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Where there is a will there is a way!

You should be able to do this no worries.

These are the things you will need to do.

  • disconnect battery
  • Pull the pump up and disconnect/cut the line and extend it so it reaches the bottom of the pump module.
  • Look for a place to drill through the top of the pump module. Using right angle drill attachment with a 3/8" drill bit in it and drill through the top of the pump module.
    Install return port kit and attach the hose it comes with so it reaches the bottom of the pump module.
  • Lock pump module back into the tank and connect breather
  • extend fuel line that is disconnected to where you are going to mount the new pump
  • attach fuel line to port on the top of the pump module and extend it to the new pump
  • attach return line to port and run it to where the new pump is.
  • cut the positive wire in the harness for the old fuel pump and extend it to where the new pump is.
  • tap a wire off of the ground for the old pump and run it to the new pump.
  • install fuel filter inline coming from tank
  • attach line coming from fuel filter to the "in" port on the new pump
  • add a line to the "out" port on the new pump and attach it to the "in" port on the regulator
  • attach return line to return port on the regulator
  • attach last line to the "out" port on the regulator
  • connect positive and ground wires to new pump
  • make sure pressure regulator is turned all the way down
  • reconnect battery
  • turn key on and verify that pump runs for 2 seconds then turn key off and wait 10 seconds and then back on again. Do this several times
  • start car, DO NOT step on accelerator
  • adjust regulator so gauge reads 60PSI
  • wipe sweat off of forehead, take a deep breath, go and grab a beer to reward yourself for a job well done
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Where there is a will there is a way!
Exactly! You wouldn't believe how many times a week I have to tell myself this because I'm too cheap to hire anyone and get into projects I shouldn't be doing. Especially involving my house.
You're a total lifesaver. I am going to start researching how I am going to go about this.
 

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I gave you the link for the fuel pumps. get one that moves 300+ LPH
I gave you the link for the fuel pressure regulator
I also gave you the link for the return port that you have to add to the tank.

You will need a fuel filter. Glass ones are nice and can be taken apart and cleaned.
You will need some wire to extend the pump wiring.
You are going to need 3/8" fuel line
I don't remember off hand what the line size that is in the car. it could be 3/8" or it could be 1/2" you are going to need that as well.
If you are dealing with rubber line in the car you will need barb to barb fittings in the same size as the line. If you have to deal with plastic line at all in the vehicle let me know and I will point you to the proper connectors for those.

I am going to recommend you use these clamps for everything

113507


They are called a high pressure fuel line clamp get the sizes needed for the lines.

The first thing I would do is I would cut a piece of wood that you can mount everything to and get everything mounted to it and it mounted in the car. This way you can size everything properly. You will want to secure any wiring and fuel lines so they can't bounce around and rub on anything.
 

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I can walk you through step by step exactly what you need to do and how to do it so don't worry.

This is my own personal car that I did the work on. I rerouted the engine harness, all the coolant lines are stainless steel and the turbo has been upgraded just to name a few things. It might make you feel somewhat better knowing that I do have some automotive knowledge.

113508
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
You are unreal! I see you added step by step instructions to the previous post. Don't worry, I already knew you had a whole other level of automotive knowledge from your very first posts. After seeing that photo, I really need to step my game up. I usually just add some chrome brackets and red wires and think I'm the ****. Nope.
I will order the parts you linked tonight or tomorrow. I am going to get this process rolling asap. I just really want this garage spot back, lol. I'm tired of having to work on everything out in 110 degree heat or 60 mph winds.
The battery sits inside the trunk instead of the engine. I already disconnected it and moved it completely away from the area. I wasn't going to risk any sparks if I bumped it with everything exposed.
I have some spools of different size fuel line so I should have what I need. I have tons of wire too. I saw those clamps on the fuel line underneath. I have bins and bins of hose clamps that I use on everything but I witnessed an intense lecture on someone else's post to never use those, so I will order some of the high pressure ones.
Everything on the list sounds doable. While I am waiting for parts, I will start draining the tank and getting it cleaned out. I think I can weasel my arm around the current pump. An advantage of being thin since strength fails me.
If you direct message me an address or something, I will seriously send you payment for all the effort you have put into this.
 

