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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys... I was under the Solstice today and noticed the rear (passenger side) yellow shock appeared to have fluid on the lower half of the housing, with some of it migrating onto the inside wheel and carport. I don't believe it's the rear brake leaking, as it looks to be solely on the shock. The fluid accumulated on the shock is dirty, so it may have started leaking a few weeks or so ago, but we rarely drive it (it's my wife's car) so it can't be sure how long it's been doing this. My question is is this an easy fix I can do myself? I much prefer doing repairs on my own whenever possible as I'm pretty particular on getting work done on my vehicles rather than anyone else. The car only has about 30k miles on it, so I'm a bit surprised, but I also know things can happen. The other shock looks fine...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
By 'matched set' I took it to mean two new ones, rather than simply replace one of the used ones and ignoring the potential wear on the remaining shock that's not leaking right now.

Anyway, I noticed Harbor Freight has a MacPherson strut (spring) compressor tool (two piece component) for about $15. Would I be able to use that to compress my two (rear) shock springs and facilitate the removal of the old shocks? Once I compress the spring, is it fairly straight forward to unbolt the shock itself and pull it, snaking it out and away from the A-arm support, then reverse procedure to put in new shock?

Any tips or tricks would be appreciated...

Thanks again,
Jim
 

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By 'matched set' I took it to mean two new ones, rather than simply replace one of the used ones and ignoring the potential wear on the remaining shock that's not leaking right now.

Anyway, I noticed Harbor Freight has a MacPherson strut (spring) compressor tool (two piece component) for about $15. Would I be able to use that to compress my two (rear) shock springs and facilitate the removal of the old shocks? Once I compress the spring, is it fairly straight forward to unbolt the shock itself and pull it, snaking it out and away from the A-arm support, then reverse procedure to put in new shock?

Any tips or tricks would be appreciated...

Thanks again,
Jim
Most (not all) folks sell them assembled with the spring. PM me!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So, after some limited research, and studying underneath the vehicle, it looks like I may be able to jack up the rear end, remove the tires, access the top shock nut and remove, push down on the rotor/hub to release the top of the shock itself, unbolt the base of the shock and then carefully snake it out. Then, reverse the procedure to replace with the new unit. Does that sound about right? It does't appear that I'll need to actually compress the spring to remove the shock, or am I underestimating the length of the shock and difficulty of that aspect of the removal/replacement?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I located a nice illustration on the Web showing the rear suspension in detail and it now appears I will in fact need to compress that spring coil to facilitate easier removal of the shock unit. I could rent the spring compressor from Autozone and easily accomplish that task myself. I assume at that point I could then unfasten the shock from the top first, compress the shock, then unbolt at the base. At that point the shock should easily be withdrawn and the new one replaced using this reverse procedure? Does that sould about right to you guys?
 
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