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I was at a Mecum auction Saturday where a 1962 Ford Thunderbird with the optional sports roadster package went across the auction block. The sports roadster package was a fiberglass tonneau cover that covered the rear seats and provided headrest for the front seats. There were only 1427 sports roadster options sold in 62.

With the option list price was $5,500 in 1962. With 62 birds not selling for much these days, this one with the sport roadster option went for $35,000.

Might be a clue to Solstice Coupe future collectability. With 1152 made it's production numbers is close to the Sports roadster T bird option numbers. That's a little over 515% increase in value in 50 years.

With that percentage a $31,000 Solstice Coupe would be worth $190,650.00 if in good condition in 50 years. I think I'll leave mine in the garage and wait and see.;)
LJ
 

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$5,500 placed in a conservative investment back in '62 would be worth far more than $35,000 today. Plus that investment would not require gas, oil, maintenance, or insurance.

Drive the damn thing.
 

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I was at a Mecum auction Saturday where a 1962 Ford Thunderbird with the optional sports roadster package went across the auction block. The sports roadster package was a fiberglass tonneau cover that covered the rear seats and provided headrest for the front seats. There were only 1427 sports roadster options sold in 62.

With the option list price was $5,500 in 1962. With 62 birds not selling for much these days, this one with the sport roadster option went for $35,000.

Might be a clue to Solstice Coupe future collectability. With 1152 made it's production numbers is close to the Sports roadster T bird option numbers. That's a little over 515% increase in value in 50 years.

With that percentage a $31,000 Solstice Coupe would be worth $190,650.00 if in good condition in 50 years. I think I'll leave mine in the garage and wait and see.;)
LJ
Out of curiosity, did you account maintenance in the cost of ownership? For my car it's $70/month for insurance (not counting oil changes, gas, etc that Sleepy mentioned). over 50 years that is another 42k off the return (22%) not accounting for the inflation of that money (~3-4%/year) that your insurance would go up. Lets not forget that if you keep it in great condition, you may have to actually start to pay for collectors level insurance to properly cover it's full value in case something happens (I'm guessing you'll take it out occasionally just to make sure it still runs and things are working).

Next is inflation. In 2012, that same $5,500 is had the same buying power as $41,373.20 in today's dollars. So in these terms the car didn't even beat the average inflation of 4.12% per year and is worth actually less than it did brand new (source: DollarTimes.com | Inflation Calculator)

As a side little example, The highest grossing moving of all time I believe was Titanic, unless you factor in inflation and increasing cost of tickets, then the title goes to Star Wars (the 1977 original). It's fine to see 515% increase, but without factoring in everything (inflaction, cost of ownership, etc), that number is bloated at best .

Now, if you just like to keep your car in your garage because you think it's pretty and like to look at it, fine. I won't argue that with you (if you could see my office, it is literally a Mecca to the Solstice). If however your only intention is to keep it as an investment, I think it is a poor one, or at the best no better than other investment options that require far less work on your part (maintenance and continued costs).

:jm2c:
 

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Although I have to agree with it being an impracticable investment option, I am glad some people want to keep them as low milage, showroom quality examples for the future to be able to see. Nothing I enjoy more than seeing older vehicles that are show quality, although I suspect most are restorations.

As for my Sol, it will be worn out far sooner than then......as will I :lol:
 

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The T-Bird lost money:

Here is the simple math (ignoring all of the overhead costs, just looking at purchasing power of the dollar: Or more precisely-the LOSS of purchasing power of the dollar):

$5,500.00 in 1962 had the same buying power as $41,373.20 in 2012.
Annual inflation over this period was 4.12%.

Source: DollarTimes.com | Inflation Calculator

The only people that really make money on cars, are the brokers who sell them.....
 

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The minivan will be 30 years old next year.

:yawn:
 

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A coupe will be worth something in the future to a collector. But, it has to be a manual transmission model, with very few miles. Most today are drivers, at least on weekends.
 

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It's only going to be worth what someone is willing to pay for it, besides in 50 yrs you have to ask what the technology is going to be, maybe gas will be ¥30',oooo a gallon and no one will want a gasoline driven engine......
 

