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Discussion Starter #1
Tire rack seems to make it pretty easy as far as narrowing the search into performance categories, but just wondering if there may be some things I am overlooking. I am getting tuned this summer and I want to have a little more fun in the Solstice so I am pulling the trigger on new rubber for safer motoring.

Can I just assume a tire with a lower tread wear will grip better than a tire with a higher number? I would gather from the rating it reflects the rubber durometer to an extent. I think the stock tires are 280 tread wear so I was going to get something around 200.

I am considering these at the moment:

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/TireSearchResults.jsp?tireIndex=0&autoMake=Pontiac&autoYear=2007&autoModel=Solstice+GXP&autoModClar=&width=245/&ratio=45&diameter=18&sortCode=54050&skipOver=true&minSpeedRating=H&minLoadRating=S&tab=All

Any others you may recommend? All questions/comments welcome.
 

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Can I just assume a tire with a lower tread wear will grip better than a tire with a higher number? I would gather from the rating it reflects the rubber durometer to an extent. I think the stock tires are 280 tread wear so I was going to get something around 200.
Absolutely NOT. Tire rack also supply a number of reviews on their more popular tires and you can compare grip there, but there's more to it than just dry static grip. There's wet grip, braking (wet and dry) cornering feel, longevity (also not necessarily represented by treadware numbers), price and a host of others.

PLEASE do a search across the forums, this topic has been discussed VERY many times and everyone has an opinion. Michelin PSS have a good reputation (for instance). I have Conti Extreme DWS on my car because I want 4-season use... another example of a tire with much higher treadware rating yet far higher 'grip' than stock.
 

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Discussion Starter #3

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Agree w TS. I have the Michelin Pilot Super Sports (love em) and they have both a better tread wear rating and better grip than the Star Specs. Tire Track gives you comparison tests and consumer reviews. Use them to pick the best tire for you.

BTW, there is a new generation of Star Specs coming out that by first tests are far better. Not in our size but that is coming. You may want to see about those if you are not in a hurry.

Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

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I recently bought a set of Michelin Primacy MXV4's. I only have about 500 miles on them, but I really like them. Look at the comparison chart I posted in thread "New tires for 2007 GXP". The Pilot SS has slightly better dry traction, but the Primacy MXV4 is better in all other categories.
 

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Sounds like if a method could be devised it would benefit consumers. Meaning.

1. Performance
2. Dry Traction
3. Wet Traction
4. Durability, etc.
or
1. Durability
2. Wet traction
3. Dry traction
4. Performance

By entering your preferences in the order that's important would help achieve a recommendation for specific brand/model because its a given that what works best in one application (performance) may not work that great in another (durability).
 

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I recently bought a set of Michelin Primacy MXV4's. I only have about 500 miles on them, but I really like them. Look at the comparison chart I posted in thread "New tires for 2007 GXP". The Pilot SS has slightly better dry traction, but the Primacy MXV4 is better in all other categories.
Uh, dude, you can't use customer review data to compare apples and oranges - the yardsticks are different. Your Primacy is an all season tire and the Pilot Super Super is an extreme performance summer tire. No way that an all season tire comes close, even as good as some all seasons are. When looking at customer review data like that, it is useful only when comparing the same types of tires.
 

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You will notice that the tread wear number tends be a little subjective. :lol:

I put the Eagle GTs on my wife's Sky. And the tread wear number is 400. But they are waaay stickier than the factory F1s, which had a 280 tread wear. :dunno: They even feel gooier to the touch.
 

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Tread wear is not stickiness but how long they will last. And that does vary by how youuse them. And the stockers were crap.
 

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The F1s are AA rated.
The GTs are AA A rated.

So that must be the difference. Whatever the case, I have to agree that the F1s are less than desirable. :lol:
 

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From what I remember reading, there is no standard for tread wear numbers. You can't compare #s across manufacturers. They are only good for comparing within a manufacturer. Each manufacturer has its own system for rating tread wear, so x-brand comparisons of the 3s are meaningless.
 

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Choptop: The comparison chart I referenced has some filters to narrow the choices.

Treeman: The comparison chart includes the Pilot SS and the Pilot AS, as well as some other performance tires. I'll admit that I'm not a performance driver, and I will be driving on these tires year-round, so all of these factors are a consideration for me.
 

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From what I remember reading, there is no standard for tread wear numbers. You can't compare #s across manufacturers. They are only good for comparing within a manufacturer. Each manufacturer has its own system for rating tread wear, so x-brand comparisons of the 3s are meaningless.
That is correct. Also, any test is just a test - think of the EPA fuel mileage ratings.

