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Yes,
LLLFLY
 

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How do you wash your car?

Swirl marks are very hard to avoid totally, but actual scratches is a different matter. Given proper hand washing with microfiber towels it should not scratch.

Do you visit the local car wash with the car?
 

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I'm with Rob. Proper washing methods and care should not result in major scratches. My Sol is Mysterious (black) and even with it's tendency to show EVERY defect it's in pretty good shape.

One thing I learned is to not do the "wax on wax off" circles when washing or waxing - that creates swirl marks.

Get a good dual action buffer, pads and compound to buff them out. Then wax and use a sealant. I sealed my paint this past March and it lasted until this month. It does make a difference.
 

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I have a couple dings on the sly one and you can tell that the paint is think. however on my cool one, just looking at the hood, it almost looks as if they could have put one more coat on it. haven't had any new scratches appear though.
 

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If you have deep scratches(your finger nail can catch) you will not be able to correct them with a machine. You are most likely looking at a paint job or a do it yourself scratch repair. If the scratches are not deep you will be able to get them out with a good DA buffer(not a cheap Sears model), some good pads, and a good polish. DO NOT use rubbing compound unless you have used this before and know what you are doing. You can make the paint worse and then you will need a paint job. Check out Autogeek.net, they have just about every product you could ever need and even have some how to videos. I personally like the XMT series from pinnacle, works well and doesn't cost an arm and a leg.
 

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If you have deep scratches(your finger nail can catch) you will not be able to correct them with a machine. You are most likely looking at a paint job or a do it yourself scratch repair. If the scratches are not deep you will be able to get them out with a good DA buffer(not a cheap Sears model), some good pads, and a good polish. DO NOT use rubbing compound unless you have used this before and know what you are doing. You can make the paint worse and then you will need a paint job. Check out Autogeek.net, they have just about every product you could ever need and even have some how to videos. I personally like the XMT series from pinnacle, works well and doesn't cost an arm and a leg.
I've seen a lot of videos explaining rubbing compound. I've never heard anyone say you can damage your paint with it. What's the risk and how do I avoid it?
 

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Thanks all good information. I cleaned a spot and put a small scratch. Just seems a little sensitive. And I am talking about my car? Funny.
 

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I've seen a lot of videos explaining rubbing compound. I've never heard anyone say you can damage your paint with it. What's the risk and how do I avoid it?
Rubbing compound is abrasive and is intended for removing oxidation or taking down a new paint repair to the surrounding paint level.

I have seen people that didn't know what they were doing apply it to an electric polisher and 'burn' the paint or even polish right through it. If you haven't done this before, be careful.
 

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I'm with Rob. Proper washing methods and care should not result in major scratches. My Sol is Mysterious (black) and even with it's tendency to show EVERY defect it's in pretty good shape.

One thing I learned is to not do the "wax on wax off" circles when washing or waxing - that creates swirl marks.

Get a good dual action buffer, pads and compound to buff them out. Then wax and use a sealant. I sealed my paint this past March and it lasted until this month. It does make a difference.
I agree a dual action polisher works wonders along w/choosing the correct polish for what your goal is. GriotsGarage offers 2 different orbital polishers (large and small) 4 different abrasives polishes, plus wax and carnuba wax.

Below link has about 50 demonstration videos that shows how to clean every part of your car. Also, gives an idea of why detailing by a professional detailer can run into the hundreds to thousands of dollars.
Videos - Griot's Garage
 

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I've seen a lot of videos explaining rubbing compound. I've never heard anyone say you can damage your paint with it. What's the risk and how do I avoid it?
What wspohn said. I've seen black cars turn to gray in a heart beat. There is a time a place for rubbing compounds but I don't think this is it. I would have to see pics before saying he needs rubbing compound.
 

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:agree::agree::agree:

The rule. Use the least aggressive product that works. You can work up, but you don't want to smoke your paint 'cause that means you have to replace it.
 

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Correct, that's one reason I posted the Griots link vid. It's explains that their orbital polishers work at a much lower speeds than high speed professional polishers. Reason being, professionals through experience have learned how much pressure and speed to apply. The Griots orbital polisher (and other products similar to it) are designed for the home hobbyist and do not generate the speed and resulting torque to generate heat that can literally burn though the paint and primer that professional polishers are capable of doing.

The below vids shows the host explaining why you can't damage your finish even if you try. Basically, the orbital polishers don't have the torque and if you press down too hard they stop.
 

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What do you guys suggest for the bare bottom of the front bumper?

Details: My driveway's curb is about ... Oh, I'd say probably an inch or two off the street and every time I drive down my driveway onto the street my front bumper scratches (and you can hear the paint rub off... Just makes me heart tear) and when you look under it you can see the concrete scratches. This is around the area of the bumper where the screws(?) are, or the little nuts and bolts that are under the front of the car.

Regardless, what would you guys suggest? Just sanding it and painting it, or fixing the scratches with epoxy and then sand & paint. And actually, I had a suggestion. Is it possible to sand it down just a little further (the bottom of the bumper) and paint it thin so it wouldn't reach the curb? OR I see how some people raise their car, I believe it's called the suspension? (excuse my lack of knowledge towards cars) but just lift the car an inch or two for this problem AND for rain problems, since our car is so low to the ground and that's a huge mess on it's own..

Thanks!
 

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If you don't address the curb, there's no need to paint - you'll just scratch it back up again.

I wouldn't suggest lifting the vehicle. That will affect it's handling.
 
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