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Discussion Starter #1
So LS2's can be had for what $4000 right now?

I saw some companies are making kits for the engine mounts to get it into the solstice.

I know you *CAN* use the stock tranny, which I think is a bad idea, but does anyone know if its a direct bolt on to the LS2?

Are there any mechanical bits you need, like custom axels?

How long before someone with a Mallet gets out the measuring tape and helping the shade tree mechanics duplicate the install.
 

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There are going to be some kits out, like from V8archie I think?.
This should help the do it yourself people.
I would love to see a kit for the I6 Eng. for the Solstice.
 

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O.K., a tad bit off topic but related...

An old boss of mine convinced me to take a Triumph TR3 rust bucket and drop in a 215cui V-8 (from an equally rusty Buick), mate it to a two-speed muncie. He claimed to have done it...well a challenge is a challenge.

Had to make engine mount blocks, cut out the tranny hump, and have the drive shaft welded. Cut out tons of stuff to get everything to fit! Well that car went from 0-60 in a nano-second. God it was fast! Fast for about 150 feet, then there was a really bad twisting, ginding, tearing sound. No more rear end, or axle, or drive shaft. Went from 60 to 'bang' just as quick! (actually have no idea how fast it went...no speedo).

That was my first and last attempt at mating a small roadster with a big V-8. Had to pay to have it towed to a boneyard.


By the way...the 215cui was the same GM engine used in the TR8. I was told the TR8 used the TR3 frame so the conversion made sense (after a few 6 packs anyway).
 

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stang said:
:eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: Holy smokes!
I was a member and founder of a corvette club and own a few of them, and this car reminds me a little bit of the 1953 Vette, with the inline Blue Flame 6, so a Solstice with the 275HP I6 would really be a CLASSIC! :)
 

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TOY4TWO said:
So LS2's can be had for what $4000 right now?

I saw some companies are making kits for the engine mounts to get it into the solstice.

I know you *CAN* use the stock tranny, which I think is a bad idea, but does anyone know if its a direct bolt on to the LS2?

Are there any mechanical bits you need, like custom axels?

How long before someone with a Mallet gets out the measuring tape and helping the shade tree mechanics duplicate the install.
If you decide to take on this project you will need to do more than just bolt the new engine in. The new motor mounts will need to be placed in a new location requiring welding in. A new bell housing was manufactured by Mallett for his conversion. A cut and balance drive shaft will be required for the new drive line.

The hard parts that Mallett accomplished was balancing the car better than stock by removing pieces and relocating other pieces for fitment and proper operation. Even if you get through all this, you will need to create a new wiring harness and reprogram the stock computer to accept the new motor (intake, exhaust, timing, etc). The computer programming turn out to be the greatest expense of creating the conversion. For $18K you are getting one hell of an engineered conversion that would be hard for anyone to repeat.

I wish you the best of luck in taking on a project like this. Keep you eyes open to the forum over the next 2 months for news from Mallett Cars that could effect everyone considering a Mallett conversion.
 

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TerpFan said:
If you decide to take on this project you will need to do more than just bolt the new engine in. The new motor mounts will need to be placed in a new location requiring welding in. A new bell housing was manufactured by Mallett for his conversion. A cut and balance drive shaft will be required for the new drive line.

The hard parts that Mallett accomplished was balancing the car better than stock by removing pieces and relocating other pieces for fitment and proper operation. Even if you get through all this, you will need to create a new wiring harness and reprogram the stock computer to accept the new motor (intake, exhaust, timing, etc). The computer programming turn out to be the greatest expense of creating the conversion. For $18K you are getting one hell of an engineered conversion that would be hard for anyone to repeat.

I wish you the best of luck in taking on a project like this. Keep you eyes open to the forum over the next 2 months for news from Mallett Cars that could effect everyone considering a Mallett conversion.
Why must you tease us, TerpFan!? :willy: Ultimately, I would love Mallett to offer some sort of DIY kit, as I like to turn my own wrenches (do my own welding, etc) so that if something goes wrong I know how to fix it. I know that's pretty far-fetched, though. Or IS it :skep: :jester:

C'MON! Spill it!! :lurk:
 

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I love to play with cars as much as the next car nut. Watching those who are masters at it is even more fun! When specialty builders design and build something as beautiful as a Hot Rod I get weak in the knees.

Sure if you have enough money you can simply go out and buy a high performance automobile like a Z06 or Viper. Having something special as a modified Solstice or Sky gives you and your car a unique feature that goes beyond the over-the-counter sports car. A custom ride is really special.
 

