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I am installing a auxiliary coolant radiator under the standard radiator and fan shroud. And i would like to hook the new fan relay to the fan relay already on the car i know it has varying speed and dont want to mess that operation. Any suggestions? Thanks
 

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Why are you adding another radiator?
 

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What he said.

Do you have a GXP?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am adding a auxiliary radiator to lower the water temp which i think is a little too high. I have power to the new relay that will not come from the wiring on the existing fan i just want to trip the relay on the new fan.
 

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we would really like to understand your motivation for doing this modification to your car.
I do not recall anybody doing it, but others will chime in if I am wrong.

Normal temps can get as high as 215 degrees F

gxp or not ?
where do you live ?
does the car have any other modifications ?
 

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What Sir William said! These engines are designed to run hot for efficiency. They are fine with high temps unless the water pump/blockage/coolant loss or some other failure bumps it to 240+.
 

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The temp are at times with the A/C on at red light is right at 230. {I am a hick from east tn.} I guess i go back to BBC Corvette drag racing when you leave the line at 165 instead of 210 it will go one tenth faster. In later years i road raced a vintage big block Corvette it also made more power at a lower temp. So i am not convinced higher temp is the way to go. Thanks for your time..
 

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The temp are at times with the A/C on at red light is right at 230. {I am a hick from east tn.} I guess i go back to BBC Corvette drag racing when you leave the line at 165 instead of 210 it will go one tenth faster. In later years i road raced a vintage big block Corvette it also made more power at a lower temp. So i am not convinced higher temp is the way to go. Thanks for your time..
Do you have a GXP (turbo) or an NA (2.4) ? The fan controls are different for the two models, so which you have will change the way you can control your new fan.
 

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The temp are at times with the A/C on at red light is right at 230. {I am a hick from east tn.} I guess i go back to BBC Corvette drag racing when you leave the line at 165 instead of 210 it will go one tenth faster. In later years i road raced a vintage big block Corvette it also made more power at a lower temp. So i am not convinced higher temp is the way to go. Thanks for your time..
Bleed your cooling system.
 

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Sorry Yes i have a GXP i thought i listed it under the GXP. I would like for it to come on when the stock an does. I cannot get a wiring diagram to come up of the fan circuit. . Thanks
 

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Sorry Yes i have a GXP i thought i listed it under the GXP. I would like for it to come on when the stock an does. I cannot get a wiring diagram to come up of the fan circuit. . Thanks
You did. Sorry for overlooking that, but the way I view the forum the sub-forums are not always obvious.
I have also learned to not assume anything based on where something is posted.

The fan has three connections in a four-pin plug:
  1. RD/BK should have 12V at all times.
  2. BK should have a good chassis ground at all times.
  3. No Connection
  4. WH grounded through the ECM and varies with the speed that the ECM wants the fan to turn. This is a signal ground, and not a power ground!
While 230F is certainly not normal, there is probably something wrong to cause it. You should be seeing 220 or less when stopped with the AC on. What temperature do you see when moving? The engine is designed to operate at 200F, and you really don't want it to be below 190F.

As @shabby suggests, you could have air in the system, and there are some check valves that can be installed to help keep it from coming back. The GXP is also susceptible to water pump failure, so that is another possible issue. Depending on mileage you could also e due for a new thermostat.

Several members have reported temperatures similar to what you are seeing, and had them go back to normal after replacing the coolant, thermostat, and water pump.

You shouldn't need additional cooling, and by adding it you may be covering up a problem that will just get worse and still require you to fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thank you John WR for the info. It does move back to 200 to 210 when moving but slowly. I think the cooling system is working as it should. But i dont know for sure i have not had the car but about one month. When i raced heat was a problem. On a road race i could have 230 to 240 on a hot day. But every thing worked better at around 200
 

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Thank you John WR for the info. It does move back to 200 to 210 when moving but slowly. I think the cooling system is working as it should. But i dont know for sure i have not had the car but about one month. When i raced heat was a problem. On a road race i could have 230 to 240 on a hot day. But every thing worked better at around 200
You're welcome. From that information I would say that if you have a problem it isn't a bad one. I would change the coolant and maybe the thermostat - only use an OEM Delco 'stat - make sure you get all the air out of the system - a vacuum bleeder is the best method, but there are videos about the procedure withut one - and see how it is. The water pump isn't particularly expensive or hard to do, so while you have it apart you might want to do that as well, just because they do have a reputation for failure.

One thing about racing is that you are using a lot more power more constantly than you usually are on the street, and that means you are generating a lot more waste heat. A tune that gives you more power than stock can help overstress the cooling system if you are using that power a lot, but especially stock, if everything is working you really shouldn't need more cooling.
 

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Hi Jackson.

For reference, I bought a left over 2007 GXP brand new off the lot in 2008. I would see 188ish to 209* F at operating temp. I was a fool to trade that car in. In 2010 I got the GMPP turbo upgrade kit which was essentially new sensors and a code reflash from GM; the turbo itself isn't touched. The upgrade made no difference re: indicated temps.

I bought a 2008 GXP last year. I see the same temp range as my 2007 GXP in that car at operating temp. Highway at 85mph, backroads at 30 mph, same same.

I am a converted muscle car guy.. Did that for over 20 years. My 455 bored .030" over would run at T-stat temp all day long (mechanical gauge). Over bore, and fairly thin block, I was expecting high temps and was glad to not see them, and if you had told me then that I'd have a car later which had a normal range of about 190 to 209*F I would've said "something's wrong". It took me a while to get used to electric fans in modern performance cars. That and the sewing machine sound, lol.

RE: racing a GXP if I recall, the Solstice GXP faces a challenge when road racing, even bone stock, due to heat extraction issues.
 

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The vehicle has coolant temperature based fail-safes to prevent overheating (presuming you have not tuned them out). One of them is that the vehicle will disable the A/C compressor if the coolant gets too hot or the rate of increase in coolant temperature is too fast. The system operation is something like the over-temp light comes on at 122C, the A/C disables at 124C and you're in trouble at 126C (or maybe the A/C disables prior the light? To long ago for me to remember the specifics) The general performance of the cooling system is developed to maintain ideal temperatures at 100F ambient, If you're in a region that typically sees temperatures in the high 90's and above, you will see higher peaks in coolant temperature especially at a stop with A/C on.

The bottom line to this function is that if your A/C is still on and you don't have a temp light on, your coolant is in an acceptable operating range.

Personally, I wouldn't mess with the system. It's already very temperamental from a fill and airflow standpoint, and you'd be introducing several more coolant joints that would have the potential to loosen or get damaged and leak. Make sure you follow the well documented processes for filling on this forum (or do a pressurized fill) so you know you have a packed coolant system. Maybe replace the pump and the stat as others have suggested and see where you end up. Adding an aux cooler seems like unnecessary effort to me, and it'd be equivalent effort to replace the stat and pump anyway, both of which are a decade old at minimum.
 

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What about a radiator upgrade... Pwerks has a nice dual core aluminum one for sale.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thank you G for the info, some i did not know. In response to Greatgab i am retired and do not have the spare dollars for that big radiator
 

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The temp are at times with the A/C on at red light is right at 230. {I am a hick from east tn.} I guess i go back to BBC Corvette drag racing when you leave the line at 165 instead of 210 it will go one tenth faster. In later years i road raced a vintage big block Corvette it also made more power at a lower temp. So i am not convinced higher temp is the way to go. Thanks for your time..
This isn't the case with the ecotech. They actually run better in a hotter range then the 165. Change your thermostat and put a true ACDelco in it. Mine runs 190 all day long, under load it might see 196....
 
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