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Hello,
after getting a NOS passenger Airbag seat sensor i am able to pass the german safety inspection with the Car to it back to road.
In this context i will install my GMPP performance kit i bought 10 years ago.
Unfortunately it seams it misses some parts now ...

1. is someone selling a compete set?

2. is someone able to list all parts and post pictures so i can find out what’s missing in my kit?

Thank you
Joe
 

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and this thread talks about GMPP and soldering... -> GMPP and soldering

There are many people on the forum that say soldering, not crimping, is important ( I am one of those people ).
Yet there are others that say you should not solder. You decide for yourself...
 

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One thing that should be noted - GM never called the GMPP tune a "stage" anything, though many people perpetuate that name incorrectly.
 

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and this thread talks about GMPP and soldering... -> GMPP and soldering

There are many people on the forum that say soldering, not crimping, is important ( I am one of those people ).
Yet there are others that say you should not solder. You decide for yourself...
For what its worth, the warning against soldering stems from failures that can and have occured in wiring that is soldered improperly and then subjected to vibration. Crimping can be successful or not, just as soldering can be successful or not, for example all of the pins in all of the connectors that came in the car are crimped, and no wires anywhere in the car are soldered from the factory.

Basically, solder is brittle and can crack. If a wire is filled with solder then experiences flexing or vibration it can crack as well. the key to soldering successfully is to apply the solder only where the wires are twisted together, and not to allow it to wick into the straight single strand on either side of the splice. You also want to protect the splice from any strain.
 

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DO NOT SOLDER ANYTHING!

This is the MAP sensors, the proper O-Rings and the pigtail harnesses so you can just plug the sensors in without having to cut any of the wiring.


Those components in that link and also the CD that was supplied when you bought the GMPP kit is what you are going to need. You will have to bring the kit to a GM dealership and have them install it because they are the ones that will have to flash the ECM in the car. Having the kit from the link above will reduce the labor costs.

You are also going to have to press out the spacers in the bolt holes on the sensors. This is easy to do. Take the bolt out of one of the sensors that is already in the car. place the bew sensor bolt hole on top of a socket so the spacer can be pushed out. Place the bolt on top like you were going to put it in the hole. Take a hammer and hit the top of the bolt. this will push the spacer out. Make sure that the socket that you use is just a tad larger then the spacer. you want the sensor to be supported all the way around the spacer.
 

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no wires anywhere in the car are soldered from the factory.

Not true, All splices except for 1 in the Solstice are soldered and then double wall shrink tube that has adhesive in it is used to protect the splice. The one that isn't soldered is a "splice pack" where a bunch of wires needed to be joined together and this is a special kind of a clip.

The issue with soldering is that there is an almost unlimited number of grades of solder and also materials solder is made from, each one has different properties like resistance, melting temperature and the type of material it will adhere to. If the wrong solder is used (which can easily happen) the connection could fail completely, or the connection could degrade the signal running on the wire due to excess resistance.


The issue with using a crimp connector is that the crimp is done with the incorrect tool.

This is the incorrect tool
112078


correct crimping tool
112079



Pliers are not the correct tool either!!!

Because of the location of the connection being made double wall adhesive backed shrink tubing should be used over each connection. This makes a weather tight seal that cannot come undone unless it is intentionally cut open.
 

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NOTE: In order to ensure that the wires in the crimp hold up to the force used when crimping I strip the wire 2 times longer then it needs to be and then fold the wire over it's self before inserting it into the connector. Wire can get cut when the crimp is made, this makes the connection weaker and if there is movement in the harness the remaining wires can break. By doubling over the wire that is being inserted into the connector there is more "meat and potatoes" for the crimp to grab onto and it also limits how much of a crimp can be made. This is important because the crimping tool is not going to close up as much and the resistance on the handles of the crimper when squeezing happens much sooner so you hand is more open and it reduces the amount of force you are able to apply. That limit in force is what stops an "over crimp" from happening which is what cuts the wires.
 
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