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OK So at about what point is the fuel gauge arrow when your dashboard low-fuel warning light comes on please?
Give 'em Hell John!
 

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When the low fuel light comes on it would be a good idea to be pulling into a gas station.
 

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When the low fuel light comes on it would be a good idea to be pulling into a gas station.
Or bring a friend to help push. ;)
 
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All cars are different but generally you can go several miles with that light on. Best bet is to assume that the light means what it says and get some gas. My nissan will go almost fifty miles before it actually runs out. Don't ask how I know this.
 

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I've seen mine once, and put in 12.6 gallons, one less than the full rated volume in, about 4 miles after it came on. Not much left when it does, obviously.
Going any distance after the FUEL LOW warning on the DIC shows up (at about 40 miles on the range estimate) puts the fuel pump at risk of overheating, so I try to avoid that, as well.
 

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OK Good deal Win, I got it down to about 1/4 tank. Just wondering how low I could go before topping it off to leave for the summer with a new bottle of gas-treatment and Sta-bil fuel storage fluid. That Ford Focus is the only one I ever let the light come on, and turns out I didn't have much time. It took 11.7 gallons for a 12 gallon tank. I also had to get a new gas cap this year when the engine light came on in the Solstice. I also got one of them battery-minder trickle charger / de-sulfators to hook up.

I've seen mine once, and put in 12.6 gallons, one less than the full rated volume in, about 4 miles after it came on. Not much left when it does, obviously.
Going any distance after the FUEL LOW warning on the DIC shows up (at about 40 miles on the range estimate) puts the fuel pump at risk of overheating, so I try to avoid that, as well.
 

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To add running the Solstice or any new car for that matter low on fuel will cause premature wear and eventual failure of the fuel pump which is located in the tank and uses the fuel to cool it . I never run any of my cars below a quarter tank .
 

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yes,

mine came on last night !

I do not intentionally do this, but as it is my second car; I don't have a typical weekly fill up schedule. not sure as to how much is left, I generally look to fill up within 10 miles whenever a car i'm driving displays that.
 

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It doesn't come on until the gauge reads almost empty, happened to me a couple of times when I didn't realize it was that low (gauge can be hard to read in full sun, top down). When the light comes on......get gas as soon as possible!!
 

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To add running the Solstice or any new car for that matter low on fuel will cause premature wear and eventual failure of the fuel pump which is located in the tank and uses the fuel to cool it . I never run any of my cars below a quarter tank .
The "modern" fuel pumps are cooled (and lubricated) by fuel running through them, not by being submerged in fuel. And in any regards, it only takes about half a gallon to submerge most pumps since they tend to live in some sort of sump.

And before anyone makes some unsubstantiated comment about "picking up sediment from the tank bottom" - your pump always picks up fuel from the tank bottom. Otherwise it wouldn't work.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
OK Lee, just curious, do you remember how much fuel it took to fill it up after your light came on?
THANKS TO YOU ALL
 

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OK Lee, just curious, do you remember how much fuel it took to fill it up after your light came on?
THANKS TO YOU ALL
I was on a parkway at 80 MPH, just under 10 miles from the exit with a gas station, when the light came on. I put 12.7 gallons into what is supposed to be a 13 gallon tank.
 

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My experience as well. according to the DIC "miles to empty" I had at least 20 miles of fuel left when I got home. The light came on about 15 miles to go and I pulled into a gas station with 8 miles to go. Using the auto shut off on the pump I put in just short of 13 gallons. I probably could have got more in there but I know better.
 

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Many fuel injection pumps are very poor at self priming so do try and not run the tank dry (don't know if the Solstice is one of these).

I used to drive an old (1960s) Jaguar that had two gas tanks, two fuel pumps and a dash switch to switch between tanks. That meant that you still had half your fuel when the light went on. Unfortunately it also meant that if you had already drained the other tank and had forgotten to refill it, you felt twice the fool.
 

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The "modern" fuel pumps are cooled (and lubricated) by fuel running through them, not by being submerged in fuel. And in any regards, it only takes about half a gallon to submerge most pumps since they tend to live in some sort of sump.

And before anyone makes some unsubstantiated comment about "picking up sediment from the tank bottom" - your pump always picks up fuel from the tank bottom. Otherwise it wouldn't work.
You are correct and that was my point "it's cooled by the fuel in the tank " I just didn't want to get too technical .When I was working our mechanics had issues with guys running the trucks low on fuel and burning up the fuel pumps I stick by my statement I've never let any of my cars run below a quarter tank , I've never replaced a fuel pump since they placed them in the tanks .
 

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I have one car that is a rebodied 1950s MG that I fitted with a GM V6 engine. To feed the injection, rather than cut and weld the gas tank to fit an in tank pump, I use an electric priming pump that keeps a reservoir of gas filled above the level of the high pressure pump, which then feeds the HP pump which is mounted along the frame of the car. That type doesn't need to be immersed in gas, just to have a flow of it going through it. It is a return system so the flow is constant. Might not work if it was a returnless set up.
 

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Two other things to keep in mind:
  1. The fuel gauge really isn't. The value displayed is not the level of fuel in the tank, it is a graphic representation of the range to empty. Radical changes in rate of fuel consumption can cause significant swings in the displayed "level".
  2. The gauge is quite sensitive to the tilt of the car, especially at fuel levels of less than one half. If you park on a hill, the gauge will indicate either higher or lower than actual when you start out, and will normalize over time.
 

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Many fuel injection pumps are very poor at self priming so do try and not run the tank dry (don't know if the Solstice is one of these).

I used to drive an old (1960s) Jaguar that had two gas tanks, two fuel pumps and a dash switch to switch between tanks. That meant that you still had half your fuel when the light went on. Unfortunately it also meant that if you had already drained the other tank and had forgotten to refill it, you felt twice the fool.
Wspohn, when I used to have a propane BBQ I had an extra tank so I could get a refill before the second tank ran out. I inevitably would forget and have to take both tanks for a refill at the same time all while feeling the fool.

I ran a natural gas line and now have a natural gas grill. :sneaky:
 
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