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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
It has taken me some time to get it close to being finished. It was a HUGE amount of trial and error and with trial and error comes a lot of additional cost. I have not been able to operate the vehicle at all because of the lack of headlights, I have made a couple of short drives around the block but that is about it. I have to get the thing put back together so I can bring it to body shops to quote the paint for it. When I fond a place. Then I have to take it all apart again.. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
OK so I have one housing close to being finished. I still have to add the LED turn signals to it. All the electronics are installed and all of the mechanicals are done. The wiring harness for the headlight is made. I still have to do some work in the car like mounting the HID ballasts and cracking open the fuse box to add 2 fuses to it. I have to tap an ignition wire and also the 2 data wires, all of the rest of the connections are plug in.

The LED turn signals are going to be interesting to deal with. Because of the number of LED's in the turn signal it's going to get hot, and that coupled with what is already going to be high temperatures inside of the housing I run a really high chance of cooking the LED's. This is what I came up with for a solution to the heat issue.

I got some aluminum heat sink that is 14mm wide and 10mm tall and 80mm long. This is going to be mounted on the outside of the housing under where the turn signal is going to be. I am going to put a thin strip of aluminum on the inside of the housing so it lines up with where the heatsink it. I am going to put a screw through the aluminum strip through the housing and into the heatsink. The heatsink is going to have some butyl rubber on the back side of it so no water can get into the housing. The trick here is the screws I am using. They are flat head aluminum screws so they will be flush with the top of the strip inside the housing. One screw per pixel (4 LEDS). I got a roll of tape that is non conductive and is also a thermal paste. This is what I am going to use to attach the LEDs to the aluminum strip on the inside of the housing. Because cold absorbs hot the heat should get pulled through the aluminum screws, or at least I am hoping it is going to do that.

Here are some more photos.

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If you look at the middle photo you can see the flat ish area where I am going to put the turn signal. It is along the front edge of the housing.
If you look at the second photo you can see the textured area along the bottom edge. The turn signals are going to be sitting under that area. I am hoping that when I lite the LEDs up the light is going to travel up that texture and cause the top edge of it to glow. This would make the turn signal so it appears to be a really thin line along the bottom of the headlights. I am going to have to fashion up a reflector to keep the stray light from going into the rest of the housing, that's not a big deal to make.

My system is what controls the turning on and off of the headlights and also the high beams and turn signals. Because of the low voltage output from the processor I had to use a relay setup that is optocoupler isolated. This allows me to use a 5 volt coil on the relay and also use a low current trigger to turn the relay on. The larger the amperage rating on the relay the more current it takes to trigger the relay. It being isolated also keeps the electronics safe and no voltage from say the field collapsing on the coil from back feeding into the electronics.

I was going to put the connector into the side of the housing and changed my mind. It was going to get way to cramped in there if I did. So I made the connector inline and the car side of the connector is going to be mounted to the bumper cover support bracket in the car. he connector is a 22 pin sealed weatherpac connector. I have the crimpers to attach the pins. Planning the wiring and how it was going to be run and where things were going to go did take some time, I also had to change my circuit board design because of the new relay setup I used. There is also a pretty significant amount of current that is going to be flowing through everything. The peak current is going to be close to 30 amps per headlamp. That is a momentary draw and it should settle down to < 20 amps. This is per headlamp housing.

If you zoom into the first photo you can see a marker light. I opened up the lens on it (pain in the a$$ to do) and painted the backing flat black. I then attached 11 RGBW LED pixels inside and attached a water tight connector to the housing for the marker light. The marker light is going to be a marker light and also a turn signal.

The LED's I am using are RGBW Pixels, this means that they have a red, green, blue and white LED packaged into a single "chip". There is also a microprocessor embedded into each pixel, this processor is what handles the lighting of each LED. the pixels are daisy chained together and only 1 wire is used to control all of the pixels. each pixel has it's own address so I can pick a single pixel and tell it to light up to one of 4,228,250,625 possible colors. Pretty cool stuff.
 
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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
pain in the a$$ is what it is. trying to put 10 lbs of poop into a 5 lb bag.
Keeping the projectors from hitting anything when they move has been the single biggest challenge. The second was coming up with a method for extending the housing without using any kind of a glue or adhesive. I spent many many many hours practicing technique to get the pieces welded together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
I like the way the exposed electronics look, so I am not going to make any kind of a bezel to cover them. It will make the car look kinda "digital" if you get my meaning. If I do decide to cover the electronics all I am going to do is mask out the inside of the lens and shoot it with black epoxy paint. I can make it look angry if I do that. I would like a second set of lenses to see if it would look good as it would be really hard to get the epoxy paint off the inside of the lens.
 

