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Discussion Starter #1
i have a very naive question. does the basic motor run on regular?
:cool:
fred from nashville
 

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Word has it that it runs best on premium.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ty for your nice reply. im wondering what the manual recommends. in the old days when there were carbs and no computers i would run almost everything on premium. now with the afore mentioned i only use what the manual recommends. hope its regular but i fear you may be correct.
fred from nashville :agree:
 

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mrfredsporty said:
ty for your nice reply. im wondering what the manual recommends. in the old days when there were carbs and no computers i would run almost everything on premium. now with the afore mentioned i only use what the manual recommends. hope its regular but i fear you may be correct.
fred from nashville :agree:
Manuel recommends 91 octane. BUT it will run on 87, with a minimal loss of power, I would suggest burning the 1st couple of tanks w/91. The ry a tank or 2 of 87. See the difference. The loss of power vs. savings may b what you want.
 

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Last week at the Mesa Ride and Drive, I spoke to one of the guys working the event. I was fortunate enought to spend some time with him on a drive during the lunch break. One of the tips he offered was to ensure I use premium gas, as you will notice a lack of performance without it.
 

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del_utz said:
Manuel recommends 91 octane.
Who the hell is Manuel? :) Sorry, couldn't resist.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks to all that replied. it sounds like i need to run 91 octane if and when my babe arrives.went thru the long wait when i ordered my prius a year and a hlf ago. the engine rerminds me of the type engine my 1st 240z had. it was a straight 6 single over head cam of 145 cu inches and 150 horses. back then you couldnt get a 4 cylinder to put out 177 hp and be reliable. also red line was 6500 rpm which back then in 71 was monstrous. :yesnod:
fredfrom nashville
 

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The car should run ok on 87, but it is not that much more economical to do so. Over the course of a year, the average driver would only save about $200 by using 87 instead of 91. That is not all that much, and only works out to be $2-$2.50 a tank. I bet I could save enough somewhere else every week to pay for the premium.

Also, the power loss could be significant since the engine has to retard timing for 87 grade to prevent knock. Potentially as much as 15% :eek:

Also of note, it takes the computer a few tank fulls to adjust. So if you run 87, you will have to fill up a few times with 91 before the computer fully restores timing and full power.
 

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Just a little food for thought. While the manual recommends 91, most gas stations don't sell 91. At least none in my part of the country. The standard break-out at gas stations in NJ is:

Regular - 87
Plus - 89
Premium -93

If gas stays as expensive as it is now, I plan to do the break-in period at 93 octane, then run a tank or two on the 89 octane mid-grade, and see if I notice a drop in performance. Then I'll decide from there. If the verdict is that the engine really needs premium, it will probably take more than a few tanks before the engine resets for the premium gas, but I don't think it will harm the engine.
 

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dengel said:
Just a little food for thought. While the manual recommends 91, most gas stations don't sell 91. At least none in my part of the country.
really? i thought 91 was a standard. i have never ceen higher than that in california. i have seen a station in arizona that sold 87 89 90 91 and 93. i thought that was weird.
 

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95% of gas stations in Indiana don't have 91 either (87, 89, 93)... but if you go to a cheap gas station (like GasAmerica) they have FIVE grades (85, 87, 88, 89, 91).
 

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dengel said:
Just a little food for thought. While the manual recommends 91, most gas stations don't sell 91. At least none in my part of the country.


How about 1/2 tank of 89 and the other 1/2 tank of 93 ? Wouldn't that give you 91 ? :lol:
 

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CableStooge said:
dengel said:
Just a little food for thought. While the manual recommends 91, most gas stations don't sell 91. At least none in my part of the country.


How about 1/2 tank of 89 and the other 1/2 tank of 93 ? Wouldn't that give you 91 ? :lol:
From what I've read, that's exactly what the gas stations do. They only have 2 tanks, one regular and one premium. By varying the percentages of each, they can have 3, 4 or 5 different octane levels.
 

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jimmyo said:
CableStooge said:
From what I've read, that's exactly what the gas stations do. They only have 2 tanks, one regular and one premium. By varying the percentages of each, they can have 3, 4 or 5 different octane levels.
You mean I can't buy 91 octane 'cuz the gas stations aren't mixing it that way? Those bastards! Maybe I will mix my own. :lol:
 

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Hi guys!!! Nice to meet you all...My name is Manuel and I'm a Solstoholic...

Chris said:
Who the hell is Manuel? :) Sorry, couldn't resist.
 

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CableStooge said:
dengel said:
Just a little food for thought. While the manual recommends 91, most gas stations don't sell 91. At least none in my part of the country.


