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Discussion Starter #1
I'm close to pulling the trigger on a nicely restored and maintained MG BGT (I have a thing for coupes).

Help me out guys...would that be a good....investment?:lurk:
 

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Apple looks pretty good right now.
 

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You really are a shzt disturber aren't you? :devil:

Using the usual measure of investment potential in the car community, your MGB GT (a very usable classic, BTW) will make you money only if you buy at the right price, don't break anything, and the river don't rise (or rather car prices don't fall).

Generally, to make money, look to real estate or stocks not cars, unless you are happy consoling yourself with a nice driver. One of my favourite cars is the MGA coupe, the equivalent of that MGB, only earlier.

PS - you might consider the more powerful MGC GT if you can find one. Big straight 6 engine makes it a great touring car. Pic of the engine in our convertible (the added 3rd carb was my own modification).

 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
You really are a shzt disturber aren't you? :devil:

Using the usual measure of investment potential in the car community, your MGB GT (a very usable classic, BTW) will make you money only if you buy at the right price, don't break anything, and the river don't rise (or rather car prices don't fall).

Generally, to make money, look to real estate or stocks not cars, unless you are happy consoling yourself with a nice driver. One of my favourite cars is the MGA coupe, the equivalent of that MGB, only earlier.

PS - you might consider the more powerful MGC GT if you can find one. Big straight 6 engine makes it a great touring car. Pic of the engine in our convertible (the added 3rd carb was my own modification).

Good advice...but will it be worth more if I wear wing tips when I drive it?:willy:

But seriously, I've got a shot at a really, really nice one at a good price. I've owned one before as a daily driver believe it or not.

And no, I know it's no investment...:yesnod:

BTW, I've got a 'Lotus' friend who also owns two very nice MGC roadsters. They are very nice cars. He also owns 3 of the 5 factory Lotus Esprit X180R race cars (driven by Doc Bundy, Andy Pilgrim, Paul Newman, David Murray, etc.), an Evora, an Aston Martin, and Elise, a Caterham Super 7.
 

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I think that a really really nice one a a good price would be a reasonable purchase, as it should hold its value relatively well.

I would not buy one that needed restoration or a lot of mechanical work because you can easily put enough into one to exceed its value.
 

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That's right.

I know MGs very well and you are usually buying a restored one at somewhere between 50-80% of what the guy that restored it spent on it. It is possible to make money doing restorations, but you need to be both very careful and also lucky.

If you get a good one, they don't cost that much to keep in good shape - a car needs to be used at least a bit every year, or things like brakes and electrics tend to start showing issues. Regular use seems to keep them much happier. A couple of thousand miles in a summer will keep everything working well.

The MGB, especially the GT version, is a very usable classic, but if you turn it into a daily driver, then the resale value will fall fairly quickly to that of a 'user' car - but that may not matter to you if that's what you want.

I've jumped into my old MGs and driven a thousand miles without worry, as they are basic cars that are easy to maintain and to fix (including at the roadside if necessary - I've regapped points using a discarded matchbook found on the ground).
 

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My '63 B required some sort of hands-on attention pretty much every weekend to stay reliable. I didn't actually have to fix anything, it just seemed to want the attention. If I went too long without doing something; tune, adjust, wash even, it would break to force the issue. That is the only vehicle I have ever owned that I thought of as female.
 

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My '63 B required some sort of hands-on attention pretty much every weekend to stay reliable.
I think that if a car like this is really restored, i.e. everything is taken back to as new condition, whether that entails replacement or rebuilding of assemblies, then it is essentially as reliable as a new car.

The problem is that a lot of people throw some paint on, get it tuned up, and call it rebuilt, and of course it isn't and will be prone to various failures as old parts give up.

I rebuilt my MGC from a shell in the late 1980s. I rebuilt the engine, fabricated new exhaust and intake, replaced major items like the shocks, gas tank, fuel pumps, wiring harness and lighting, and kept only the things that were serviceable (original leather seats, instruments etc.)

It has done many thousands of miles without issue. The only problems I've ever had were a distributor shaft that unaccountably sheared (easily replaced with a modified MGB unit) and a front wheel bearing that overheated after we'd been doing about 4 hours of constant high speed (never mind how high, but it was on the way back from Lake Tahoe across largely deserted roads in northern California).

Otherwise, the thing sits there all winter (the battery stays hooked up as there is no parasitic draw from any electrical ancillaries - no radio) and fires up ever spring with no problem. Every year for the last 23 years, anyway.

Small things do always need fixing. The right angle speedometer drive has kacked on us twice and the clutch disc I used has a high ferrous content and will cement itself to the flywheel (most annoying) unless I stick a key in it, push the clutch in and spin it a turn or two every month or so. No big deal.

Leave it for longer than a few months though, and things would 'go to sleep' and there might be all manner of high resistance electrical joints etc., the gaskets in the carbs might dry out etc.

That's why any car, even a Solstice should be exercised at least a little. The ones that were put on jack stands and don't move for 30 years normally need a complete fuel and brake system rebuild before you can use them.
 

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I didn't intend to suggest that the B is an unreliable car, simply that mine seemed to get lonely if I didn't play with it. It never had a "major" failure and, as you said, pretty much everything on it could be fixed on the side of the road.

When I got mine it was 14 years old, and I had just graduated from high school. It spent four years under a tarp in someone's back yard, and was mechanically sound, but needed a lot of body work. It was never restored, only repaired.

I drove it all the way through college, and made several long trips in it. Including one to Chicago at Christmas, in a major snowstorm. That was the trip I replaced the electric fuel pump. On the side of the road. Downtown. In the snow.

Unfortunately it was hit by something a lot bigger than it was, and damaged beyond repair.
 

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I didn't intend to suggest that the B is an unreliable car, simply that mine seemed to get lonely if I didn't play with it. It never had a "major" failure and, as you said, pretty much everything on it could be fixed on the side of the road.
Yup, like wives and puppy dogs, MGs enjoy attention. ;)
I feel a bit guilty when I leave one of mine without using it for a year or more.
 

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Yup, like wives and puppy dogs, MGs enjoy attention. ;)
I feel a bit guilty when I leave one of mine without using it for a year or more.
My AH Sprite - MG Midget monstrosity always responded well to a little pat on the fender when getting ready to depart the drive in the morning. A few kind words would also do the trick.

Heaven forbid if you ever looked crossly at the car or said something nasty directed at the car. :brentil:
 

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I am more partial to the B' than the BGT. In fact, I was out looking for a B before I happened upon my Solstice. What I'm trying to say is I think the B model might be more easy to sell if the situation ever arises. On the other hand, if you can afford to buy the car and you feel the price and condition is correct, go pull the trigger. Once I turned fifty, I stopped questioning myself about things I wanted and could afford.
 

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Yup, ...like puppy dogs, MGs enjoy attention. ;)
Like puppy dogs, mine used to mark its territory with puddles of motor oil. Then... there's the Dark Force (Lucas electronics). Just the same, mine was an investment; I threw all kinds of time and money into it and if I didn't get it for free, it would have been a "horrible investment." As it turned out, it was just a "bad investment." Just the same, it kept me out of the pool hall and I had a blast driving it for many years until I "invested" money into a couple of Fieros and next week-end (crossing fingers) into a 2008 Sky Redline.
 
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