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I like the way the exposed electronics look, so I am not going to make any kind of a bezel to cover them. It will make the car look kinda "digital" if you get my meaning. If I do decide to cover the electronics all I am going to do is mask out the inside of the lens and shoot it with black epoxy paint. I can make it look angry if I do that. I would like a second set of lenses to see if it would look good as it would be really hard to get the epoxy paint off the inside of the lens.
That is an amazing piece of work! Keep the pics and info coming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
I have to finish up a project on my house and then I will get back to working on the headlights. I was cleaning out my basement and I kept on smacking my head on some duct work for the HVAC, So I am running it differently so I will not kit my head on it. I am trying to make room so I can clean off my back porch, it has a plethora of Solstice parts on it that need moving. I have a 2011 Hyundai Genesis 3.8 GT that I am thinking I am going to tear down and part out. I wanted to teach someone from the younger generation how to fix it and give the car to them when it was finished. I really need a garage to do that and that is what I don't have. and with lumber prices the way they are I am not going to be building a garage like I wanted to this summer. I was also planning on putting an adition on my house this summer and that is going to get put on hold as well. Lumber being 450% higher then it was a year ago squashed my plans. I need some pretty large beams for my addition and they were going to cost a mint before the prices went up.
 
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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
I have spent a little time this evening working on this project. I have the heat sink all made up for the LED's I have to drill the holes for the screws still. The I put the LED's in and I have to do some really fine soldering work to connect the LED segments together. It was one strip but in order to get it to kind of match the curve of the housing I had to put several cuts in it. Once that is done I have to power up the step down and adjust the voltage to get it to 5 volts. and then one thing at a time I have to connect them to the power supply and double check the voltage and adjust it up if needed.

I have my fingers crossed that the power supply is going to hold up, If it doesn't I will have to make new ones from scratch. I will have to do some research and learn how to make a super efficient one so it doesn't get hot. I did upgrade the heat sink on the ones I currently have in the housings.. Gonna have to wait and see how it plays out. All of the electronics can handle up to 6 volts. If I am able to draw 4 amps out of these power supplies and the voltage stays above 4 volts then I should be good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
I have the first of 5 sections of heat sink installed. I think it is going to work..

I have some good news on the power supply. Well I think I do anyway. The description states 5amps the specs state 75 watts maximum, but ideally stay at under 60 watts. the specs also state that is with a 24 volt supply and a 12 volt output. so 60 watts / 12 volts = 5.0 amps. So 60 watts / 5 volts = 12 amps. There should be enough available power.
 
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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
The LEDs are installed into the one housing. The way I am transferring the heat through the housing looks like it is going to work well. Here are some photos.

You can see the aluminum strips at the lower edge This is what the LEDs are going to sit on top of.

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Here are a couple of shots of the heat sinks

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As you can see it's not flat but the 10mm wide heat sink wasn't hard to bend into place. I used some pretty beefy screws and I undersized the holes so when screwing them in they had to drill and tap the hole. This made for a super sight connection between the screw aand the heat sink. On the inside strip the holes are tapered and the screws are a flat head, they sit flush and there is also a wider contact patch between the screw and the aluminum strip.

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I located a roll of 10mm wide double side adhesive thermal tape that is non conductive, this is what is holding the LED strips down. Each one of those white squares contains 4 LED's; red, green, blue, and white. I believe there are 32 pixels in total which is 128 LEDs

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These next photos show what I was talking about with the headlamp lens and what I am trying to acomplish. You can see along the lower edge of the lens vertical lines, these vertical lines should carry the light up to where they stop. Those lines sir below the bumper cover when the hood is closed and are not seen I am hoping that enough of the light will follow up those lines and light the ends up bright enough. If it works it is going to look like a bunch super tiny LED's when up close. and when standing back a few feet it will look more like a 1mm wide line of light. I still have to make a reflector so it will concentrate the light into the bottoms of the lines. I might have to polish the bottoms of the lines so that the light can enter them easier and make the top edge of the lines hazy so it will glow. going to have to spray the outside of the lens along that bottom edge with some black paint so the light doesn't shine out where I don't want it to.

I have to clean off the old butyl that was used to seal the lens to the housing

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making a reflector should be pretty easy to do because of how the LED strip sits.
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I think this is going to do what I want it to. The stock turn signal bulb outputs about 402 lumen and the strip outputs 31.4159 lumen per pixel or 1005.30 lumen for the entire strip. I think it should be more then bright enough even after loses are considered.
 
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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
OK so I decided not to risk a power supply meltdown. My concern is pushing the power supply coupled with the heat that is going to be inside of this housing. I removed the heatsink it came with and put a larger one one. and I also added one to help keep the coil cool. I went a step above that and I added a second power supply that is dedicated to the marker light and the DRL/Turn light. I had to remake the power distribution board again to accommodate the second power supply.

