Pontiac Solstice Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I used to have a boost tester set up for my Subaru and I want to build one for the solstice. I could take everything apart and measure it but does anyone know offhand the outer diameter of the engine intake where the hose clamps to it? How about the outer diameter of the turbo outlet where the inner cooler hose attaches to it?

I figure if I can test and plug those spots I’ll pretty much have every connection be part of the test except the turbo outlet clamp and the engine intake clamp of course.
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Pontiac Solstice GXP - Mysterious (with unkown origin blue sparkle in rear bumper cover paint)
Joined
·
3,371 Posts
I just did a boost test on my system after installing an aftermarket turbo.
I attached my boost leak test at the front of the turbo air intake.
Not sure of the advantage or need to test the air intake tube?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The inlet sounds smart. What was the outer diameter of the inlet? That’s a little harder to get to but would show leaks in the turbo/gaskets themselves.

where did you plug the other end? The manifold intake is kind of hard to get to so I was trying to do it may be at the last charge pipe end. The only problem is that I wouldn’t know if the factory tube that goes from the charge pipe to the intake manifold was leaking somehow.
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Pontiac Solstice GXP - Mysterious (with unkown origin blue sparkle in rear bumper cover paint)
Joined
·
3,371 Posts
You want to open the oil fill cap so as to avoid pressurizing enough to blow the head gasket (or so I have read)
I used a DDM silicone tube that was meant to go between the turbo elbow outlet and charge pipe.
It was a tiny bit too small but that was fine as I was able to stretch it over the turbo inlet and then t-clamp it tight.
I believe the DDM and the OEM rubber are the same size.
That being said I do not have a K04 turbo anymore though I “think” the inlet is the same diameter one my WR2 as the K04.
I would suggest doing some research online as it is possible to damage your car if you aren’t doing it correctly.
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Light Automotive lighting Automotive design
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
HHGadget, where are you pressurizing? Near the intake manifold? You’re not pressurizing the block right as won’t exhaust just leak right out the open exhaust valves?

As far as oil pressure are you saying when you pressurize the turbo it may feed back through the oil lines and pressurize that, hence open oil cap?

Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Pontiac Solstice GXP - Mysterious (with unkown origin blue sparkle in rear bumper cover paint)
Joined
·
3,371 Posts
"Boost Leak Test" is what i was referring to.
Air (charge pipe) pressure, not oil. As in the picture pressurizing from the front (intake of the turbo). Oil fill cap is recommended to be removed to avoid too much pressure within the engine. It will still leak naturally but within 5-10PSI (max) you should have a few moments to check for charge pipe leakage. Sprayed some water around the suspect areas to help add to the leak noise.
That is how i found a leak on my intake manifold gasket.
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Pontiac Solstice GXP - Mysterious (with unkown origin blue sparkle in rear bumper cover paint)
Joined
·
3,371 Posts
By the way. The airbox also has the same dimension --> fits a 70mm (2.75") ID hose.
I think the OP is talking about a GXP (turbo) ?, and although you can absolutely isolate the intake manifold / head by pressure testing at the throttle body, because the GXP has so many more pipes/tubes where possible leaks can occur than the NA, it is my understanding that starting at the turbo inlet is considered the first step as it is essentially the "front" or start of the charge system.
Also getting to the throttle body on the GXP (no idea on the NA) is a bit of a pain as it is under the intake manifold and pointed straight down where there isn't a lot of room to work.

In my particular recent case, the leak was found to be the intake to head gasket but I'd be willing to bet that is a more rare occurrence than all the couplings involved in the charge air system from turbo, through CAC/IC and ultimately ending at the intake mani. Just a lot of rubber and not-so-great OEM worm drive clamps that can fail in the system over time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,224 Posts
Also getting to the throttle body on the GXP (no idea on the NA) is a bit of a pain as it is under the intake manifold and pointed straight down where there isn't a lot of room to work.
Writhe in envy GXPers! 😁 The NA has a very lightweight, plastic intake manifold which also houses the throttle body directly, it is pinted up and you just reach over the driver's wheel and you have ample access to it!

