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I noticed last weekend when I was doing some highway pulls that my brakes suck. At least thats my diagnosis I did 3 runs up to about 120 mph and noticed a 'Wobble' feeling in the brake pedal. Seem to be overheating pretty quickly.

Whats the Cheap, quick, easy or best solution?

Better cooling would be an obvious solution but the problem might go deeper.

Thanks in advance
 

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How many miles are on your car? I think the best solution over stock breaks are a complete set of R-1 cross drilled and slotted rotors with Hawk pads or Red Stuff pads. That's what I like to use. I did mine for looks and performance early on before I even needed to change them out. The stock brakes suck in general.
 

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Of you are getting pulsing of the pedal, that can mean warped rotors. They can be turned to true them.

I talked with Doctor Dave about brakes. He told me that unless you track the car, the stock disks are fine. He recommended changing the pads would provide a huge improvement. It's in the works for our cars.
 

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Agree with Rob. Stock brakes are fine for the street, but you would seem to have either warped rotors, or material buildup from the pads. From your symptoms, I'd guess the latter. You can DIY this by taking the rotors off and use a disc sander to clean the surfaces (or just take them in and get them turned as Rob said).

DDM has a number of different pads sets (and rotors too) to swap yours out with. You really don't need to go with a full blown, or expensive, swap out though - unless you want the bling.
 

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You really don't need to go with a full blown, or expensive, swap out though - unless you want the bling.
X2

Get the rotors turned or replace them and use better pads (I like the Red Stuff I am currently using)
 

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If you give DDM Works a call, Dave will give you a recommendation based on how you drive the car. He has a lot of experience.:thumbs:
 

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Of you are getting pulsing of the pedal, that can mean warped rotors. They can be turned to true them.

Just a general information question about the rotors has anyone had them turned ? The last few GM cars that I did brakes on the rotors were throwaways the reason they told me was that replacements were cheap and they were making them thinner so that by the time you cut them they were no longer on the safe side.
 

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I have the same set up on my car R1 Concept rotors and Hawk ceramic pads as RedDevil and the big improvement to me is in wet stopping distance no issues one thing I would recommend would be the ceramic pads even if the rotors are not changed out these are all I use on all my cars anymore and I'm pleased with with them and I don't get all that brake dust on my wheels.
 

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Just a general information question about the rotors has anyone had them turned ? The last few GM cars that I did brakes on the rotors were throwaways the reason they told me was that replacements were cheap and they were making them thinner so that by the time you cut them they were no longer on the safe side.
You can turn them a couple of times without worry. You're only taking a few thou off and the rotors are not that thin.
 

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I agree with TS.

Rule of thumb is that factory rotors can be turned at least twice to recondition them. The turning process removes a very small amount of material. Similar to truing up a head.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e11G6hNRhqg

I also found this interesting
Tire Review - Brake Rotors: When To Resurface And When To Replace


Uneven Rotor Wear

Uneven wear is another problem that can ruin a rotor. As long as a rotor runs true and has minimal lateral (sideways) runout (less than .002 inches of wobble as it rotates), it should wear fairly evenly. But several things can cause a rotor to wear unevenly, resulting in thickness variations that produce an annoying pedal vibration when the brakes are applied.


Excessive runout in the rotor or hub can result from a stack up of manufacturing tolerances (or poor quality control). Runout can sometimes be reduced by reindexing the rotor position on the hub, or if that doesn’t work, by resurfacing the rotor on the vehicle with an on-car brake lathe or by installing thin tapered shims between the rotor and hub.


Rotor runout also can be corrected using a conventional bench lathe, but it requires a multi-step process. First, you have to measure and mark the point of maximum runout with the rotor on the vehicle. Then, you have to mount the rotor on the lathe arbor and attempt to duplicate the same amount of runout on the lathe. Then, you can cut the rotor true and remount it on the car in the same index position as before — and hopefully the runout will be gone.


Rotor distortion and runout also can be caused by overtightening or uneven tightening of the lug nuts. If somebody zips on the lug nuts with an impact wrench, the uneven loading of the lug nuts can twist and distort the hat section of the rotor, causing the disc part of the rotor to wobble as it rotates. Using a torque wrench to final tighten the lug nuts prevents this kind of distortion.


Dirt or rust between the rotor and hub also can create runout. Cleaning the face of the hub and the inside face of the rotor hat section with a drill-powered circular brush can eliminate this cause of runout.


Hard spots in a rotor casting also can cause uneven wear. The hard spots resist wear while the surrounding softer areas experience more wear. It only takes about .001 inches of thickness variation to cause a noticeable pedal vibration. Resurfacing doesn’t get rid of the problem because the hard spots usually extend far below the surface. Shaving off the high spots may allow the rotor to run true for awhile, but sooner or later uneven wear will cause the high spots to return. The only cure is to replace the rotor.

 

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One item that all of the above posts didn't include was "glazing". Brakes, when overheated can "glaze". Causing slick surfaces on the rotors and causing the brakes to feel like they are pulsing. We used to get this all the time at the dealership. Especially on cars that would be taken on a "hard" test drive and then sit for weeks on end. Glazing is when you get the brakes excessively hot and then park it without driving it to cool them. (Something that can easily happen in the Solstice) Do this....get your car up to 60-70mph and make sure nobody is behind you. Stand on the brakes and bring the car to a stop. Be careful not to loose control. ONLY do this once as more then that will overheat them and make it much worse. If you were doing pulls on the freeway (not what I would recommend), chances are you overheated your brakes and either warped the rotors, or glazed them. Probably warped them after 3 pulls......
 

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One item that all of the above posts didn't include was "glazing". Brakes, when overheated can "glaze". Causing slick surfaces on the rotors and causing the brakes to feel like they are pulsing. [...] If you were doing pulls on the freeway (not what I would recommend), chances are you overheated your brakes and either warped the rotors, or glazed them. Probably warped them after 3 pulls......
Er, Ahem...

Agree with Rob. Stock brakes are fine for the street, but you would seem to have either warped rotors, or material buildup from the pads. From your symptoms, I'd guess the latter. You can DIY this by taking the rotors off and use a disc sander to clean the surfaces (or just take them in and get them turned as Rob said).[...]
:devil:
 

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Er, Ahem...


:devil:
DOH!!!! :bow: Whoops. My boss was wondering around me all day today...he was interupting my forum time!! LOL.... How dare he when I'm at work?!?!?!? :willy:
 

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I just changed out my pads (Hawk HPS, $160) and had my rotors cut ($60) this past weekend. I found the instructions to bed the pads a bit conservative so after a number of 45 mph stops with hard braking, I'm happy with their performance.
 
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