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You don't need to pay me anything. I enjoy sharing the knowledge I have.


As far as cleaning the tank is concerned. I would siphon the gas out and then put a decent amount of water in the tank. 4 gallons or so. the crappy gas leftovers should float on top of the water so if you can skim the top or siphon the top that would be ideal. You will need a sizeable container to hold the water from the tank. so skim/siphon the top first then siphon the tank completely and while doing it use the hose to break up anything that might be on the bottom. Let the water sit in the container for about an hour any gasoline will float on top and anything else should sink to the bottom. pour off or ladle off the gasoline into a different container and reuse the same water in the tank.

It's gonna be a pain to get the tank clean. There is probably a large chunk of foam inside the tank as well which is going to make it difficult to clean. This is why I stated to get a glass fuel filter. fir off is so you can see if there is anything in it, and second is because you can open it and clean the filter off.

 

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Hello and sorry in advance for the long post, but I have been troubleshooting all week and am now stuck. I have a 2007 Solstice GXP Manual with less than 10,000 miles on it that is cranking but won’t start. I have done a lot of work on old 60’s/70’s cars, but this is my first time working on a new car, so I am trying to learn as I go thanks to this forum. The car hasn’t been started in about 4-5 years. Yes, I know this is terrible, but my dad (who owned it) was sick for a long time and couldn’t drive it. He never recovered and passed away a couple years ago. I haven’t touched it until now. It was kept in a garage in Vegas the entire time where it is warm most of the year. The gas had been drained and battery removed for storage. I filled the tank up halfway and bought a new battery and it cranked but wouldn’t run. To be fair, I would have been shocked if it did start. Here is what I have done so far:
  1. Checked the warning lights. The yellow check engine is on, but I believe that is normal until it fires up. Other than that, it is just the brake and seatbelt warnings. No security icon that would indicate that I’m locked out.
  2. All the rubber hoses still look and feel like new. Despite sitting so long, there isn’t a single stain on the floor, so nothing has been leaking. No rodents have ever been in the garage.
  3. I can hear the fuel pump every time I turn the key on.
  4. I disconnected the fuel line under the car (by the rear tire) and turned the key. Gas shot out onto the floor, so it is making its way out of the tank.
  5. After an embarrassing amount of time, I finally found the spark plugs and checked them. All 4 were badly fouled so I replaced them. No improvement.
  6. I went to the store and bought a code reader. Zero codes! Wasn’t the point of these overly complicated computer cars is that they would tell you what was wrong with them, lol. Is it possible that I need a better reader? I bought the cheapest one they had for $60 since I would only use it one time (Innova 3020rs)
  7. I looked over the entire engine and found the PCV was busted off. Not sure if it was like that the entire time or if I broke it while changing the spark plugs. I researched online and found no evidence that this would cause a failure to start. Just some oil leaking and emissions issues while driving. I will replace it, I just don’t think that is the problem.
  8. Engine ground had a weird gooey residue all over it that came out of the cable. It looked like honey that had hardened. I scraped it all off, but no change. Not sure if that has affected the whole cable inside.
  9. I checked the Schrader valve and had no fuel came out. Turned the key a few times and still nothing. This can be a few things apparently, so I don’t want to rip the HPFP out unless I know that is the trouble since I hear it working. If I have low fuel pressure, shouldn’t I have gotten a code? Is it possible I have fuel problems AND a bad computer?
  10. I noticed the RPM needle doesn’t move while cranking. Possible crankshaft sensor failure? It seems some cars are supposed to show movement and some don’t, but I don’t know about the Solstice. Is there any way to test the crankshaft sensor?
Its a mess. How do I narrow down from here and what should I start with? I have a bad feeling it is multiple issues. Should I try getting a new ECM first and see if I can get codes? Also, is it OK to use starting fluid on these cars?
I let mine sit too long and needed a new ECU it corroded
 

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several reasons. The top section that is not seen in the photos is attached to the hood. So when I close the hood the opening gets sealed up. I used trunk weatherstripping for the seal so when the top and bottom meet it's watertight.

