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Are you offering EFR turbo kits any more? These turbos are de rigeur on the cobalt lnf's and I hope you can work with them again.
I talked to Dave at Werks during Nationals on the subject. He said they were on hold for now, as the interest right now is on the bolt on turbo he is currently offering. They have pretty good numbers, but they are no EFR. I think maybe if you contact him, he might be willing to put together one of his former kits for you. It's a nice set up, and you won't be dissappointed. There is nothing like an EFR turbo.
 

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EFR 6758 a are great turbo for our cars.
 

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I talked to Dave at Werks during Nationals on the subject. He said they were on hold for now, as the interest right now is on the bolt on turbo he is currently offering. They have pretty good numbers, but they are no EFR. I think maybe if you contact him, he might be willing to put together one of his former kits for you. It's a nice set up, and you won't be dissappointed. There is nothing like an EFR turbo.
they are no EFR? how do you mean? because the precision stuff is just as top notch. Don't get me wrong Im not knocking the efr because its a great turbo but I really think people miss the fact precision stuff is on just about every fast drag car and on a lot of very fast road race cars. our bolt on turbos use the same bpv and so forth. biggest difference is the spool and a gamme ti wheel vs a billet wheel. Our old turbo kits are still available. call us and we can get it done for you.
Great news. I agree, EFR or nothing for me. I won't be buying right away, but I am getting my EFR options figured out. Thx
EFR 5867 a are great turbo for our cars.
6758
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
they are no EFR? how do you mean? because the precision stuff is just as top notch. Don't get me wrong Im not knocking the efr because its a great turbo but I really think people miss the fact precision stuff is on just about every fast drag car and on a lot of very fast road race cars. our bolt on turbos use the same bpv and so forth.
I guess I'm not seeing what you are. I don't want to wait to spool above 3000 rpm and I want minimal lag. Precision turbo options are better suited to larger displacement engines imo if you want minimal lag and low rpm spool. Using them on the 2.0 LNF I only see drag racing merit.

The smallest one on your web page, the Precision GT3071R has info all over the net showing spool around 3800 rpm on a 2.0 engine. Ugh. The improvement with a 2871R is still not massive. Many find spool around 3500 rpm on 2.0's with them.

biggest difference is the spool and a gamme ti wheel vs a billet wheel.
That's a big difference though. And there are lots of LNF owners who find the EFR's spool up at fairly early rpm. The 6258 especially so, but the 6758s as well.


Just for general info's sake, check out the spool on a 2.0 6758 here,
just after 4 min.
and here
and here

Lots of info here http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f63/lnf-big-turbo-swap-werks-gmtech-team-up-efr-6758-kit-68732/ The last couple pages have the most recent info.
 

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The 6758 EFR is a fabulous all around turbocharger for the 2.0 LNF, they spool very quick, provide great top end power and integrate with the OEM boost and BOV control electronics seamlessly.

It really comes down to what you are building the car for. For 90% of our customers the EFR 6758 is a top choice.
 

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the biggest draw is the spool...

the efrs use gamma ti wheels on the compressor side and usually see 500-800rpm increased spool time over other turbos of the same scale.

garret imho has awesome of stuff as they make...... imho they have been behind in the turbo game. their gtx turbos are an answer to what precision has been doing for years. don't get me wrong garret makes a great turbo as well but most of their stuff is just old technology for the most part. the efr turbos and the precision cea stuff is at the top of the game imho.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There's lots more to EFR than the spool and ti compressor wheels, but those are the big things. Google for more info.

This 5 page article hits some highlights
Beyond the Dyno: BorgWarner EFR feature set explained

Also, the EFR7163 is generating a lot of buzz for its advances. Google for a good read. Nothing in its size/hp range can touch it for early and fast spool. The 6758 is plenty for me though.
 

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There's lots more to EFR than the spool and ti compressor wheels, but those are the big things. Google for more info.

This 5 page article hits some highlights
Beyond the Dyno: BorgWarner EFR feature set explained

Also, the EFR7163 is generating a lot of buzz for its advances. Google for a good read. Nothing in its size/hp range can touch it for early and fast spool. The 6758 is plenty for me though.
The most important thing to consider, at least for me, is "time under the curve". Many turbo upgrades have an impresssive peak power number, but their torque curve is tit shaped. It's a steep rise to a maximum, and then a rapid drop. Looking at the EFR torque curves, one can see that it rises quickly, but then holds to higher rpms where the HP takes over. With the two curves overlapped, one gets a hell of a power punch from the low 3000's to 7500 rpm. Again, time under the curve is the most important thing to consider when doing a big turbo upgrade.

Yes, early and rapid spool is a very important issue when considering the EFR, but the whole package is leading edge. Considering that the Indy car's are using the EFR 6758 turbo exclusively says a lot.

LNF'n and myself are using it with stock internals and stock clutch. While he is pushing much more power than I am, we are both getting away with it because of more careful driving. Even though the flow rate of the of the 6758 suggests it's capable of almost 500 HP, one does not need to push it that hard. For me, it's nice to have the "head room" in the turbo, and if I ever do an engine build, I have a turbo upgrade that can take me to very impressive power levels for a 2 liter motor.

I would urge anyone who is considering a big turbo upgrade to consider "time under the curve" over high peak power numbers when making their choice of turbos. Again, there is nothing like an EFR.
 

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Have you done the up_grade.

The most important thing to consider, at least for me, is "time under the curve". Many turbo upgrades have an impresssive peak power number, but their torque curve is tit shaped. It's a steep rise to a maximum, and then a rapid drop. Looking at the EFR torque curves, one can see that it rises quickly, but then holds to higher rpms where the HP takes over. With the two curves overlapped, one gets a hell of a power punch from the low 3000's to 7500 rpm. Again, time under the curve is the most important thing to consider when doing a big turbo upgrade.

Yes, early and rapid spool is a very important issue when considering the EFR, but the whole package is leading edge. Considering that the Indy car's are using the EFR 6758 turbo exclusively says a lot.

LNF'n and myself are using it with stock internals and stock clutch. While he is pushing much more power than I am, we are both getting away with it because of more careful driving. Even though the flow rate of the of the 6758 suggests it's capable of almost 500 HP, one does not need to push it that hard. For me, it's nice to have the "head room" in the turbo, and if I ever do an engine build, I have a turbo upgrade that can take me to very impressive power levels for a 2 liter motor.

I would urge anyone who is considering a big turbo upgrade to consider "time under the curve" over high peak power numbers when making their choice of turbos. Again, there is nothing like an EFR.
I have a turbo upgrade that can take me to very impressive power levels for a 2 liter motor.
Can you explain?
careful driving?
;)
 
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