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This discussion is starting to sound like a former forum member who joined and then began asking off-the-wall vehicle questions so that he could watch and study the resulting internet forums societal patterns that would form so that he could quantify it as a scientific study. His methodology was quickly questioned by an forum individual who was also familiar with the subject and basically debunked his methodology to the point where he was going to report him to the appropriate professional organization(s).

These store vs collectible value threads are starting to make me feel the same way again; that I'm unknowing being used as a human lab rat.
 

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Too bad that we'll never get a definitive answer, as probably 90% of us here in the forum will be long dead by then. :sorry:
 

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LowLife1 has broken cover. Send the vans.
Repeat: he knows. The gig is up. Send the vans!
 

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I'm 19 hopefully I'll live to see my sol be worth more than the 15k I paid for it :lol: but the way I drive it I doubt it'll even make it to when I'm 40 :willy:
 

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Screw the white coats and vans. Send money (preferable cash!) to the Help LowLife1 Make A Child Smile V8 Conversion Fund. It's tax deductible. :devil:
 

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$5,500 placed in a conservative investment back in '62 would be worth far more than $35,000 today. Plus that investment would not require gas, oil, maintenance, or insurance.

Drive the damn thing.
But investments aren't free. We pay brokers and TAXES!
 

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Out of curiosity, did you account maintenance in the cost of ownership? For my car it's $70/month for insurance (not counting oil changes, gas, etc that Sleepy mentioned). over 50 years that is another 42k off the return (22%) not accounting for the inflation of that money (~3-4%/year) that your insurance would go up. Lets not forget that if you keep it in great condition, you may have to actually start to pay for collectors level insurance to properly cover it's full value in case something happens (I'm guessing you'll take it out occasionally just to make sure it still runs and things are working).

Next is inflation. In 2012, that same $5,500 is had the same buying power as $41,373.20 in today's dollars. So in these terms the car didn't even beat the average inflation of 4.12% per year and is worth actually less than it did brand new (source: DollarTimes.com | Inflation Calculator)

As a side little example, The highest grossing moving of all time I believe was Titanic, unless you factor in inflation and increasing cost of tickets, then the title goes to Star Wars (the 1977 original). It's fine to see 515% increase, but without factoring in everything (inflaction, cost of ownership, etc), that number is bloated at best .

Now, if you just like to keep your car in your garage because you think it's pretty and like to look at it, fine. I won't argue that with you (if you could see my office, it is literally a Mecca to the Solstice). If however your only intention is to keep it as an investment, I think it is a poor one, or at the best no better than other investment options that require far less work on your part (maintenance and continued costs).

:jm2c:
First of all I think we're comparing apples and oranges here. We're talking about a car and if you owned any car the costs you mention are the same. So we're on a level playing field there. (Except as the car gets older the cost of insurance for the collector who owns a coupe shoud goes down. I insured my Firebird and GTO for full replacment coverage for less than 250.00 per year.) We're still talking about cars, OK. The word "investment" is used here I think incorrectly. What most of us are talking about is keeping the car as pristine as possible as to maximize the return that we have put into it. In other words if I treated a 2009 Malibu the way some of us treat our coupes, no matter what condition it is in 30 years from now, it's not going to bring a greater percentage of the puchase price back to me when I sell it. Agree?

Ok, if you consider it an "investment" well then try this perspective. I can't drive my 401K on a Saturday night with the top off with my significant other and stop off for a beer or ice cream somewhere. Good luck getting a bar of gold ( if you could get you hands on one ) to out run some kid in a ricer with a fart can on it. Real Estate? Even discounting the bath all of us took in the last 4 years, unless you're very wealthy and you can pay cash for your house, you're not going to realize much if any profit from it when you sell it because of the interest, taxes, maintenance you pay while you own it. (precluding a short turn over, of course.)

And isn't inflation irrelevent? That money you socked away 35 years ago is worth less now then it was then because of inflation. (And there's taxes and fees to pay when you redeem it.)

So, if we're talking about keeping a somewhat rare model car in excellent condition over the years then yes, it is a good investment relative to most other cars produced. Beside, there will be fewer and fewer as time goes by, so that should sweeten the deal a bit more. We'll never run out of gold bars, 401K's or pork bellies.
 
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