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Discussion Starter #1
The pictures with the body panels removed shows something unusual at the front end. The upper half of the front grill is just for looks. This seems to be confirmed in the "AutoWeek" picture that shows the car with no egg crate insert. All the air for the intake and radiator enter the engine bay from below a large flat shelf that extents back from the crash bar.

This shelf looks like the perfect place to Velcro mount a small tool box on one side and, on the other side, a box to hold a quart or two of oil I know I'll need when the miles have accumulated. Yes it would be under the hood, but, because it's in front of the engine, if properly weather sealed, that shouldn't be a problem.

Of course, the actual production car may have something there already.

I'm already looking at ways to get around that tiny trunk. I would be a great marketing hook for the General, ala the custom luggage from some Italian dream cars. If not from the factory, I'm sure it would sell well on the aftermarket.
 

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:rant but with that your missing the point of the car....this is a roadster not a minivan or a suv or a mid size sedan. a roadster is supposed to be fun light weight and somewhat fast...there supposed to be bare boned cars with nothing but and engine 4 wheels and a steering wheel. to quote "this is a back to basics roadster" from bob luntz(spelling) :rant but I can see your point with that toolbox but to me its just not needed in a roadster.
 

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Too true! :agree I'm having to convence myself that 500# more than the car I'm currently driving and only an inch or two narrower than a Corvette isn't a bad thing. I'm not talking about a roll around Snap-on.

But I guess I'm too "old school". I'd rather carry a tool kit than a cell phone. Drive it too hard, too long and things break. The ultimate roadster, a mid 50's Spyder, ala James Dean, came from the factory with a socket set, Allen wrenches, screw driver and plyers in a little little tool wrap that fit under the seat. All stamped with the Porsche logo. Very cool! :thumbs

Oh, and I forgot to mention a place to carry a factory service manual (won't leave home with out it). :leaving
 

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see though with all the new technology that is going into these cars you just cant simply "fix" it with some wrenches, screw drivers and some sockets. I know I am young and all, but with modern day engines and cars I would simply use my cell for a tow....now me personally I love cars with a passion and i know how they work and all that good stuff but when it comes to puting it together or fixing it.....im NOT your man....this of course is all IMHO! :cheers

but you cant beat the fact that this car looks sooooo F'in good and is afordable to even a student like me!! :leaving :cool :lol :thumbs :jester :cheers
 

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I have two toolboxes that fit in the bottom of the rear trunk in my Fiero. One for wrenches and such, the other for electronics. Reatta is even worse. Looks like there would be room for two across the front of the Solstice. Might get a bit warm there for luggage though.

GM grilles are mostly for styling these days, almost everything is a "bottom breather". Idea is that the same air dam that diverts airflow through the radiator also keeps a high pressure area from forming under the engine compartment.
 

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I understand the desire to have a tool kit with you. Having driven many vintage cars for years I have actualy found a tool kit useful and more than once got myself back on the road. However that was with old cars. All the cars I have bought new I have also carried tool kits and a quart of oil out of habbit, and I have to admit I have never needed them. Not even the spare tire.

What Atomicracer83 said is also very valid, it is increasingly difficult to do much about the kind of failure that would leave you stranded with just pliers, wrenches, screwdrivers, ect. New engines generaly don't use any oil for at least the first 80k miles and after that only 1/2 to 1 quart every 5k miles. If you're low, just go and buy one. Tool kits are just an old habbit us geezers have to get over. However if the Solstice were bigger I would probably through a kit in.... old habbits die hard. :rolleyes
 

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As one who tends to keep things far past their sell-by date (the only car I have at the moment with less than 100k is a 1988). I find having a reasonable assortment along very useful, particulaly if I come across a new "recycling center" (a 10 mm box and a 7 mm 1/4 drive are all that is necessary to remove a type II Delco ignition - I prefer them to Magnavoxes).

That said almost all my cars (GM) are now metric so the $9.95 combo toolkits (do not mind losing bits from them) are almost 1/2 useless (19 mm and 3/4" are the same). Take the serpentine belt on a 3800. To relieve the idler you need a two foot 18 mm wrench with an offset box and they do not grow on trees. Alternators can be removed with a 13 mm wrench and a pair of pliers once the belt is off and more than once have needed to replace an alternator on a trip.

Yes I could pull into a dealer but once the warrenty is over, such visits require multiple franklins & when replacing an ignition, alternator, or starter is a 20 minute job with normal hand tools and without a jack why should I pay for someone else's OJT ?

And the most telling reason: anything you have with you will not be needed. Cheap insurance.

You might gather most of my failures involve electrics. You would be right.
 
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