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More likely polycarbonate (higher impact resistance especially in cold weather) and that will take paint well. HDPE doesn't like paint, though flame-licking it to reduce surface tension can help.
When I made my recessed grill I used ABS for the recessed walls and had a hard time getting any kind of adhesive to bond the two types of plastic together. Somewhere on the forum you had posted about the flame licking technique and I tried it on the grill. It worked beautifully in allowing the two dissimilar plastics to bond using a two part 3M adhesive.
 

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Well, I found the complete opposite. I got a pair of N/A grills to cut down and install in my Norm's inset grills. Obvioulsy they are finished in silver so I tried to Easy-off the sliver 'paint' (not sure what it is) but Easy-off didn't touch it. So then I tried Krylon paint for plastic and it just was not robust and flaked off with the slightest rubbing. At this point I still have not finished them... I intend to take them to a friends sandblast booth, but just haven't had time.
Don't know why, but it could have been the paint. Just went out and found the can and it was RUSTOLEUM PAINT FOR PLASTICS. I just cleaned the grill (mine were silver too) with a scotchbrite pad and some alcohol, no primer, and the paint has held up well. It's been about two years and they still look good. As a footnote, I didn't use the original eggcrate portion of the grill material but bought a flat sheet of a similar design from CUSTOMCARGRILLES.
 

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I'd have to do a little checking, but I believe the EZ-Off is stripping the vacuum metalized "mirrored" finish on the headlight assemblies - that's a different process on an ABS substrate. I believe you were painting over a paint, so roughing up the surface would be critical to adhesion.

Most of the spray bombs of "for plastic" work by using just enough solvent to soften the material and reduce surface tension to get the paint to stick but flash off quickly enough to not induce chemical stress cracking in the plastic resin itself.
 

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When I made my recessed grill I used ABS for the recessed walls and had a hard time getting any kind of adhesive to bond the two types of plastic together. Somewhere on the forum you had posted about the flame licking technique and I tried it on the grill. It worked beautifully in allowing the two dissimilar plastics to bond using a two part 3M adhesive.
ABS will respond very well to a solvent adhesive. The "S" is "styrene" - so like a model car kit, the solvent softens the styrene, causing the two pieces to "mix" and when the solvent flashes off, the resin solidifies again.

Were you gluing to the fascia itself? I'm 99% certain that is RIM - Reaction Injection Molded - polyurethane. That stuff squirts in as a liquid and undergoes a chemical reaction turning it solid. Heat will not melt it again as the molecules have permanently cross-linked. That type of urethane is also pretty impervious to chemical attack so the solvent that would work on an ABS wouldn't have much of an impact on the urethane.

You might have had decent luck with the 2 part 3M (which I'll believe to have been an epoxy - they make a lot of improved versions for plastics now) without the flame treatment, but that treatment certainly would help.

When you think of surface tension of materials, think of a good wax job on your paint. That causes the water to bead up and roll off. Reducing that allows the material (adhesive) to lay down and cover all the small nooks and increase the surface area that it can bond to.
 

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When you remove them, be careful with the tabs as you remove them from the slots in the bumber cover. The tabs are "hooked" on the end and can pull the very thin inside edge of the slots loose. They will still function but its kind of a pain to deal with.
 

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I'd have to do a little checking, but I believe the EZ-Off is stripping the vacuum metalized "mirrored" finish on the headlight assemblies - that's a different process on an ABS substrate. I believe you were painting over a paint, so roughing up the surface would be critical to adhesion.
Yes, it's great for plastic chrome, but it also works on many paints. It's what I used for stripping my boomerang before re-painting: Ppssstt... wanna see an EasyOff'd boomerang?
 

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ABS will respond very well to a solvent adhesive. The "S" is "styrene" - so like a model car kit, the solvent softens the styrene, causing the two pieces to "mix" and when the solvent flashes off, the resin solidifies again.

Were you gluing to the fascia itself? I'm 99% certain that is RIM - Reaction Injection Molded - polyurethane. That stuff squirts in as a liquid and undergoes a chemical reaction turning it solid. Heat will not melt it again as the molecules have permanently cross-linked. That type of urethane is also pretty impervious to chemical attack so the solvent that would work on an ABS wouldn't have much of an impact on the urethane.

You might have had decent luck with the 2 part 3M (which I'll believe to have been an epoxy - they make a lot of improved versions for plastics now) without the flame treatment, but that treatment certainly would help.

When you think of surface tension of materials, think of a good wax job on your paint. That causes the water to bead up and roll off. Reducing that allows the material (adhesive) to lay down and cover all the small nooks and increase the surface area that it can bond to.
The (A) portion in the photo was the original fascia and the (B) portion is the ABS. The 3M epoxy adhesive bonded immediately with the ABS but required a large surface area which was sanded and flamed to get an acceptable adhesion to the fascia.
 

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Back when dinosaurs ruled the earth, my final year project at University was a "Statistical Check-weigh system" for Reckitt and Coleman (UK) - roughly equivalent to Johnson&Johnson/Kraft-Heinz here. When I was shown around the factory I saw the filled plastic bottles of some cleaner zoom by a vertical column of flame jets before getting their labels stuck on and my host explained why.

More recently I was using 'removable' peel/stick hooks to attach some picture frames to the side of a melamine foil-sided cabinet. Damn things kept falling off after a day. Third time I did it, I tried the flame trick first and the pictures have held up for several months so far :)
 

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I modified and reinstalled my grilles without the clips a couple of years ago. Have had no problems without them.
Great thanks. Mine are factory silver....want to paint them.
FYI I used black paint in a rattle can from Lowes that is made especially for plastics. It gave me a great finish that has held up extremely well. Can't remember the name of the paint but it is printed clearly on the can FOR PLASTICS. Those grilles are HDPE (I think) or some sort of high density plastic and painting them can be tricky. The Lowes paint worked well.
Excellent. Thanks.
 
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