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After finding about 1/4 teaspoon of oil in the intake pipe just in front of the turbo charger when I installed a CAI, I have decided to add OCC’s to both the intake and turbo crank case vapour breather lines. I have read an endless amount of posts, utube, internet etc and decided on 2 small cans with brass micro filters and baffles. These were identical to the Mishimoto but 1/4 the price.

After you remove the intake line out of the way (#1), use two wedges, I used flat head screwdrivers, and evenly force them down to pry off the turbo line (#2), Doing it this way you don’t have to remove the end connected on the turbo.

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After the fitting is removed, cut the end off leaving the 90 degree bend to connect the 3/8 line too. I used a hand cutter for 1/2 inch copper line but if you place something in the line that can hold back filings you could cut it many ways.

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attach the 3/8 line to both fittings and route them to your OCC. I chose to mount the turbo line OCC above the battery and attached to the fuse box. With my OCC I was able to dremmel a small slot and hang the can. I used 3/4 inch heat guard near the turbo.

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finished install pictures in next post
 

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Discussion Starter #2
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this took less than 3 hours to install and under $100. I will install the second can tomorrow
 

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it looks good.

Having the low spot in the line shouldn't be a concern either. when the recirculating valve does it's thing and blows the boost pressure back into the intake some of that pressure is going to go up the line backwards and thorough the catch can. it should push anything that may settle in that dip in the line under the fuse box right back into the valve cover.


FYI the end of the line that is attached at the turbo comes off really easily. there is a 10mm bolt holding it in place. You can use a piece of wire and a flat head screw driver to get the line off of the piece that inserts into the turbo. there is more room on that end of the line and you wouldn't have to pry the line off like you did the valve cover.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hopefully the OCC is working properly and there shouldn’t be any oil to blow back. The fitting pried off easily with little fuss and l wanted to use the rigidly of the existing line with the 90 for getting around the turbo. Worked really well.
 

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It looks good. the line sags down between the valve cover and the catch can yes?? if it does then there will be ponding in that line. but due too the amount of pressure that is going to blow backwards from the turbo to the valve cover when the recirc valve opens anything that has ponded in that line will get pushed backwards and back into the valve cover.

When you install the catch can on the other line you do not want the line at any point to be lower then the connection on the valve cover and lower then where it connects at the catch can. you can have it higher in the middle of the line. just not lower..


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The next line you do it is extremely important that the valve cover too catch can connection is not lower then where it connects at either end. The pressure blow back from the turbo may not be enough to clear the line if it gets filled with oil. this is one of the reasons why the check valve gets gummed up, when the pressure does blow back some oil does manage to get into the line. the line is angled downhill to the intake pipe so it rolls down and sits against the back of the check valve. when the car goes back under boost the flow of air changes in the proper direction. the check valve opens up but the flow of air is simply not enough to push the oil backwards up the line. so the oil on the bottom of the line and the air passes above it.. the oil flows down hill and ends up getting into the intake pipe.. the oil eventually gums up the check valve and it doesn't close all the way so the problem gets worse.
 

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If there is a dip in the line as seen on the last post the lines will have oil in if the line is the one that goes from catch can to valve cover. as the hot vapor passes through the line the vapor will cool and condense on the inside walls of the line. when enough vapor has condensed for it to form a droplet that droplet is going to follow the only 2 things a liquid knows how to do.. go downhill as fast as possible. once at the bottom it will sit there over time more and more of the droplets will do the same thing eventually filling the line completely. If the pressure that moves the vapor up the line is not high enough or the vacuum on the opposite side of the filled line is not low enough then the vapor will not be able to get past.

What actually is made is what is called a manometer when that happens. do a google search for "Manometer".
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks kgs. I agree 100% and will look at a reroute. Should be pretty easy to run the lines without a low point
 

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Nice work @Rdesh !
It will take some monitoring and adjustments. My OCC is located towards the headlight section area and is lower than the valve cover and the turbo inlet. When engine cools down, any droplets should gravitationally flow back to the can.
 

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I would love to be working on my Solstice, Instead it is all covered up sitting outside in the cold... 😢. Now I have the lucky job of replacing the PTO (Transfer Case) on my Lincoln MKS. it' gonna be a cold job and I really don't wanna do it.

It says it is a 5.6 hour job... I wonder how fast I can get it done it. I know that I can skip taking apart the suspension to get the axle out. i can take the wheel bearing out and that gives enough room to move the axle outwards, then turn the steering wheel and that will be give enough room to get the spline out of the transfer case. If it was warm out I could probably get it done in 1.5 hours. so maybe 3 because it's cold... BLAH!!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It warmed up to -5 here yesterday so I thought I’d uncover it bring it in the garage and start working on it. Funny though I run a 2009 MKX, been an amazing vehicle only thing that ever went on it was the fan module
 

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I did not like the oil in the intake either. I removed the intake manifold. And the head. And the block. And the transmission the cooling, the charging system, the driveline, motor mounts and much of the wiring. Solved the problem. No more oil in the intake. :)
 

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I still haven't started the transfer case.. I will tomorrow.