How about 1/2 tank of 89 and the other 1/2 tank of 93 ? Wouldn't that give you 91 ? :lol:
If a Mysterious Solstice on 89 octane is traveling from Cleveland to Iowa City, Iowa on route 80 traveling at various speeds during break in period, stop turns around and fills up with 91 octane,returns at speeds on average, 15 miles per hour above the speed limit (now that the car is now broken in), only he passes Cleveland to see a friend in Erie, Pa.
How many gallons of which octane should he buy to get home? :willy:
 

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FYI - cheap gas

A couple of years ago one of my kids did a science fair experiment on different grades of gas (was it worth it to buy higher octane gas). Our local gas station (shell) carried 5 grades (86,87,89,91,93).

He ran equal amount of gas through a generator under moderate load and timed how long it would run. He started with the lowest grade gas.

Believe it or not, the generator ran shorter with each increase in octane - it also ran noticeably worse (harder to start). The damn thing barely ran at all on 93 octane. Thinking there was somehting wrong with the generator, I had him repeat the test - starting with the highest octane.

No doubt - the generator ran much better, and longer on 86 octane (+20% longer). :)

If our resident chemist runs across this thread, I'm sure he could explain why - but it is related to why you use higher octane fuel to combat knock.

Funny part is, I have 11 year old boat, that from the day I bought it (used) had been a bitch to get started. I had been putting in Premium gas - thinking it would run better. After my sons experiment - I switched to 87-octane. The boat has never started or run as good as it does now! :thumbs:

NOTE: This does not mean you should run cheap gas in your solstice :nono: but you're not doing your lawnmower any favors by buying Premium gas :lol:
 

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MAKsys said:
No doubt - the generator ran much better, and longer on 86 octane (+20% longer). :)

If our resident chemist runs across this thread, I'm sure he could explain why - but it is related to why you use higher octane fuel to combat knock.
I'm not the resident chemist, but I think I know the answer...

Octane is a measure of how easy the gas can combust. A lower octane "blows up" easier than higher octane. In a small gas-powered engine or generator, you want what will burn the easiest... but in a big 'ol car engine... you want precise, consistant high-compression combustion... and lower octane can compromise that by exploding too early and before correct compression is reached. Knocking is the early combustion.

Another note: cars that had lead in the gas used lead for two reasons. 1. Lead lubricated internal engine parts (valves, mostly) and 2. Lead increased the octane... a lot.

My father's 1963 Corvette convertible "fuelie" (L87 V-8 fuel injection 327 @ 360hp) requires at minimum, 103 octane.
 

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MAKsys said:
A couple of years ago one of my kids did a science fair experiment on different grades of gas (was it worth it to buy higher octane gas). Our local gas station (shell) carried 5 grades (86,87,89,91,93).

He ran equal amount of gas through a generator under moderate load and timed how long it would run. He started with the lowest grade gas.

Believe it or not, the generator ran shorter with each increase in octane - it also ran noticeably worse (harder to start). The damn thing barely ran at all on 93 octane. Thinking there was somehting wrong with the generator, I had him repeat the test - starting with the highest octane.

No doubt - the generator ran much better, and longer on 86 octane (+20% longer). :)

If our resident chemist runs across this thread, I'm sure he could explain why - but it is related to why you use higher octane fuel to combat knock.

Funny part is, I have 11 year old boat, that from the day I bought it (used) had been a bitch to get started. I had been putting in Premium gas - thinking it would run better. After my sons experiment - I switched to 87-octane. The boat has never started or run as good as it does now! :thumbs:

NOTE: This does not mean you should run cheap gas in your solstice :nono: but you're not doing your lawnmower any favors by buying Premium gas :lol:

That's because people have been fooled over the years to believe that higher octane is better gas. (The stations naming them regular, plus and premium most likely have something to do with that.)

The fact is that octane rating is merely the rating of gasoline that tells you how much the fuel can be compressed before it spontaneously ignites. More is most certainly NOT better, and it is actually worse for your car to run at a higher octane than it requires. (As your son witnessed firsthand in his experiment.)

The higher the compression ratio of an engine, the higher octane it will require. Ideally, you should use the lowest octane level that will not cause knocking. Anything more can slightly increase horsepower, but it will run the engine hotter and will result in more wear and tear on the engine. Being as how the manual in the Solstice states that it will run on 87 octane, the compression ratio is obviously tuned for 87, and you will see the best mpg using 87. I suspect that they recommend 91 solely for the purpose of squeezing a bit more horsepower out to list slightly better numbers on paper.

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