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I've had the good fortune to ride most of these areas on motorcycles.

I guess it is called 20 great American drives for a reason, and not called "the 20 greatest American drives. No Pacific Coast Highway in California. No "Going to the Sun Road" in Glacier National Park. No Kancamaugus in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. No Rt. 100 in Vermont. No Durango to Telluride, or Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado. No Beartooth Highway in Wyoming.

Then again, maybe they figure we all know about these roads and wanted to give us 20 great drives we may not know about. Works for me.

Funny, any road can be a great drive if you are in the right frame of mind. Strike that! Any curved road...
 

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Unfortunately I've never done the ones in FL they mentioned. Ones on the wrong coast, and I have no clue where the toher is. A1A is still a really nice road in some areas along the coast with a great Atlantic ocean view. I4 is also really nice at 7am on a Sunday.

Now the ones in Vermont I've done before though. VT is the best place to be in the summer.
 

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The description of #18, while interesting that the author decided to highlight gardens and nurseries, he only made passing references to some of the exciting roads and scenery. Mostly, he took the enjoyable and smooth 101.

At the risk of sounding obvious, there is a remarkable piece of road just made for roadsters, the Pacific Coast Highway. It's a narrow band of asphalt perched precariously on the cliff faces between the coastal mountains and the blue Pacific. In various incarnations, it stretches from the Mexican border to the Canadian border.

Joining other roads periodically, (including the 101 and the Golden State Fwy (I5) in California and other major roads in Oregon and Washington, it stays true to its coastal route for the vast majority of its length. The southern section from San Deigo to San Jaun Capistrano is mostly along the 5, but from San Juan Capistrano up to Santa Barbara, it winds its way along a bit away from the Interstate.

Further North, one of the most spectacular sections is the Central California coast and Big Sur with Monterey and and the setting of Stienbeck's Cannery Row a long days drive from LA. Along the way, the road crosses some remarkable bridges and naturally, crosses the Golden Gate from SF into Marin. Oregon and Washington have some truly spectacular bridges, some more than 4 miles in length.

Route 66 is also a classic drive, though I wouldn't recommend the dirt sections of the old road to something as pretty as a roadster. We've been all the way out past the mid point in Taxas almost to Oklahoma, and our leisurely 150 to 250 miles per day with a 3 day stop over at Grand Canyon's El Tovar Lodge over the Winter Solstice of 2003 filled our two weeks with beautiful scenery and a desire to go back again soon--WigWam motels and all.

I look forward to doing some of these drives again, even if it means getting an extra rear tonneau deck lid to bore holes in for the luggage rack.
 

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robrecht: I'm a jersey girl and I've never heard of the "sourland mountains". Where is this?
 

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OK, I agree w/ the Virginia stuff, but nothing compares to following the Blue Ridge Parkway into NC through Blowing Rock and into Cherokee. Twice as good as anything on the Virginia Side of the Blue Ridge I'd say. I definately agree with the extremely slow speed limit though. I ride my motorcycle there and the fines (federal instead of state or county based) are too high. I'd love to try out the Puerto Rico one some day. Sounds "exotic" compared to some of the others.
 

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solli4me said:
robrecht: I'm a jersey girl and I've never heard of the "sourland mountains". Where is this?
Most people wouldn't consider them real mountains, but I guess it's a fairly significant ridge line in Central Western New Jersey running from Lambertville to Hillsboro, and containing the largest area of intact mature forest in central New Jersey.

Here's a few links to get you started. Some great roads to get lost on in a roadster this time of year!

http://www.sourland.org/maps/maps.html
In addition to this map, this site has lots of other great information!

http://www.co.hunterdon.nj.us/depts/parks/guides/Sourland.htm

http://www.njskylands.com/odhikesourland.htm

Sourland Mountain Preserve
This state park consists of 273 acres of the Sourland Mountain range, a deciduous forest, and a swamp surrounded by two streams. The park was once used as a quarry, producing railroad ballast, concrete aggregate, and surfacing for roadbeds. What is particularly fascinating about the Sourland Mountains is the lore surrounding these hills. Some say the mountains are haunted, or that compasses will not work in this area. Also of interest is the Lindbergh estate, site of the famous kidnapping, which is adjacent to the park. Within the park, visitors can participate in biking, hiking, and in the wintertime, cross-country skiing. Hunting is also allowed in the park to control the deer population, however, a permit is required. Sourland Mountain Preserve is also an excellent place for birding, wildflower study, and reptile study. Free admission. The Sourland Mountain Preserve is open dawn to dusk every day, and is located on State Route 1020 in Lebanon

Good luck!
 
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