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Has anyone dealt with those disturbing marks on the inside of the doors? It seems GM went real cheap with the interior vinyl. Does anyone have any recommendation in repairing those awful looking scratches? My interior is black. Thanks for all your suggestions.
 

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vinyl repair kit at local auto store and boat store had good luck with that product on a boss's boat.
 

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Do you actually mean the vinyl (soft) or the hard plastic areas? If the latter, there have been some posts on LIGHT use of a heat gun to reduce the visibility. Or use shoe polish or 'Back to Black' (or similar) products.

Nothing will get rid completely, unless you get them covered at an upholstery shop or JPM.
 

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I made the big mistake of using liquid shoe polish. It covered the scuff marks alright but left it shiny as hell! One year and it's still there and I can't get it off. I prefer the scuff marks to shiny lines! :(
 

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I'm going to assume you mean the hard plastic. (I work in the plastics industry and have done a lot of interior trim in the past.) It's not just GM that's gone cheap. In the late 90's all the car companies began to shift from ABS and PC/ABS alloys to polypropylene (PP) as a cost savings. I remember it well when my company was to start molding the grab handles and bezels for Chryler's minivan and was told it would be PP. I said "Are you kidding? These are going to look like dogsh!t the first time someone tries to use a wire hanger on them!" No matter. Cost is king.

Anyway, there's a product out there called perfix. It's a spray that is sold to molders to mask scratches and surface imperfections.

Plastic Flaw Repair Chem-Pak Perfix

I've not personally used it, but my process tech has and a few other people I've talked to have said it works well. I see on their web site that they have evaluation kits. If you get any grief about getting a kit to evaluate, let me know and I can order one through my employer and get it to you.

If you're concerned about which formula to get you can pop off the door panel and check the back of it. There should be a recycling symbol with initials inside of it. PP for polypropylene, ABS, PC (polycarbonate) PC/ABS for an alloy, PA is nylon (which I'll guarantee is NOT the case - too expensive for a door panel.)

Let me know if I can help.
 

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Anyway, there's a product out there called perfix. It's a spray that is sold to molders to mask scratches and surface imperfections.

Plastic Flaw Repair Chem-Pak Perfix

I've not personally used it, but my process tech has and a few other people I've talked to have said it works well. I see on their web site that they have evaluation kits. If you get any grief about getting a kit to evaluate, let me know and I can order one through my employer and get it to you.
Wow, this sounds great! Thanks for the link. I'd love to try this out myself - just a general respray of the whole interior :)

I did a google search but couldn't find anywhere an individual consumer (e.g. me!) to buy this. Any tips?
 

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You're right TS. Looks like direct sales or a single rep out there that sells it. Let me get a sample kit in. I should be able to dig up some black polypro parts around here, textured, to test it on. I'll take photos and post them.

My concern is that it really works well for molding defects such as flow lines and "knit" lines (where the plastic has to knit back together during molding on the other side of a hole in the panel or part.) It mentions "scuffs" but not scratches explicitly. I'm inclined to think if you carefully used a heat gun on a sharp edged scratch and then applied this, it may just work well.

Lemme see what I can do.

CW
 

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Wow, this sounds great! Thanks for the link. I'd love to try this out myself - just a general respray of the whole interior :)

I did a google search but couldn't find anywhere an individual consumer (e.g. me!) to buy this. Any tips?
Definitely ineterested in this!!! :thumbs:
 

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I called the factory in West Virginia. Their sales are primarily to manufacturers, so they didn't think I'd find a reseller.

At the factory in Martinsburg, West Virginia, (which is on the route from the northeast to Asheville, by the way) prices range from $10 to $14.50 per can in case lots. Minimums can be as high as 108 cans. There is a clear for and a standard black and also color matching. Maybe one of our supporting vendors would like to add a line if CW's tests work out well.
 

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Just received e-mail from the manufacturer. Evaluation kit is being sent today. Guess I'd better go dive into the archives to find some old sample parts to test! :thumbs:
 

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Oh, and I saw on their website that it goes for something like $138.00 for a case of 12 cans. $11.50 per can plus shipping both from the factory and from Chickenwire's Warehouse if that's the approach we need to take. ;)

Probably have to ship UPS - you can't send aerosol's through the U.S. mail can you?:huh:
 

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I'm sure it can't be shipped across the border, so I'd be looking at piggy backing an order to pick up at NASSM! (if it all checks out!)
 

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Just received e-mail from the manufacturer. Evaluation kit is being sent today. Guess I'd better go dive into the archives to find some old sample parts to test! :thumbs:

You are the man!!!

Thanks for taking a bullet for the team on this one and doing a test. :thumbs:
 

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:lol: GS - I'm not nuts! I'm doing this on molded parts we have in our plant. You think I'd just squirt this on my Sol? Then take pics of my utter despair if it didn't work? :cuss:
 

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I had a scratch/mar on my door pad that looked like it had been done by the seat belt. It was a whitish looking mark on the lower section. Can't be sure but it looks like the door pads are painted black after they are manufactured. Anyway, I went out and bought a can of SEM Color Coat flexible coating in Satin Black #15243 to try and hide the mark. I wiped the doorpad with varosol to remove any dressing I had put on the pad. The pad became very dull when wiped with the varasol. I taped it off and sprayed the scratch/mar lightly a couple of times to cover it then blended it out over the lower door pad from just above the door latch down to the speaker. It blended perfectly and the color is an exact match.
 

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g8 - when you say "door pad" can you be more explicit, or perhaps a picture? Most interior trim parts used to be of ABS, Polycarbonate, or ABS/PC alloy and painted because they were strong and held onto paint well. The move to get rid of the expense was both the plastic substrate cost and the paint. Polypropylene is cheaper and if you have the mold and the process correct, you could get relatively low gloss and a decent appearance.

Most of the plastics that were painted were molded in what was called a "90% match" color so if the paint was scratched off, it didn't look hideous. Your whitish mark may have been caused by what contacted it, OR it came from talc.

Yes, polypropylene commonly has talc added to it to increase it's stiffness and dimensional stability. The pressures used in molding bury the talc into the resin and leave the surface "neat" - that is without the filler exposed. Could be that the scratch simply exposed some of the talc filler, making it look a dull white.

I'm not familiar with varasol nor the paint you used, but I'm very interested. Propylene has a high surface tension and doesn't lend itself to holding onto paint - at least without some sort of treatment. The varasol sounds like it did the trick!

How long ago did you do this and has it held up? Sounds like a great solution.
 
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