lol run fast run far you will get much better power and fuel economy !
Actually, if you read my posts, guys in the Mustang club were doing this back in 2008 when fuel climbed to over $4.50/gallon. There were no ill affects that any of them recorded.

As far as O2, why do you think so many top fuel dragsters were blowing motors back 2-3 years ago? Rumor has it in the drag racing community that they maybe running up to 80% O2 in their fuel systems... Someone in pro-stock was caught using it and storing it in the roll cage bars 2 or 3 years ago, but I don't remember who it was....
 

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resurrecting this thread...

on my corvette, with 350ZZ4 and homemade EFI, the day before yesterday i wanted to see if i could improve the octane rating of my gasoline as i had been getting a bit of spark knock if i lugged the engine (yeh, i know, don't lug the engine) and i had also put Marvel Mystery Oil in the tank for storage purposes (and "I" have noticed that the MMO seems to a bit of a performance penalty until the gas is used up)... so i remembered various threads about improving gas mileage by putting hardware store acetone into the tank, BUT no one said HOW MUCH.

well, i got a quart from Lowes and dumped the entire can into a 15 gallon tank. after the fact, i then did a google search on adding acetone to gas for MPG improvement... amazingly they were only recommending 4 ounces per 10 gallons; WELL i put in enough for 80 gallons....

now i know all about the possible seal and other potential damage, and time will tell... but i do believe i have gotten a bit of an octane boost as starting the vehicle from a stop light or other potentially lugging scenarios (too high a gear for the speed) i do seem to hear and feel a difference...

thoughts?

Bill
 

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At 3% mix you can theoretically get 2-3% more power, assuming the ECM doesn't compensate for the mixture change. Even without the potential and unknown risks to the fuel system that doesn't seem to be worth the effort for a street car.
 

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I wouldn't put acetone in your tank in any amount. All it is doing is leaning up your afr. Our computers *should compensate (depending on your tune) if it doesn't see the desired afr by modifying the fuel trims, and it'll start dumping in more fuel which might actually result in worse gas mileage. Those old mustangs aren't run by a complex computer like ours is, so my guess is it has no idea that they are leaning out the mixture. That's all well and fine at 1/10th throttle, but running lean at WOT is not :lol:. Detonation at WOT is the #1 reason for LNF engine failure. Not to mention those mustangs aren't forced induction either.
Mustangs run the same as most cars in that it will monitor the fuel trims and adjust short and long term fuel trims accordingly. Knock sensors will pull ignition timing if needed. Yes there are a number of things we mustang owners try but usually we are going the other way and trying to increase octane. Many of us tend to mess with ethanol percentage and toluene additives. Me, I have a boat place near my house that sells 100 octane. I just use that when I wanna turn up the motor.
 

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At 3% mix you can theoretically get 2-3% more power, assuming the ECM doesn't compensate for the mixture change. Even without the potential and unknown risks to the fuel system that doesn't seem to be worth the effort for a street car.
John

the nature of this engine, for me, seems to come on cam about 1800ish and then a fairly flat high curve to redline; hence in city low speed driving it becomes a choice of driving around in 2nd or 3rd gear to keep rpms approx 2000 or above, or lugging a bit in 4th. starting in motion falls into that 800-1800 portion of lower steep torque curve

Line Font Parallel Slope Technology


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hence PIA... back when i had a 3.17 first gear, no problem; now with a 2.62, problem..

at 60 cents difference in 87 to 93, 15 gallons equal $9 (it, like the solstice or my smart, under normal circumstances run perfectly well on 85 even though they should have something higher. a quart of acetone is less than $9. i'm not advocating the use of acetone, just wondering where the limit(s) are..

thanks

Bill
 

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John

the nature of this engine, for me, seems to come on cam about 1800ish and then a fairly flat high curve to redline; hence in city low speed driving it becomes a choice of driving around in 2nd or 3rd gear to keep rpms approx 2000 or above, or lugging a bit in 4th. starting in motion falls into that 800-1800 portion of lower steep torque curve

hence PIA... back when i had a 3.17 first gear, no problem; now with a 2.62, problem..

at 60 cents difference in 87 to 93, 15 gallons equal $9 (it, like the solstice or my smart, under normal circumstances run perfectly well on 85 even though they should have something higher. a quart of acetone is less than $9. i'm not advocating the use of acetone, just wondering where the limit(s) are..

thanks

Bill
A gallon of acetone at my local Lowe's is $20, or $5 per quart. I would not go to the extra effort, or accept the extra risk, for $4 per tank.

Based on the test that I read the results of, 3% seems to be what they determined to be optimum, and that equates to 57-1/2 ounces when completely filling a 15-gallon tank. If less fuel is added, proportionally less acetone would be needed. Mixing would be best if the acetone is added to the tank along with the gasoline, and adding it before or after each has its potential problems. I did not see any tests regarding separation, and while I would expect it to stay in solution, it would be good to know.
 

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I ran it in my dirt bike in japan in the mid 70's when I was out of gas and needed a fix . yes it runs, yes it flys. yes it doesn't take long till you need a new piston.... 💩 good thing I was in japan where parts were oh so cheep for my honda for some reason:unsure: acetome also eats many plastics...like possibly our fuel tanks..:eek::poop:
 

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He, he, he. I use Acetone down here in Tennessee to kill the chiggers that burrow into my legs after a long hike in the woods. Put some on a cotton pad and vigorously rub the bite. It works! I get chewed up every year by them damned critters....
 
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