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I think that if they had been marketing a Kappa as a Chev (maybe instead of a Saturn) there is a decent chance that they'd have let the model see out it's planned life cycle. But that was what - only until 2011/12?
That makes sense, of course we will never know. My understanding was that the Kappa II was scheduled to replace Kapp in 2012.

GM did revive the second-gen Saturn Vue in 2011 as the Chevrolet Captiva, so it isn't unheard of to do a re-branding, there just has to be sufficient financial justification.
 

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I think one thing that would be against a rebranding of the Solstice as a Chev would be that Corvette has never wanted any other Chev sports car to exist. And once the mandated GM reduction was under way, I don't think there was any way they could have quickly switched the name ad get away with it - it would have to have been done earlier or from the beginning.

I wonder what the Kappa II would have been like....?
 

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I think one thing that would be against a rebranding of the Solstice as a Chev would be that Corvette has never wanted any other Chev sports car to exist. And once the mandated GM reduction was under way, I don't think there was any way they could have quickly switched the name ad get away with it - it would have to have been done earlier or from the beginning.

I wonder what the Kappa II would have been like....?
If the Kappas had been built using conventional tooling instead of hydroforming, had required less hand assembly, and sufficient profit could have been demonstrated, there would have been a decent possibility that they could have followed the Captiva path. At some point the bean counters would have overridden the resistance if the investment had already been made and income was available.

I think it would be easier to introduce a smaller, lower performance, front-engined sports car now that the Corvette has gone supercar mid-engine, but of course we will never know.

Kappa II was said to be based on the Zeta platform (G8 and Camaro) so it could and probably would have been at least somewhat larger, but with the same basic body lines.
 

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If the Kappas had been built using conventional tooling instead of hydroforming, had required less hand assembly, and sufficient profit could have been demonstrated, there would have been a decent possibility that they could have followed the Captiva path. At some point the bean counters would have overridden the resistance if the investment had already been made and income was available.
I have heard that GM was writing off the cost of the ENTIRE Wilmington plant against the Solstice/Sky/OpelGT production, which was only using a small portion of the plant's capacity. If this is/was the case. the Kappa would never have shown a profit. and was planned to fail before the first car was ever built.

:dunno:

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I think it would be easier to introduce a smaller, lower performance, front-engined sports car now that the Corvette has gone supercar mid-engine, but of course we will never know.
A sad but likely true statement. The two models might well have seemed so different that the Kappa or Kappa revised wouldn't have been viewed as significant competition.
 

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I have heard that GM was writing off the cost of the ENTIRE Wilmington plant against the Solstice/Sky/OpelGT production, which was only using a small portion of the plant's capacity. If this is/was the case. the Kappa would never have shown a profit. and was planned to fail before the first car was ever built.

:dunno:

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The Kappa was never really intended to make money. It was a halo model that was basically written off as advertising. Had it not been for the recession and bankruptcy there would not likely have been a concern.
 

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I have heard that GM was writing off the cost of the ENTIRE Wilmington plant against the Solstice/Sky/OpelGT production, which was only using a small portion of the plant's capacity. If this is/was the case. the Kappa would never have shown a profit. and was planned to fail before the first car was ever built.

:dunno:

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The development team was under orders to bring this car in at $20,000, which get pretty much did. Of course very few people bought them at that price because of the many options you had to pay for to get the car to a feature level most people are accustomed to. They met a target the was already calculated to be profitable, with the ROI coming in quickly because they didn't spend a lot of money on long-term investments in tooling, etc. That's where hydroforming and hand-fitting came in.

Now at the end, maybe they did assign the capitalize the plant on the back of the Solstice, after all it was a lame duck. What else were they producing in Wilmington?
 

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.....
Now at the end, maybe they did assign the capitalize the plant on the back of the Solstice, after all it was a lame duck. What else were they producing in Wilmington?
Wilmington Assembly was built in 1947, so it should have been fully depreciated before the Kappa was even thought of. All of the operating costs, taxes, etc would reasonably have been assigned to the Kappa, because that was the only reason the plant was still operating.
 

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in the long run, I don't really care what "they" say. I like mine, and I'm keeping it.
Well that is definitely the best way to be, but most people take criticism of the cars they own as if you said they were useless in bed or their dog was ugly and retaliate in kind.

They are often very surprised when they say something negative about one of my cars and I tell them that I agree completely and go on to list a few shortcomings they overlooked. We didn't design and manufacture the cars we own and all cars (that I have ever come across) are flawed mechanical contrivances. If all the good things about car exceed all the neutral and bad things, we consider owning one, but to become emotionally invested in your choice is plain foolish.

Everyone's equation is different, but if enjoyment > frustrating and/or costly aspects they are, to us, good cars.

Frankly, people who pretend that their cars are perfect and brook no criticism at all of them are fools.
 

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The Solstice is perhaps one of the most beautiful cars ever produced anywhere, and it did not present itself to be only a car the wealthy could afford. Those two things make it a winner by any standard. My black 08 constantly gets noticed even by people not into cars. Most have no idea what it is thinking it to be some kind of expensive exotic. Does it have faults? Of course, and I would not rate it mechanically as high as the two Miatas I have owned, nor does it handle as well. The designers, however, did fail in the car's interior design, something way too spartan and ugly for such a beautiful car.
I only use mine irregularly, though living in Puerto Rico presents year round opportunities. I doubt I will ever part with it, but I do fear the day when it will ultimately cost heavily to repair things that the entropy everything suffers will present.
Lables mean nothing really, but all of us are certainly a rare set of car enthusiasts that recognise absolute beauty in our cars.
 

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Yes, the people looking at the coupes are no doubt thinking "What a beautiful harmonious shape!"

Those looking at the convertibles may be thinking "Wonder what on Earth those humps are for?"

(Just kidding!)
 

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Those looking at the convertibles may be thinking "Wonder what on Earth those humps are for?"
"what a great place to push down on when I slam the trunk!"
 

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"what a great place to push down on when I slam the trunk!"
:p I had a friend who owned a Toyota Supra - the 90s twin turbo version (that I was able to stay about equal with in my homebrewed turbo Fiero) and would tell him that he had a great car hiding under a costume that looked like a jellybean with a handle (the Japanese have rarely been known for styling excellence, Toyota 2000 GT and Datsun 240Z aside).

I know convert owners love their humps and some of my vintage racing friends add them to their 1950s British race cars but they have never attracted me that much.

Never say never, though - if this was parked in my driveway I expect I could become a covert to the Quasimodo look.

 
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