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So I'm working on some custom parts for my Solstice and while painting some aftermarket stuff, I laid down way to much paint and now I have paint runs. So I know I will have to re sand the part and start over. My question is, what is the best process for doing this? Do I need to sand only the spots with the paint runs, or do I need to sand down those spots plus the entire piece again before repainting? Does anyone have a step by step process? Can someone tell me what sand paper grit I need to start with, numbers and all? Any help with this would be much appreciated:yesnod:.
 

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If you're going to re-paint anyway sand until you get a smooth surface. I'd start with like a 400 grit and work down to 1000 before the paint.
 

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If it a simple plastic or metal part, you can also use the old standby of Easy-Off oven cleaner (provided there's nothing else that can get damaged). Will dissolve the paint off easily - especially if freshly painted. Do it outside and hose off well afterward. Then dry thoroughly and start over.
 

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If it a simple plastic or metal part, you can also use the old standby of Easy-Off oven cleaner (provided there's nothing else that can get damaged). Will dissolve the paint off easily - especially if freshly painted. Do it outside and hose off well afterward. Then dry thoroughly and start over.
Neat trick, never heard of that one...:lol:
So you made my day TS, I learned something new today, now today will not be a wasted day..:thumbs::cool:
 

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You're most welcome ;)

Works even better for removing chrome off chromed plastic.

This is me removing the paint (and chrome) off my headlamp shrouds that had been painted by the PO of the spare headlights I bought for my HID conversion. These were painted some time ago and the paint was well baked and cured, so it took a few reapplications with oven cleaner. For fresh paint it'll take it off in one.

 

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I'm fixing a spot on my sons tail gate and had to re-do it several times. it all depends on the size of what you are painting and if the paint will blend in if you only paint the repaired area. if you are doing base coat and clear coat, you can get away with fixing the area. if it's a single stage then you are better off doing the whole thing. Id wetsand the run with some 220 but be careful, then follow up with 400 then 600 and then you should be OK. if you do get some over spray, a clay brick will take care of that once it fully cures. good luck.
 

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wow, I've never heard of using easy off for new paint. I'll have to try and remember that. I use easy off for all sorts of things. I used to spray it in the exhause pipe on my dirt bike each time I washed it or after a race. gets it nice and clean inside. I also used it as a degreaser and went thru about 5 cans on my Vette. I had some serious caked on stuff and it ate it right off. it will discolor aluminum and it's not good for your hoses but everything else, spray away my friends. it's good stuff.
 

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For a small run, after the paint has thoroughly hardened, you can use a razor blade 90 degrees to the surface and gently scrape many times lengthwise to the run.
 

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Easy on the paint this time...
 

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well, my wife has marveled as my ___ rigging skills and says I can fix anything. I've always been good at painting too. I've done engines, motorcycles, bikes, cars, thousands of things. guess after 40 years of painting stuff, it just comes natural. Hope it turns out good this time.
 
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