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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was reading on Wikipedia that the 5l40-e transmission in my gxp is rated at 250 foot pounds of torque. My question is if a add a tune that exceeds 250fpt do I need to build the tranny to withstand the extra torque. I know mechanical engineers usually under rate transmission capabilities. I don't want to grenade my tranny so how much torque can I safely run?
 

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The transmission is able to handle a lot more then 250ftlbs of torque. It is able to handle in excess of 400ftlbs of torque.

The other thing is the most damage/wear occurs when going WOT from a stop. The computer limits what the engine is able to output until a specific speed is met. This is to prevent damage to the drive train.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's good info. I'm a old Chevy guy. Naturally aspirated small and big block V8's I know inside and out. All the new electronics are Greek to me as are turbo's. My 2009 Volkswagen Jetta has never broken down so other than regular maintenance I've never had to touch it. Here's a example of GM design stupidity. Here's a example of GM design stupidity. My 2006 Silverado with the 5.3 LS motor. The knock sensors are in the valley pan between the heads under the intake manifold. They sit down in wells. The intake has foam pieces front and back that's supposed to keep water from getting under the intake which of course don't work. So water gets down to the threads of the knock sensors and rusts(cast iron block). The sensors have a tin piece that's shaped like a hex bolt to put a socket on to remove them which of course strip and just spin so you have to destroy the sensor top, drill and tap reverse threads and put in a bolt in to remove them. Plus the time to R and R the intake. GM engineering at it's finest.
 

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That's good info. I'm a old Chevy guy. Naturally aspirated small and big block V8's I know inside and out. All the new electronics are Greek to me as are turbo's. My 2009 Volkswagen Jetta has never broken down so other than regular maintenance I've never had to touch it. Here's a example of GM design stupidity. Here's a example of GM design stupidity. My 2006 Silverado with the 5.3 LS motor. The knock sensors are in the valley pan between the heads under the intake manifold. They sit down in wells. The intake has foam pieces front and back that's supposed to keep water from getting under the intake which of course don't work. So water gets down to the threads of the knock sensors and rusts(cast iron block). The sensors have a tin piece that's shaped like a hex bolt to put a socket on to remove them which of course strip and just spin so you have to destroy the sensor top, drill and tap reverse threads and put in a bolt in to remove them. Plus the time to R and R the intake. GM engineering at it's finest.
Never have I been so happy that my LS is aluminum....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Don't get me wrong, it's a great truck but it has it's quirks. It only has 67,000 miles on it but when the weather cools down I'm pulling the motor and replacing the main seals, oil pump o-ring, oil pan gasket and rocker cover gaskets, exhaust gaskets, transmission input and output seals, axle and transfer case seals. People don't realize that that these parts go bad even when the vehicle isn't driven. Same thing with fluids, they break down over time. Preventative maintenance can save you thousands in repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I recently rebuilt the motor in a friend's 1965 Pontiac star chief. 389c.i. tri-power carbs. Beautiful car, low miles but the engine was leaking like a sieve. All the gaskets were the original cork which were hard as rock. Ended up replacing every gasket and seal on the entire car plus regreased the wheel bearings, all new steering component boots, new shocks because the mounting rubber boots were shot, new motor mounts. Three weeks later his car was like new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A lot of people think the newer neoprene gaskets will last indefinitely but that's not true. 10-12 years depending on how much the vehicle is driven. Heat is the worst enemy for neoprene, it shrinks and hardens. I can almost guarantee that after 10 years or so if you check the torque on your valve cover bolts they will be out of spec.
 

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rubber gaskets harden over time just like the cork ones do. Cork gaskets ALWAYS leak. well not leak, they do seep. cork sucks!!! LOL.. Quite a few manufacturers are changing over to using RTV. RTV doesn't seem to have the issue with hardening like the neoprene/rubber gaskets have. It is common o see the RTV being used on front covers and oil pans right from the factoy.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The point is that even if your car is a garage queen seals and gaskets will eventually fail. Yeah, it sucks pulling the motor to do preventative maintenance but the first time you see a few drops of oil on your floor or driveway your going to have to do it anyway, better to it when you can rather than when you have to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Different strokes. I enjoy working on cars, it keeps me out of the bars plus buying a new motor is a lot more expensive than checking your internals components every 50,000 or 60,000 miles especially on a high performance engine. I realize most people don't have the means or knowledge to do it. A ounce of prevention is cheaper than a pound of $100 bills
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Let me ask you something. Do you check your axle boots once a month or wait until the boot has split, thrown all the grease out and the cv joint starts making noise at which point it's ruined. Replacing both boots on a axle takes a hour and around $50. New split shafts start at $150-$180. I'd rather spend $50 and a hour or so of my time.
 

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BMW gaskets turn to hard plastic in time and heat and leak like a sieve. For any complexity in fixing a solstice, double plus on a BMW. I drove the simplest miata NA 1991 for many years as my fun car and loved it. Decided to switch things up and looked at all the roadsters out there. I ended up at the solstice and I know I made the right choice for me, from a value perspective, fun and aesthetic viewpoint. I know we are biased, as all other owners are for their ride, but the more you get to know the car, the more you love it. Other opinions may vary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I fell in love with the gxp the first time I test drove one. I've had a number of Chevy muscle cars over the years but none were as fun as my solstice. Yeah, tire roasting raw horsepower is cool but driving hard on a twisting windey road and accelerating hard out of a turn is exhilarating. Last Thursday I drove up to our local ski resort, lots of switchbacks. The adrenaline rush was awesome. Love me some gxp
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Back in the day my dad collected MG's. He had a midget that he put a 1600 cc engine into, stock was 1100cc, it had twin Weber updraft carbs, a cam and high compression pistons so it had some power but what was awesome was the handling. It was like driving a high powered go-kart. The suspension was hard as a rock but there was zero under or over steer. Super fun car.
 

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Mine are on the lift every couple of weeks. So yes I check the CV boots.

Different strokes. I was taught in the Army the DFI rule. If it aint broke, then leave it alone. Often less skilled people can do more harm than good by "fixing" things that are not broke.

You obviously have skills and you enjoy doing a lot of preventative maintenance. Wonderful. Most owner struggle with not overfilling the fuel tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I did my time in the Navy where preventative maintenance was a big deal. Two military guys go into a restroom, one army, the other navy. They both do their business and the navy guy zips up and heads for the door, the army guy says "hey sailor, in the army they teach us to wash our hands after urinating". The navy guy responds "in the Navy they teach us not to pee on our hands". :)
 
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