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TerpFan said:
For $18K you are getting one hell of an engineered conversion that would be hard for anyone to repeat.
With all due respect, TerpFan, engine swapping is a common practice. Yes, you have to know what you're doing. No, it doesn't cost anywhere near $18,000 to DIY. There is nothing magical that makes this platform any different from the other platforms getting motor swaps.
 

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SkyCaptain said:
With all due respect, TerpFan, engine swapping is a common practice. Yes, you have to know what you're doing. No, it doesn't cost anywhere near $18,000 to DIY. There is nothing magical that makes this platform any different from the other platforms getting motor swaps.
Yup, done all the time...too bad I sucked at it :lol: . If you want to have some surfing fun look for V8 + "any tiny car you can think of". Lot's of really neat conversions out there being done by lot's of talented people. Me, I think I'll stick to changing my own oil on the Sol. (maybe a super?)
 

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I would love a Mallett conversion kit myself but I don't think Mallett wants to be in the parts production business. They probably make thier money in the installation and tuning, not the parts.

Doing it yourself really only makes sense after you've used your Solstice and got your money's worth and paid it off. Buying a brand new car and tearing it apart is kind of stupid when you think about it. The Sol will be my commuter and then maybe 100,000 miles down the road I'll buy a wrecked C5/6 and get to work. There is always a Corvette rolling chassis to buy somewhere.

If I was in the market for a $50,000 Raodster then I would go with the Mallett conversion in a heart beat. Having a custom built car that drives like a new car should is priceless.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
TerpFan said:
If you decide to take on this project you will need to do more than just bolt the new engine in. The new motor mounts will need to be placed in a new location requiring welding in. A new bell housing was manufactured by Mallett for his conversion. A cut and balance drive shaft will be required for the new drive line.

The hard parts that Mallett accomplished was balancing the car better than stock by removing pieces and relocating other pieces for fitment and proper operation. Even if you get through all this, you will need to create a new wiring harness and reprogram the stock computer to accept the new motor (intake, exhaust, timing, etc). The computer programming turn out to be the greatest expense of creating the conversion. For $18K you are getting one hell of an engineered conversion that would be hard for anyone to repeat.

I wish you the best of luck in taking on a project like this. Keep you eyes open to the forum over the next 2 months for news from Mallett Cars that could effect everyone considering a Mallett conversion.
I just prefer doing these projects myself as a hobby in the garage. If Mallet just sold the parts as a kit I would be all over it, not interested in the labor, thats the best part of do it yourself!
 

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bradyb said:
I would love a Mallett conversion kit myself but I don't think Mallett wants to be in the parts production business. They probably make thier money in the installation and tuning, not the parts.

Doing it yourself really only makes sense after you've used your Solstice and got your money's worth and paid it off. Buying a brand new car and tearing it apart is kind of stupid when you think about it. The Sol will be my commuter and then maybe 100,000 miles down the road I'll buy a wrecked C5/6 and get to work. There is always a Corvette rolling chassis to buy somewhere.

If I was in the market for a $50,000 Raodster then I would go with the Mallett conversion in a heart beat. Having a customer built car that drives like a new car should is priceless.
:agree: I'm with bradyb. I'll drive mine until the stock drivetrain is hurting, then look at "monster garage-ing" my own LS2 convo.
 

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SkyCaptain said:
With all due respect, TerpFan, engine swapping is a common practice. Yes, you have to know what you're doing. No, it doesn't cost anywhere near $18,000 to DIY. There is nothing magical that makes this platform any different from the other platforms getting motor swaps.
Most mechanics can do an engine swap, hell I did my own on an Integra. But to do it right with a better balanced product than the orignal takes engineering skills too.

LS2 Conversion on a Solstice:
Engine (Long block with intake) $5600
Engine accessories $1000
Corvette headers and Cats $1250
Cat-back Corsa Exhaust $1050
New engine mounts $200
Custom Bell housing $300
Cut and Balance drive shaft $350
Short throw shifter $150
New Clutch $650
Steel braided brake lines $250
Wiring harness $350
Reprogrammed ECU $2800 (Unless you can reprogram the stock computer to run an LS2 and keep all the original factory options working)

Total $13,950 (Parts only)

So yes, if you have the expertise than you could do it yourself and save over $4000. Figure in the manhours to engineer all this and do the work and you would be lucky to break even. In addition, Mallett is giving you a 2 year warranty on the work.