My MKS has 180K miles on it. I did have an injector go bad, and an O2 sensor go bad. I had a bad control arm bushing so I replace the entire suspension on the car. every moving component except for 2, I couldn't find them for sale anywhere. they were nationally back ordered and no aftermarket companies made them either. That was 2 years ago, I just replaced those 2 parts as well because the went bad. I fixed the typical rear camber problem that seems to have plagues Fords since 2000 (trucks don't have the problem). I had a company make a set of bolts for the upper control arm ball joints that have a lobe on them. this gave me an additional degree of movement. Now there are companies that actually make the bolts. That worked for a few years until the springs in the rear sagged enough to throw it off far enough where it can't be adjusted out. So I put air bags in the back. Back to being perfect.

The brakes for the car were to small for mountain living, a 5000 lb GVW vehicle that has 12" diameter front brakes and 11" diameter rear ones is not going to be the easiest thing to stop. Plus there was a design issue with the caliper slide bolts where the bushing the pins rode in would allow the caliper to angle it's self. so the caliper side pad would end up tilting and only riding on the edge closest to the hub.

on the 4th time of replacing 4 calipers, 4 rotors, and all of the pads I had enough.. So I took the front rotors off of a 2014 police interceptor the rear rotors from a 2016 police interceptor and the front calipers from a 2012 Taurus SHO and I don't remember what I got the rear calipers from, But the front brakes are 1.5" in diameter larger, the pad to rotor contact is is more then double, the front rotors are thicker and have vented hats, the rear brake rotors are 1" larger in diameter, are vented instead of solid and have close to double the pad to rotor contact. Everything bolted right in brake lines connected without issue, The only thing I had to do was take the dust shield off flatten out the edge and bend it again so the larger rotor wouldn't hit it, couple of coats of primer and some black paint... Good to go.

Again the only things that went bad are the rear toe links, O2 sensor, control arm bushing and fuel injector. Technically the brakes are considered a maintenance item, and replacing the entire suspension was by choice. So having the transfer case develop an issue after 180,000 miles.. when it is a sealed unit meaning no fluid changes.. I'm OK with that... If your MKX is an AWD put aside 2,000 - 2,500 bucks because the transfer case will fail. It is a known issue with Ford/Lincoln and it can happen any time, people have had them fail at 30,000 miles. If you ever have a chattering in what you would think is the transmission when going up a hill RPM's greater then 4000 and the car shifts up a gear. This is caused by the clutches in the transfer case slipping. once that happens usually a tiny drip of some fowl smelling brown lubrication will take place under the car, it can be accompanied by what people have reported as smelling propane. The drip is not oil and not ATF, it's used in a single spot in the transfer case and is the tell tale sign it's time to get it replaced. If your car sounds like you are rolling a tin coffee can that is 1/2 filled with nails down the street, first off that's bad.. it is the transfer case that has completely failed.
 

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Oh I did have the HID bulbs go bad as well. the sunroof motor did to , but the motor could be considered my fault because I live in Evergreen, CO and guess what we have lots of. actually almost exclusively.. Evergreen trees. pine needles clogged the drain tubes and water back up and overflowed onto the motor and control board for the motor. I should have cleaned the tubes once a year but never thought about it, so i didn't do it. LOL

I bought the car used with 60K on it for 16,000 some 7 years ago, a couple more months it will be paid in full (yeah yeah 7 year note, dirt low interest at 1.9% so why not?). So I really can't complain. It has never left me stranded, and it has always started when I press the button. In a few months I will be buying another Lincoln, a small SUV like the MKX, I will use the MKS as my "winter beater"
 

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I will count myself as lucky I guess, 150,000 km on the MKX and agree on the weak brakes. It is AWD so not looking forward to a transfer case issue but no symptoms so far. Changed the rear wheel bearings as was noting some road noise and regularly grease the large panoramic sun roof to save the motor. I started towing it with the motor home a few years ago and tows great. Used the Air Force One kit that uses regulated air from the MH and meters it to vacuum on the car and uses the vacuum to push a small ram on the brake pedal. Great system if your ever in the market. A descent 3 day project.

