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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While looking for a funnel to use when adding coolant to my 2006 NA, I came across a 3/4s full, who-knows-how-old gallon container of Prestone 5/150 Extended Life Antifreeze/Coolant that has a round sticker attached to it that reads "GM DEX-COOL approved".

On both the back and bottom of the container is stamped "MT1102B".

The bottle is silver -- as is Prestone's (as well as other brand's) bottles of both full strength and 50-50 DEX-COOL antifreeze (it appears as if there's an industry standard color-coding for the packaging of the different types of antifreeze), so I'm reasonably sure it's the right product to use.

But having NO idea how old the bottle I have is, whether or not there's a shelf life to this product AND knowing that their current bottle looks a little different than the one I have (in both shape as well as the written description on the front), I want to make SURE this is both the correct coolant to add AND that it isn't so old that it's beyond the expiration date or is likely to have gone bad.

I left a message hours ago on their "Customer Service" line, after hearing the 'we're busy helping other customers -- leave a message and we'll get right back to you' recorded message that's become so common with a lot of companies.

So I wonder if anyone here knows enough (no offense, but guessing or assuming is something I can do on my own:) to tell me whether or not you'd use this product, wait to hear from Prestone or just bite the bullet and use the ZEREX I bought a couple of days ago?

Since I'll only need a few ounces, I'd love to be able to use this old stuff and return the ZEREX for a refund -- but only if I can feel safe that this old stuff isn't likely to cause a problem.

Thanks!
 

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Let me google that for you

Basically if it's not diluted, it's shelf life is many years.

I would use the new stuff. As you stated, you don't know anything about that stuff. I wouldn't put it into one of my vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Let me google that for you

Basically if it's not diluted, it's shelf life is many years.

I would use the new stuff. As you stated, you don't know anything about that stuff. I wouldn't put it into one of my vehicles.
Not to blow smoke, but being completely honest, I asked here because I know that there are a lot of forum members (Mister Wire, for one:) whose knowledge I trust more than I'd trust the opinions I figured I'd find elsewhere.

And reading what Prestone's own website says ("...it also has a shelf life of many years") now makes me wonder why I'd even trust an answer from them -- when they use such a vague, imprecise term as "many years".

"Many" means very different things to different people -- so their answer gives me no useful information, nor any confidence to use what very well may be perfectly good product.

Or may just as well be stuff that went bad a decade ago.

And the use of a coded lot number or manufacturing (or expiration!) date is also of zero help. I could ASSume that "1102" means NOV 2002 -- but it might not. Even if it DOES, that still doesn't tell me if that's the manufacturing date or expiration date -- or even if there IS a date beyond which its use is not recommended.

Why companies do stuff like that is a mystery to me (other than that if you don't KNOW, you're more likely to buy new product instead of using old stuff that was paid for years ago).

The good news is that I don't plan to drive the Solstice today or even tomorrow, so I can wait to see if they return my call or reply to the email I sent them.
 

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Manufacturing date and/or expiration date is always going to be "safe". (I'm dealing with this on several silly issues in my "day job".) If it should last 3 years I'm going to tell you 2 years because A - I don't want anything to go bad and I'll be sued for it and B - I want to sell you more.

A "lot code" is going to be even less traceable and I'm understanding more and more why that is. You don't want the public to be able to "deduce" what they think is going on. The manufacturer WILL maintain traceability because they may need to produce that in court - so they're not going to play games with it. However, they don't want the consumer to play games with it either.

My ruling on the field stands. If you don't know what the heck it is, use the known and discard the unknown.
 
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