If you can do it cheaper and better then you need to start building these for the masses yourself :)
 

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Just to play devil's advocate, how much does Mallett get for the stock engine? Or how much does he charge the customer if the customer wants to keep all of his/her stock parts?
 

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I hope no one minds if I insert my 2 bits here.

Yes, I intend to do a LSx kit for the Solstice.

No, I don't plan to compete with Mallett. They have the cliental with the deep pockets that can write a check for just about anything they want. I don't.

For a little background, I've been doing V-8 swaps to Pontiac Fieros for more than 18 years now & have sold more than 2000 kits. For the last 16 years this has been a full time operation for me & at least 2 employees. (<~~ remember that, next time you rag on Fieros) We've also built some 250+ V-8 Fieros in house. While the Fiero gets beat up by people who don't know the car, it is actually a very good platform. Most small cars of the 80's were unitized chassis. The Fiero was a Space Frame style chassis. This means that none of the body panels were structural. All of the Fiero body panels could be removed and replaced with aftermarket body panels while still retaining a completely stock Fiero chassis with all of it's original windows, doors, interior, safety features etc.

The Kappa platform that the Solstice is built on is also self supporting & the body panels are non-structural.

When Pontiac announced what the platform & layout was going to be on the Solstice, I knew it was going to be the Kit Car platform of the future.

I intend to do an LS1 Solstice for myself & if I like it, I intend to develop a kit for it. I don't plan to copy the Mallett build, I don't like people who copy my stuff. Besides, I think it'll be several years before someone with a Mallett car allows someone to get close enough to learn anything from it.

I don't plan to compete with Mallett, but I will be around the Solstice many years after they have moved on. Mallett is an operation that has customers with deep pockets. Once their customers' demands moves beyond the Solstice, they will also move on.

As someone said earlier, anyone with a little talent will be able to get the engine into the Solstice. My plan is to offer a kit to those that want to do it themselves. Kind of a "Blue Collar" Solstice V-8 kit. Just like I've been around to service my V-8 Fiero customers for the last 18 years, I plan to offer that same kind of service to my V-8 Sol Kit customers.

Archie
 

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Archie said:
I hope no one minds if I insert my 2 bits here.

Yes, I intend to do a LSx kit for the Solstice.

No, I don't plan to compete with Mallett. They have the cliental with the deep pockets that can write a check for just about anything they want. I don't.

For a little background, I've been doing V-8 swaps to Pontiac Fieros for more than 18 years now & have sold more than 2000 kits. For the last 16 years this has been a full time operation for me & at least 2 employees. (<~~ remember that, next time you rag on Fieros) We've also built some 250+ V-8 Fieros in house. While the Fiero gets beat up by people who don't know the car, it is actually a very good platform. Most small cars of the 80's were unitized chassis. The Fiero was a Space Frame style chassis. This means that none of the body panels were structural. All of the Fiero body panels could be removed and replaced with aftermarket body panels while still retaining a completely stock Fiero chassis with all of it's original windows, doors, interior, safety features etc.

The Kappa platform that the Solstice is built on is also self supporting & the body panels are non-structural.

When Pontiac announced what the platform & layout was going to be on the Solstice, I knew it was going to be the Kit Car platform of the future.

I intend to do an LS1 Solstice for myself & if I like it, I intend to develop a kit for it. I don't plan to copy the Mallett build, I don't like people who copy my stuff. Besides, I think it'll be several years before someone with a Mallett car allows someone to get close enough to learn anything from it.

I don't plan to compete with Mallett, but I will be around the Solstice many years after they have moved on. Mallett is an operation that has customers with deep pockets. Once their customers' demands moves beyond the Solstice, they will also move on.

As someone said earlier, anyone with a little talent will be able to get the engine into the Solstice. My plan is to offer a kit to those that want to do it themselves. Kind of a "Blue Collar" Solstice V-8 kit. Just like I've been around to service my V-8 Fiero customers for the last 18 years, I plan to offer that same kind of service to my V-8 Sol Kit customers.

Archie

Here's to your continued success. I'll be in touch in a few years ;) :cheers:
 

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Would you considered or at least comment on installing the I6 Eng that GM offers that develops 275HP. on the Solstice?.
I know you all like V8's but I am looking for the smoothness of this Eng. and the idea that it was a I6 that came in the original 1953 Vette.
How much would you think it would cost to do this setup.?
Thanks in advance for your comments.
 
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