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Inside each door when opened, if you look down there is a chrome strip with
"Solstice" etched on it. Can anyone help me with the exact part identification and a potential source for the part? Also any recommendations on a stronger adhesive would be appreciated. Thanks in advance
 

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those are the door sills.

you can get plain ones that dont say solstice from source one auto parts.

you can get new ones from any GM dealer. crate engine depot is a favorite of many members here due to their support of the car and their competitive pricing.
 

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You may want to consider lighted door sills from windrestrictor.com. They are also a vendor and though not original it does add some bling. If you are replacing because they pop up it is a common problem that I understand is from the the metal strip expanding and contracting, and weakening the glue.
 

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In my '07 N/A these are black plastic. Was there a change along the way or were the chromes specific to GXP or model year?

I've eyeballed the windrestrictor illuminated ones...
 

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I wanted to have a spare for each sill when I picked up my coupe. I had to buy the whole plastic bottom of the sill that included the silver chrome strip, as GM Parts Direct said they didn't come separate.

They were listed as "Molding" (ewww...) and were around $35 each.

#25774447
#25774448

(One is RH, the other LH)

Hope this helps!
 

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The issue with the factory trim strip is that it is mounted to the plastic door sil trim in two locations near each end. When the metal trim part is subjected to long term exposure to low temperatures, it shrinks. The metal molecules actually draw together and this puts pressure inward on the glue points. They can actually allow the metal to move inward as it shrinks. The glue deforms. When the temperature goes back up, the metal expands. But it is now expanding outward with attachment points that have moved inward. Since the force outward is not sufficient to move the glue points first, the metal trim buckles up in the center.

You can actually fix the factory trim so it does not do this. If you apply a little heat, you can pry up the factory metal trim pieces, then clean off the factory glue and apply a strip of 3M tape in the center of the metal trim. If you hold it down in the center it can expand and contract without buckling up in the middle.

I went to the WindRestrictor lighted door sills on Punisher and repaired the factory sills on the Green Dragon. Either works well.

If you tend to drag your feed across the sills when entering and exiting your car, and are going with the after market sills, consider putting some 3M clear bra material on them. They are stainless steel and hold up very well, but they are so pretty that you do not want to get them scratched up.

I ran my door sills for over a year without wiring them up and they looked great. You can buy them in a lot of different colors and put the custom graphic of your choice on them.
 

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If you tend to drag your feed across the sills when entering and exiting your car, and are going with the after market sills, consider putting some 3M clear bra material on them. They are stainless steel and hold up very well, but they are so pretty that you do not want to get them scratched up.
^^ This ^^ I wish I'd done this with mine. Now mine are scratched up a bit. :(
 

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^^ This ^^ I wish I'd done this with mine. Now mine are scratched up a bit. :(
Mine have minor surface scratching. It is not really noticable yet. . . of course people tend not to notice a lot of little imperfections on Punisher because its pretty much IN YOUR FACE everywhere else :party:

But when / if it does begin to bug me I have two approaches in mind. First is to use some steel whool to treat the surface and create a new set of uniform patterns in the metal. Second is to get them painted gloss black to match the interior of the car. In either case putting on some clear bra is in order.

I want to make it clear that I did not scratch them. It was all done by other namless knaves. :willy::thumbs::grouphug:

For you linguistic anthropoligists (and I know you are out there ready to pounce):
(nave (n v) n. 1. An unprincipled, crafty fellow. 2. a. A male servant. b. A man of humble birth)
 

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I come from a long line of knaves and landless serfs.
 

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The issue with the factory trim strip is that it is mounted to the plastic door sil trim in two locations near each end. When the metal trim part is subjected to long term exposure to low temperatures, it shrinks. The metal molecules actually draw together and this puts pressure inward on the glue points. They can actually allow the metal to move inward as it shrinks. The glue deforms. When the temperature goes back up, the metal expands. But it is now expanding outward with attachment points that have moved inward. Since the force outward is not sufficient to move the glue points first, the metal trim buckles up in the center.

You can actually fix the factory trim so it does not do this. If you apply a little heat, you can pry up the factory metal trim pieces, then clean off the factory glue and apply a strip of 3M tape in the center of the metal trim. If you hold it down in the center it can expand and contract without buckling up in the middle...
That is not entirely accurate although the result is the same. The plastic is what's shrinking and not he metal. If you look at the sill, the metal insert sits in a recess in the plastic sill plate. As the temperature decreases, the plastic shrinks more than the metal and because of that the metal has no place to go but buckle up in the middle.

You can prove it by putting the plastic sill in the freezer. I found that the plastic sill shrunk a full 1/2" from room temperature to below freezing in a couple of hours. That's why your metal sill inserts buckle.
 

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Good point.

I have not done the fix but the problem is hard points and differential coeficients of expansion between the substrate material and the metal material. If you allow for the differential expansion and contraction then you solve that particular problem.

Good to know that you have experiemental data to support our hypothasis.;)

This seems appropriate
:chill::chill::chill:
 

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As sly pointed out - the plastic has a CLTE (coefficient of linear thermal expansion) that is 5 to 10 times higher than metal. (I deal with this crap a LOT in my work life - aka -non-kappa life.) For every degree of temperature change the plastic will typically move at least 5 times farther than the steel (or more.)

If you plates haven't permanently deformed, or if you can get them back to shape and want to save them, I'd recommend a tape that 3M came up with they refer to as VHB (very high bond) which is a pressure sensitive tape, but it comes with differing thicknesses of "foam" in between the top and bottom. This could let things grow and shrink according to the temperature changes and still maintain adhesion.
 

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Oh, and I understand "knaves", I just struggled with "namless".

(pokes at the new moderator like a fool.)

:jester:
 

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Oh, and I understand "knaves", I just struggled with "namless".

(pokes at the new moderator like a fool.)

:jester:
Well, you got me there. The knaves shall be not named...and shamed.
 
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