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Sigh :grouphug: anyone else having trouble waiting for their solsti like us? We have a driving vacation planned to Skyline Drive for our red solsti, have the trunk space figured out, have the clothes figured out, and have the reservations. WE JUST NEED THE SOLSTI! :nopity:
 

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VTsolsti said:
Sigh :grouphug: anyone else having trouble waiting for their solsti like us? We have a driving vacation planned to Skyline Drive for our red solsti, have the trunk space figured out, have the clothes figured out, and have the reservations. WE JUST NEED THE SOLSTI! :nopity:
Yea, I'm with you. It has been difficult particularly because my wife just took ownership of a 2005 Bonneville GXP and one of my Councilman just took delivery of a BMW 325 Vert (both this week!).

Everyone else has their babies and I continue to wait and wait and wait and WAIT!

Hangin' in there but it sure is rough...... :cool:
 

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I was doing fine until production started this week.

Now, I'm getting really antsy about sitting in the driver's seat. I've never driven a manual or a roadster, so it's going to be one heck of an experience when I pick it up from the dealership.

:D :thumbs: :cool:
 

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blue_q said:
I was doing fine until production started this week.

Now, I'm getting really antsy about sitting in the driver's seat. I've never driven a manual or a roadster, so it's going to be one heck of an experience when I pick it up from the dealership.

:D :thumbs: :cool:
I would practice some on a manual or you're going to be stalling quite often!
 

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Adrenaline said:
I would practice some on a manual or you're going to be stalling quite often!
:agree: Could be an embarrasing beginning of your solstice ownership. You really don't want your first attempts to be in front of everyone watching at the dealership. Either find a friend willing to teach you on their car, buy a cheap beater for $300 just to learn, take a mini vacation to Mexico and rent a VW bug down there, or have someone drive it off for you, but don't try to figure it out in the dealer parking lot! You will be bitter.
 

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As each day passes the anxiety gets more intense just knowing the time is near. What is going to make it hard is getting the call from the dealer saying the car will be in in 2 weeks. That will be two weeks in slow motion. When April 15 was here I figured no problem waiting now I feel like a kid.
 

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blue_q said:
I was doing fine until production started this week.

Now, I'm getting really antsy about sitting in the driver's seat. I've never driven a manual or a roadster, so it's going to be one heck of an experience when I pick it up from the dealership.

:D :thumbs: :cool:
Ditto.
 

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SCSOLSTICE said:
My wife and I are retired We are planning a trip east to see the fall foilage in late Sept. early Oct. plan to drive Solstice.I hope it comes to pass. Well I am sure one of you young men will loan us your Solstice. If not our Envoy will have to make the trip. How depressing.
If you come through Ohio be sure to let the Ohio crowd know.
 

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Fortimir said:
When I bought a 70 Camaro back in 1975 I did not know how to drive a standard either. You would think my dad would have taught me but he just said you"ll learn and that was it. Didn't take long except for starting on a hill. So what I would like to say to you is "you"ll learn".
 

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SCSOLSTICE said:
My wife and I are retired We are planning a trip east to see the fall foilage in late Sept. early Oct. plan to drive Solstice.I hope it comes to pass. Well I am sure one of you young men will loan us your Solstice. If not our Envoy will have to make the trip. How depressing.
Take heart in knowing if you take the Envoy at least you'll be driving a car with Solstice back-up lights!!!
 

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My first car was a 1950 Studebaker with 3 on the tree. It had a unique feature called a hill holder. If you held the clutch in while stopped with your foot on the brake pedal, you could take your foot off the brake and the car would not roll. This let you put your foot on the gas before letting the clutch out. It helped a lot while learning. Sometimes older technology is still a good idea.
 

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The Mayor said:
Yea, I'm with you. It has been difficult particularly because my wife just took ownership of a 2005 Bonneville GXP and one of my Councilman just took delivery of a BMW 325 Vert (both this week!).

Everyone else has their babies and I continue to wait and wait and wait and WAIT!

Hangin' in there but it sure is rough...... :cool:

Congrats on the GXP Mayor. I love mine and it's a great touring/sport sedan. Maybe your better half will let you windup the Northstar, it's great fun.

AeroDave said:
:agree: Could be an embarrasing beginning of your solstice ownership. You really don't want your first attempts to be in front of everyone watching at the dealership. Either find a friend willing to teach you on their car, buy a cheap beater for $300 just to learn, take a mini vacation to Mexico and rent a VW bug down there, or have someone drive it off for you, but don't try to figure it out in the dealer parking lot! You will be bitter.
blue q

I learned to drive a stick as a kid by driving the 60s and 70s family Beetles. They're relatively easy to shift and forgiving. I think the best clutch lessons I ever learned myself were on an old Ford tripoint tractor my brother had me drive on his farm. left foot clutch, right foot brake, and throttle on the steering column. It was all about engaging the clutch properly to safely launch the tractor. Shifting was a vertical 6-speed (I think it was 6-speed)! That took some getting used too. Best advice from the last 30 years, get something without a tach (teaches you to listen to the engine and feel it too for judging rpms), that's got a long engage point on the clutch and practice, practice, practice before you pick up the car. Learn the feel of the drivetrain and how to shift smoothly and precisely before you worry about thrashing down the twistyturneys. You may find you spend most of left leg's clutch time in stop and go traffic. That's the least appealing job in driving a manual, but can be the best one to master for the sake of your car.