From Discount Tire's web site (Error - Discount Tire
The US Government has established the UTQG, the Uniform Tire Quality Grading, to assist consumers in their purchase of tires. Basically it's another tool to be used besides the opinions you gather from trusted friends, mechanics and whatever other sources you may have at your disposal. The key to using this system is to understand that it is a relative comparison system. The UTQG is not a safety rating and not a guarantee that a tire will last for a prescribed number of miles. Under UTQG, manufacturers use three criteria to grade tires: treadwear, traction and temperature. The information is right where you need it when buying the tire:

•On the paper label affixed to the tread
•On the tire molded into the sidewall
The treadwear grade is a comparative rating based on the wear of a tire when tested carefully under controlled conditions. For example the useful tread on a tire graded 400 should last twice as long as a tire graded 200. However, another tire manufacturer may grade a comparable design 300, so a grade of 150 would last just half as long under their grading scheme. The lesson learned is to not use one manufacturer's grade versus the other, but instead to compare tire grades within a given brand. Actual treadwear performance can vary tremendously according to the tire's real-world use. Variations in driving habits, service practices (most importantly air pressure maintenance), road conditions and climate affect tire life.

Traction grades represent the tire's ability to stop on wet pavement as measured under controlled conditions on asphalt and concrete test surfaces. As of 1997, the traction grades from highest to lowest are "AA","A","B" and "C". A tire graded "AA" may have relatively better traction performance than a tire graded lower, based on straight-ahead braking tests. The grades do not take into consideration the cornering or turning performance of a tire.

Temperature grades represent a tire's resistance to heat and its ability to dissipate heat when tested under controlled laboratory test conditions. The grades from highest to lowest are "A","B" and "C". The grade "C" corresponds to the minimum performance required by federal safety standard. Therefore, the "A" tire is the coolest running, and even though the "C" tire runs hotter it does not mean it is unsafe. The temperature grade is established for a tire that is properly inflated and not overloaded.
 

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have read threads and tire comparisons

still don't know what to get either

never drive in rain but the few times i've got caught in a shower - its PAST SCARY - MY # 1 PREFERENCE IS SAFER IN RAIN

beyond that a performance summer tire is what i need !

the more i read the more confused i get - still riding on the original crap tires - really gotta make up my mind soon

let us know whatcha get - anybody point me at what i want :yawn:....i need help too - my eyes glaze everytime i try a serious search
 

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still don't know what to get either

never drive in rain but the few times i've got caught in a shower - its PAST SCARY - MY # 1 PREFERENCE IS SAFER IN RAIN

beyond that a performance summer tire is what i need !
Performance summer tires should do well in the rain too... just not so well in the cold.

OK, I'll make your decision easy: get Michelin PSS (Pilot Super Sports). Acknowledged to be fine tires in every review I've seen. Will be fine in the rain and infinitely preferable to stock. You will NOT regret it.

If you are still not sure, read the pdf I posted here: http://www.kappaperformance.com/forum/index.php/topic,5468.msg75253.html#msg75253
 

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Summer tires are generally better in the rain than all seasons because the sipes, which are the little zig zaggy cuts used to grip on ice, decrease wet traction. If your winter temps rarely go below 45 degrees, you are better with summer tires. There are a variety of summer tires with varying grip, noise, ride, and treadwear characteristics. I own and love the Super Sports but they are expensive and have low to moderate tread life.

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I have been kicking around trying the Super Sports, after I get done burning up what is left in the F1s I pulled off the wife's car (Turned my F1s into cheater slicks in three seasons. :lol:)

The Eagle GTs we put on her car, I must say I like a lot. We went that route with hers because she tends to drive back and forth between Denver and Ft. Collins in "blood alley" a lot. And when we get the spring and fall monsoon season rains, I wanted something that would channel a lot of water. What surprised me is that they are darn good performance tires as well. They stick really really well dry/warm to dry/hot conditions. :thumbs:

But then again, I swear my fricken snow tires stick better than the F1s. :banghead: So everything is relative. :lol::lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Still leaning towards the Bridgestone RE-11 and they are on sale right now since the RE-11A has just been released. Bridgestone only released a certain size run so far though so the RE-11A are not available in 245/45/18 yet. They have no eta and I doubt they'll be ready early April when I get them. Off chance I don't get those I will definitely get the Michelin PSS, main reason those are attractive to me is they are 5lbs lighter per, which seems like a heck of a lot. I will let ya know when I pull the trigger.

Thanks again for input...I have spent way too much time researching tires and other related tangents on this quest.:willy:
 

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Performance summer tires should do well in the rain too... just not so well in the cold.

OK, I'll make your decision easy: get Michelin PSS (Pilot Super Sports). Acknowledged to be fine tires in every review I've seen. Will be fine in the rain and infinitely preferable to stock. You will NOT regret it.

If you are still not sure, read the pdf I posted here: Consumer Reports, Nov 2010 - Tire Ratings (and Batteries)
I can vouch for the Super Sports and they're awesome ! I had these babies put on last spring and they were a huge improvement over the F1's. That might not say much in itself, but they handle just as good in the wet as they do on a dry road. They'll spin on a cold road, but thats usually when the car is just coming out of its hibernation or getting ready to be put away and you did note 'summer' tire. Can't say enough about these- expensive, but well worth it !
 
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