At least, if we don't have the same power as the GXP's/Redlines, we also have half the worry...

Back on topic, before @JohnWR awards me the topic derailer medal for today: I understand and agree with you about where to put the leak test setup and the possible places that might be leaking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So I’ve attached boost tester to Turbo Inlet, and I put a plug in the last charge pipe outlet. This way I’m not even addressing anything with the intake manifold are engine at this point.

I can’t get anything to pressurize at all which is very strange to me. i’m redoing all the clamps and I’ve ordered some clamps for ones that aren’t the best.

even after we doing the clamps I still can’t get boost pressure. The The boost controller solenoid tube that attaches near the MAP could the solenoid be “open” and letting air by? This is all weird to me.

could something in the turbo internals be letting air by that I just don’t understand?

Automotive tire Tire Tread Carbon Rim



Automotive fuel system Motor vehicle Gas Auto part Vehicle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Did that and no leak whatsoever. Even held air for like 5 minutes plus.

Hand Tire Fluid Sports equipment Finger


Motor vehicle Automotive design Hood Vehicle Car


Motor vehicle Auto part Vehicle Automotive exterior Automotive air manifold


So for sure it shouldn’t work to pressurize the turbo inlet? Just making sure. I guess there’s no way to see if turbo itself has some sort of leak?

I already checked the evap solenoid and it’s fine. Hmmmm….
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Pontiac Solstice GXP - Mysterious (with unkown origin blue sparkle in rear bumper cover paint)
Joined
·
3,371 Posts
Did that and no leak whatsoever. Even held air for like 5 minutes plus.

View attachment 121779

View attachment 121778

View attachment 121780

So for sure it shouldn’t work to pressurize the turbo inlet? Just making sure. I guess there’s no way to see if turbo itself has some sort of leak?

I already checked the evap solenoid and it’s fine. Hmmmm….
Sorry my information was erroneous as I have an aftermarket turbo where the line to the valve cover is relocated to the air intake hose.
As stated by Sir Shabby stock turbo has that line after the intake inlet on it.
Apologies
 

·
Registered
2008 Pontiac Solstice GXP
Joined
·
5,683 Posts
DO NOT do this test from the front of the turbo. Disconnect the coupling at the top of the turbo and test from there. There is a PCV line attached to the turbo that is just going to blow the air into the crankcase on the engine. You also don't want to put pressure backwards on the recirculation valve as you can damage the diaphragm.

I suggest you pull that schrader valve that you use to put air into the system and get a tee attached to the plug with a gauge on it and the schrader valve fitted to the tee. If you go into the plumbing section of home depot someone should be able to assist you with getting a pressure gauge on it. You want to pressurize the system to 20psi and see if it holds that pressure. This is why I suggest the gauge because every time you use a tire pressure gauge to check the pressure you are letting air out.
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Pontiac Solstice GXP - Mysterious (with unkown origin blue sparkle in rear bumper cover paint)
Joined
·
3,371 Posts
What I read about this subject was to start much lower with the PSI. If you are testing for a leak you should carefully work your way up from 5 psi.
 

·
Registered
2008 Pontiac Solstice GXP
Joined
·
5,683 Posts
That is correct. Work you way up to the 20psi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Fingers crossed but I think all the replacing old clamps and readjusting sealed things up.
I have a couple more t-bolt clamps coming and a new silicone intake manifold hose from DDM, but even as is it’s holding and I think the fittings were the cause of my leak that caused a P2188 idle rich code. Nothing so far and STFT are back down to normal levels.

Boost Test: Here is what I used. We 2” plug with threaded cap using outer diameter of the plug with a 2.75” silicone hose to attach to charge pipe near intake manifold. 2” pvc pipe with cap and valve stem (drill 1/2” diameter hole, sand top of cap flat some to make thinner for valve stem, and work stem into cap). Hose clamp is 2” plumbing clamp from Lowes. IGNORE the other 2” plug I have in the bottom of the one on right with valve stem…that’s just extra so remove it obviously.

Hand Camera lens Camera accessory Liquid Cameras & optics

Liquid Automotive lighting Drinkware Automotive tire Plastic bottle
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top