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Discussion Starter #1
This issue was touched on recently but some additional questions have surfaced in my mind - all are hypothetical, but still wondering what to expect over the next few months of 1st 1000 deliveries.

Its my understanding that if a 1st 1000 buyer backs out of the deal, then the dealer gets to keep the car & it is sold as one of his 1st allocation cars. If this happens, does the dealer have to sell the car under the 1st 1000 EOP rules or do those rules no longer apply since the car is a 1st allocation car?

If the EOP rules are no longer valid, then the dealership could potentially sell the car at GMS pricing as well as allow the use of GM card earnings toward the purchase even though the EOP rules specifically didn't allow this.

So, in theory, if a wife was receiving the EOP car, she backed out of the deal, the dealer decided the sell the car the the wife's husband at GMS pricing & allowed the GM card earnings to be used, wouldn't it be a better deal for the customer.

Sure its pushing the rules, but you gotta ask the questions - thats how we all learn - right :devil:

Small Dealer - let me know your thoughts!

USA
 

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USA Millionaire said:
So, in theory, if a wife was receiving the EOP car, she backed out of the deal, the dealer decided the sell the car the the wife's husband at GMS pricing & allowed the GM card earnings to be used, wouldn't it be a better deal for the customer.
USA
All within the realm of possibility, I suppose. But I don't think there is a dealer around who would even give it the slightest consideration. As soon as the EOP buyer backs out, it goes to the dealer to do with as he pleases. Why on earth he would consider selling it for LESS money when he has both a valuable promotional tool and possibly a more valuable car at his disposal is completely beyond me. Many dealers are frothing at the mouth at the chance to get hold of one of these first cars for their showroom.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The reason is simple - A dealer can actually sell a car for GMS pricing & make more profit on the deal if the customer is willing to pay GMS (+) for other options. So the customer could essentially pay the same price as MSRP, but the dealer could make more profit than if the dealer just sold the car at MSRP. This isn't common practice because most cars won't get a customer willing to pay GMS (+), but it is possible.

Can't wait to hear from Small Dealer on this one!!

USA
 
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