It got a bit tricky because I wanted to only have the one power supply powered up and powering only the processor when the car is not in operation.Even if there is nothing happening the power supply does draw some current and I want to keep that to an absolute minimum. So I needed to add another relay that would switch the 12v on and off that goes to the second power supply. Here was the issue. All 4 relays on the board o bought were being used so no extra there. I do have relays but the problem is the processor only has 40ma it can supply on one of the GPIO pins, the relay requires 60ma. One of the 4 relays switches on and off the 5 volts that feeds the servo controller, can interface and the 9 axis motion sensor. So I decided to use the 5 volts coming from that relay to trigger another relay that feeds the 12 volts to the second power supply.

I still have o dial in the output for the power supplies which is no big deal. I am working on the second headlamp now. I am almost finished with the car side of the wiring harness, only thing left is to make the bracket for it. Then I will assemble the headlamp side of the harness and put the LED's in . Then it is just wiring from there.

I am going to lock the servos in place and get the code all finalized for powering the headlights and also get the code finalized for the turn signals. I want to make sure there are no errors of problems with that portion of it before I move onto getting the things to move properly.

I think I am going to have to come up with a larger friction setup to reduce unwanted movement. I think the washers I am using are too thin and they are flexing to much I might try doubling them up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
I have been working on the second power distribution board. It takes a while to make one of these things. Here is the reason why.

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I am sure @TomatoSoup would agree. The planning take a long time as well. I used a PCB design software to help out, it is still a lot o adding and deleting to get the traces to run correctly to complete a circuit. I don't have the ability in house to make a printed board so I have to use a prototype board and make the traces myself. I could have used wire to do but doing it the way I did looks better I think. Technically speaking I did use wire. I used solid 20 gauge and soldered it down and then filed it flat so you get what you see above. There is going to be quite a bit of current passing through this thing. upwards of 5 amps for the electronics and the LED's and then another 20amps for the HID ballasts. The current for the ballasts is only going to move across the board maybe 2mm to 3mm or so. not very far but it still does go through the board.
 

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Have you thought of just making your own boards? You just need blank copper-clad PCB, a laser printer, a clothes iron and some Ferric chloride to etch. Addmittedly, you might still want to reinforce the high-current tracks though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Yeah I have, I didn't want to mess around with having to use any chemicals I would have to dispose of. I live 20 minutes to the closest gas station so it's not exactly convenient to have to get rid of those kinds of things.

I have gotten pretty good at using prototype PCB's and making the traces
 

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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
I am just about finished up with assembling the second headlamp. Then I have to do some circuit checks and make sure that everything is hooked up properly and make any changes that need to be made. once I am done with that then I need to write some firmware that will allow me to update the head lamps over WiFi. I have to order 2 more processors so I can iron out any bugs in the WiFi, websocket and DHCP code.
 
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Looking forward to the finished video with your moving eye boot up!
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
Being able to update them over Wifi is going to make things a whole lot easier. There is an operating system of sorts that I have flashed onto the processors, this can only be updated via USB. I did put the Processors in the housings so I could plug a USB in without having to open up the housings. I spent quite a bit of time planing and also changing my design part way through. Technically speaking this is not my first "version" There ave been several iterations and I didn't like how it was coming out so I started over.

Here is an example.
In my original design I was going to use 8 micro switches in each headlamp in order to know where the stop points were. I had an issue of not being able to know where the position of the projectors were and on startup I would have to zero them and that would cause the projector to move to fast to the zero position if it wasn't already there. I put a little bit of thought into it and said to myself how the hell does the servo know where the gears position is?? It has to have some way of knowing. So I went investigating inside the servo and found a variable resistor. I soldered a wire inside of the servo and ran it out so I could use that to know what the position is. I can also use that to know where the stops are supposed to be. It will also work to tell me if there is a servo failure. I ended up scrapping all of the mechanicals I had built because they were built to accommodate limit switches which I no longer needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
I ended up ordering a couple more processors and servo controllers. I set up a test rig so I can code up the controls for the turn signals and marker lights. The program code for both is good and had it running for 24 hours without any hiccups. I didn't like the marker lights with a single 13 pixel led strip. I like it looked like pOOp. So I took apart one of the marker lights and made a circuit board to fit inside. I cit the led strip so that I had 10 strips with 2 pixels on each strip. I attached these to the board in a diagonal kind of a fashion following the curve of the marker light. I added one additional pixel at the pointy end. Now there is a total of 23 pixels and each pixel contains a reg, green, blue and white LED making the total number of LEDs in each marker light 92.

I wrote up a cool effect for the turn signal and the marker light when it is flashing for the turn. The turn signal is knid of sequential from the center to the outside but it has a fade as the light travels across it. That fade hangs around and has a random decay to it. so different pixels in the strip will fade to black all at different speeds. It does this all within the usual amount of time of 1 second on. while the turn signal is off the marker light will light up using a modified version of the same effect but starting at either end of the marker and meeting in the middle.

I will post a video shortly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
here is a video of the marker light. I don't have the amber lens on it so the light is white. You can see the effect I am talking about

 
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