I cut the top off so that the front of the car can flex without cracking the liners. It allows the side connected to the bumper to move without putting any stress on the side connected to the fender. I do know that removing the screws and putting in push pins stops the cracking from happening I didn't like the idea of the fender liner being able to wiggle around and it rubbing against the lip on the fender. I live on a dirt road and when the sand/dirt gets in between the liner and the fender (which it does) if the liner moves around the paint is going to get sanded off of the fender exposing the metal to the elements and would lead to the fender rotting out.

I also removed the tops because I got tired having to hunt for the tools I set down and they slid off. They always seem to get stuck in the worst place and the frustration of fishing the tool out was starting to irritate me. so now if a tool falls it is falling off the top of the tire and the only place for it to go is the ground. easy to find it and easy to recover it.

It is also a back saver. I am now able to kneel on the top of the tire to work on the car. you can't kneel on the liner because it will crack.

I also think it looks pretty bad ass seeing the tops of the tires when the hood gets opened up.
 

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several reasons. The top section that is not seen in the photos is attached to the hood. So when I close the hood the opening gets sealed up. I used trunk weatherstripping for the seal so when the top and bottom meet it's watertight.

I cut the top off so that the front of the car can flex without cracking the liners. It allows the side connected to the bumper to move without putting any stress on the side connected to the fender. I do know that removing the screws and putting in push pins stops the cracking from happening I didn't like the idea of the fender liner being able to wiggle around and it rubbing against the lip on the fender. I live on a dirt road and when the sand/dirt gets in between the liner and the fender (which it does) if the liner moves around the paint is going to get sanded off of the fender exposing the metal to the elements and would lead to the fender rotting out.

I also removed the tops because I got tired having to hunt for the tools I set down and they slid off. They always seem to get stuck in the worst place and the frustration of fishing the tool out was starting to irritate me. so now if a tool falls it is falling off the top of the tire and the only place for it to go is the ground. easy to find it and easy to recover it.

It is also a back saver. I am now able to kneel on the top of the tire to work on the car. you can't kneel on the liner because it will crack.

I also think it looks pretty bad ass seeing the tops of the tires when the hood gets opened up.

Thanks,

It all makes sense, specially kneeling on the tire.

Carlos
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Just a little update while I'm still waiting for all my parts. I cleaned out the fuel tank and there was NO gunk in there at all. All the gas was the same color as what I recently put in so it didn't mix in or lift what might have been in there. I stuck my head in as far as I could with a flash light and the bottom of the tank is completely white. There is nothing to scrape or wipe out at all. I feel slightly redeemed that I did manage to get all the gas out last time. I tilted the pump assembly as much as I could until I could see through the gaps to the fuel sock. It is completely dried out and disintegrating. Anywhere I poke it with my finger crumbles to dust. I guess it was just pieces of the sock that clogged everything up. We do have a really dry air here, but I thought the garage would save it as it stays a lot cooler in there. Apparently not.

Its a bummer, but in the long run, the external pump will be much better considering the poor design of this kit car.
 

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well it's good to know that you don't have to try and fumble around with cleaning the tank. That would have been a royal pain to do without having the tank out of the car then couple that with having to work around that hangar assembly. Not a job I would have wanted.

That fuel sock sounds like it is probably the cause. If you could get onto the backside of the check valve and pour gasoline down the pipe going to the pump it might push the pieces out that are stuck in the pump. IDK if you can get a new fuel sock attached tho. It might not be worth messing around with.

You do have to extend the line going to the pump so it will reach the bottom of the tank.

When you have gotten to the point of needing the wiring diagram for the tank harness lemme know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
I considered trying to clean it out and get a new filter on there, but it seems like something that will always be a problem since the pump can't come out. It was also not easy taking the whole trunk out. I think the future owner will appreciate having access to everything right under the car.