And oh yes, it seems harder to wait as delivery draws closer.
 

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I can't wait, and I'm sure my dealer can't either...they have got to be tired of me calling and dropping in to verify my status.

The only thing that worries me is that my dealer has 4 EOP cars...I am sure with my luck mine will be the last of the four to arrive even though I am the most anxious/excited (they tell me that none of the others call to check on their car).

Like others have posted, won't all this be funny to look at next year when it's just another car on the road? :cool:
 

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Wow. I certainly didn't expect everyone to respond to my "I've never driven a manual." Thanks for the tips.

I don't know how much of a lesson this is, but my brother's girlfriend's father has a mid-90's manual Civic that he said he would teach me on it. (That wording doesn't sound right, but I think it makes sense.)

Also, I found a web page one time, (I can't find it right now), but it said that the first thing to do when you get into a new manual vehicle is to put it in first gear, and with your right foot on the brake, slowly let out the clutch until the revs start going down. That's the point that you're going to have to start stepping on the accelerator in order for the engine to not stall.

I didn't get a chance to read much beyond that, but I figured that was one of the most important steps in learning a manual transmission. After that, you just have to memorize where the accelerator is supposed to be added in.

I thought it was interesting that I heard a car making a u-turn outside on my street the other night. He had the loud exhaust, so you could clearly make out the engine rev down and then back up as he was pulling out. It was almost as if he added the accelerator before releasing the clutch. It didn't sound like the right thing to do to me, but I thought, at least he knows how to get the car moving. I don't even know how to do that yet.

I'll learn on another car before I attempt to do it in my Solstice. I want to make sure I know exactly what to do when I pull out the parking lot onto the extremely busy Route 1.
 

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Busy highway = trouble for first timers!
Definately practice now so that you will be comfortable.
 

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blue_q said:
Wow. I certainly didn't expect everyone to respond to my "I've never driven a manual." Thanks for the tips.

I don't know how much of a lesson this is, but my brother's girlfriend's father has a mid-90's manual Civic that he said he would teach me on it. (That wording doesn't sound right, but I think it makes sense.)

Also, I found a web page one time, (I can't find it right now), but it said that the first thing to do when you get into a new manual vehicle is to put it in first gear, and with your right foot on the brake, slowly let out the clutch until the revs start going down. That's the point that you're going to have to start stepping on the accelerator in order for the engine to not stall.

I didn't get a chance to read much beyond that, but I figured that was one of the most important steps in learning a manual transmission. After that, you just have to memorize where the accelerator is supposed to be added in.

I thought it was interesting that I heard a car making a u-turn outside on my street the other night. He had the loud exhaust, so you could clearly make out the engine rev down and then back up as he was pulling out. It was almost as if he added the accelerator before releasing the clutch. It didn't sound like the right thing to do to me, but I thought, at least he knows how to get the car moving. I don't even know how to do that yet.

I'll learn on another car before I attempt to do it in my Solstice. I want to make sure I know exactly what to do when I pull out the parking lot onto the extremely busy Route 1.
Don't try to start learning in first gear. Try second or third. You need to stall the car right off the bat---just so you know what it feels like. Find an empty parking lot with a hill so you can practice starting out uphill without stalling. Get the feel for the slip and then let er rip.
 

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You're going to want to get used to the quick steering as well. It may seem twitchy at first. Again practice in an empty parking lot or country roads.

Better yet leave a meassage on the forum and you'll have 100 volunteers to "Help" o pick up your car.
 

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AeroDave said:
:agree: Could be an embarrasing beginning of your solstice ownership. You really don't want your first attempts to be in front of everyone watching at the dealership. Either find a friend willing to teach you on their car, buy a cheap beater for $300 just to learn, take a mini vacation to Mexico and rent a VW bug down there, or have someone drive it off for you, but don't try to figure it out in the dealer parking lot! You will be bitter.
Mexico is great..lots of dune buggies to drive in the bush...thats how I learned...just tell em you know how to drive them, and leave a nice tip when you are don :yesnod:

AreoDave...If you are in the first 1000 and don't mind, I'd love to see your SOl when y ou get it...I am having a ton of trouble waiting, and wouldn't mind going to Oakland just to see it. Well worth the 30 min drive!!!
 
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