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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Pontiac badges, on the front fenders sides,.... How are these attached?
Adhesive tape? Badge w/screw and nut?
 

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Welcome to the forum

Yes

Tape and for later cars a bolt and nut

Easiest way is to remove the fender so you can access the back side

I removed mine while on the car but it's a bit more difficult
 

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2007 car nut and bolt , the little square GM emblems (chicklets)on the fender bottoms are held on with tape and can be removed with a hair dryer and some fishing line ,warn up the emblem then take the fishing line and run it in a back and forth motion (sawing)on the back of the emblem it will come off .If you have any left over gunk on the fender a little bit of mineral spirits on a soft rag will safely clean it up . Welcome to the forum so I'm guessing the mod bug has bitten you ?
 

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I junked all the badges on my 09 Coupe and they were all held on with emblem tape. I sawed them off with dental floss, no heat needed, picked off the bigger residue chunks with my fingernail, and did final clean up with WD40, which is just fancy kerosene. The nose and possibly the side badges sit on raised Ponticrap arrowhead extrusions.
 

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Oh NOES!

WD-40 was developed in 1953 by Norm Larsen,[2] founder of the Rocket Chemical Company, in San Diego, California. WD-40, abbreviated from the phrase "Water Displacement, 40th formula", indicating it was the 40th formula the chemists tried before finding success.[1] The product was originally designed to repel water and prevent corrosion on the Atlas space rocket, and later was found to have numerous household uses.[1]

Larsen was attempting to create a formula to prevent corrosion in nuclear missiles, by displacing the standing water that causes it. He claims he arrived at a successful formula on his 40th attempt.[3] WD-40 is primarily composed of various hydrocarbons.

WD-40 was first used by Convair to protect the outer skin and, more importantly, the paper-thin balloon tanks of the Atlas missile from rust and corrosion.[3][4] These stainless steel fuel tanks were so thin that, when empty, they had to be kept inflated with nitrogen gas to prevent their collapse.

WD-40 first became commercially available on store shelves in San Diego, California in 1958.


50% "aliphatic hydrocarbons". The manufacturer's website specifically claims that this fraction in the current formulation cannot be accurately referred to as Stoddard solvent, a similar mixture of hydrocarbons.

<25% petroleum base oil, presumably a mineral oil or light lubricating oil.

12-18% low vapor pressure aliphatic hydrocarbon, to reduce the viscosity for use in aerosols. This fraction evaporates during application.

2-3% carbon dioxide, presumably as a propellant, is now used instead of liquefied petroleum gas to reduce WD-40's considerable flammability.

<10% inert ingredients.

 
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