I believe the wire for power is the gray one on the bigger harness. A diagram wouldn't hurt though to be sure. For ground, I was just going to attach to the battery since it is right next to everything.

I have a couple questions about the regulator. Is it OK to put it towards the rear of the car? Generally they are supposed to be in the engine area, but I have limited access under the hood (which is way smaller than normal) and don't think I can get it in there. Also, there is a vacuum line. Can I just plug it off or do need to run it all they way up to the engine?

Thanks again
 

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The regulator on the Solstice is on that pump module in the tank. So I don't think it is going to be an issue mounting everythign in the back. The service manual calls for between 50 and 60 PSI. I told you to dial it in to 60 to account for pressure drop across the length of the line to the HPFP (High Pressure Fuel Pump).

I am going to check the wiring diagrams because there is one thing that concerns me. It's not too big of a deal, just more work you would have to do. When plugging in an OBDII scan tool that scan tool negotiates the protocol and then it asks the car what OBDII commands it supports. The kappas report back an incorrect list of supported PIDs. The PID for fuel pressure is supported but this is the fuel pressure reading for the HPFP. I have come to discover that if you use the PID for fuel pressure on a diesel vehicle it reports the LPFP pressure reading. I do not know if this is needed by the ECM of the car. I wouldn't think so because of no fuel is getting to the HPFP then it is going to throw a code for low fuel rail pressure. The LPFP is not a variable speed pump so it doesn't use the reading for adjusting the LPFP at all. If the car complains at all if it is unable to read the pressure then you are going to have to remove the pressure sensor from the fuel pump module and relocate it to after the new pressure regulator. I really think it is going to be a non issue and everything will work as it should without having to relocate that pressure sensor. I think that pressure sensor exists only for the purpose of diagnosing a failed LPFP. because you will have a gauge attached to the new pressure regulator it is going to be easy enough to check so an electronic one is not really needed.

I would also say to ground the new pump on the wire that is grounding the old pump that way the wiring is how it should be.

What year is your car and is it a GXP?
 

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There should not be a vacuum line on the regulator. If there is I would put a T in the EVAP line on top of the old fuel pump assembly and connect it there.

Give me the brand and model number of the regulator and also the pump you are getting, I want to take a look at it. Also mount everything in that area you showed in the photos next to the tank. You do not want it under the car at all. You want to keep it protected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
Car is a 2007 GXP.

I tried to find a regulator without the vacuum line but they all seem to have it, including the one you linked. I ended up getting the K Motor universal 30-90 psi regulator. The pump is a Walbro GSL396 350lph.

I always thought it was best for the pumps to be below the tank. If I mount it on the side it will be close to level with the top of the tank. If that won't hurt, it would be nice to not have to lay under everything.

I'm not sure which is the ground on the wiring harness. I will have to check.
 

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check and see of the pump is self priming. If it isn't then you would want to to be near the bottom of the tank. Most inline pumps re self priming but double check anyhow.
 

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also are you sure that vacuum line is a vacuum line and not a return. The one I l;inked to had 3 connections, it had an IN and an OUT and a RETURN. In is fuel coming from the pump, out is fuel that heads to the engine and return is where excess fuel gets returned back to the gas tank. Fuel pressure regulators do not regulate pressure so to speak. It redirects excess pressure back to the fuel tank.

The return you DO NOT want to tap into the EVAP lines for. You need to drill a hole in the top of the tank and add a return bulkhead. I linked to a kit for the return bulkhead and hoses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Will check the pump info. Their website isn't specifying if it is or not.

The regulator has the in/out/return AND a small metal tube towards the top for vacuum. If you check the one you linked on Amazon, they call it a 5/32" vacuum/boost port. It is supposed to connect to the manifold somewhere. Hoping I can just cap it off. I did order the return kit, just waiting for it to get here.
 

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Ahh ok cool. If you connect it to the EVAP line at the tank then it will be connected to the manifold.

I will check on that vacuum line connection for ya and see what it says. While I have put inline pumps in place I have never messed about with an aftermarket pressure regulator.
 
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