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so you have under 100K miles on it. so you should be good to go for a while. Just an FYI in about 30,000 mi (50,000km) You will have to start replacing some of the bushings on the suspension. Your car is 12 years old and the rubber has started to dry rot. The first thunk I get on any vehicle suspension is when I replace the entire suspension. the new part is going to be a lot stiffer and it will put added stress on any old parts still left in there causing them to fail much faster. Sp I didn't want too have to tear everything apart again 2 months down the road for another failed part. There is a company called Mevotech that made almost all of the parts for my car,m I am sure they also make the parts for the MKX as well. This is what I replaced

  • front
    • lower control arms (came with the 2 bushings)
    • lower ball joint
    • inner rack ends
    • outer Rack ends
    • sway bar bushings
    • sway bar end links
    • wheel bearings
    • strut mounts
    • spring insulators
    • struts
    • axles with CV's
  • rear:
    • lower control arms (came with bushing too frame)
    • lower control arm to knuckle bushing
    • lateral link (came with bushing to frame)
    • lateral link to control arm bushing
    • trailing arm (came with bushing to frame)
    • trailing arm to knuckle bushing
    • upper control arm (came with bushing to frame)
    • upper control arm bushing/ball joint to knuckle
    • shocks
    • sway bar bushings
    • sway bar end links
    • wheel bearings
    • spring insulators
    • axles with CV's


I am sure there are probably some things I didn't add to the list. the cost was about 1400.00 USD for all of the parts. I did did everything at one time, it took me about 7 hours to do. and that was with an hour and a half of the time being used cutting 2 bolts out that had been put in backwards. couldn't get the bolts out unless I pulled the rear sub frame with the diff. Ford assembles the suspension to the sub frame when the sub frame is not in the car, then lifts it in as a single unit. The bolt would hit the body of the car when trying to take it out. Cutting a grade 10.8 hardened steel bolt without a torch and it wanting to spin while doing it is a wee bit of a challenge.

I am willing too bet if I do some looking I can find a bolt in big brake setup for your MKX that would cost the same as the OE brakes. your MKX might even have the same brake system that my MKS has. If that is the case I can tell you where to get the parts from. the total cost to do the brake upgrade was 1200. I cannot even begin to say how much of a difference it is driving the car now. I always used to have this low frequency sound that kinds sounded like the brakes grinding (but they weren't) and after the conversion they are nice and quiet.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Just did the brakes last fall and live in the prairies now but thanks l will keep that in mind
 

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As usual I do things twice. After thinking about it more, and yes listening to your input, I installed both OCC’s between the right head light and hood hinge. It keeps all the lines running downhill and looks tight and not as cheap. I had a chance to use my $30 camera and through the brake vacuum got a picture. Not great but can definitely see the buildup on the valve. Hopefully the OCC’s do the trick

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That looks way better then the location you had it at before. I tip my hat to you for a superb job.


If you want to fix the small notch you took out of the fuse box cover it can be done without to much headache.

You will need a Dremil tool to do this. Look at the cover and it should tell you somewhere on it what type of plastic it is made from. It's probably ABS. do a search for "ABS 1/8" rod" or if you buy from Amazon do it in their search. You should be able to locate it. Make sure it is round rod and not some other shape.

cut the rod into several 2 - 3 inch (51-76mm) long pieces long pieces. take one of the pieces and put it into the end of the Dremill tool as far as it will go in and tighten up the chuck on it by hand.. no need to use the wrench.

Turn the Dremil tool onto it's lowest speed. If the rod bends over and flails about like a whip throw that piece away and cut them 1/4" (6mm) shorter and try it again. Once you have it so it doesn't do that you are good to go. You might want to practice on a scrap piece of plastic. take the top of the spinning rod and hold it again a piece of scrap wood until it starts to melt. The move over to the plastic piece and touch the rod to the plastic and hold it in place until it starts to melt then slowly move across the edge of it. once to the other side stop and wait a minute. then repeat the same process and make another pass. You are going to have to feed the rod out as you go. you can use up all but a really tiny piece that is inserted into the Dremil. What I do is I will use my fingers and squish the plastic and smooth it while it is still hot. it makes it easier to clean up and make look good when you are done filling.

This is how you fix cracked panels in a car. You do this from the back side and you "weld" the pieces together using friction. You can also use this to fill holes in plastic, and also fix cracked bumper covers. when you get good at it you can repair a crack in a bumper cover and you would never know there was ever a crack there and it is just as strong as it was before. You overfill with material and sand it down to be nice and smooth. I would not do this on the fuse box cover. I would use a razor knife and trim off the excess and then take a small butane torch to that area only and give it a quick heat up to help blend it into the rest of the plastic. It is not going to look exactly identical but it will be really close.
 

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Oh I started working on the Lincoln today.. Sometimes I do hate myself when I know I should do something and I don't... The front passenger side axle is the only one I didn't replace. another part that at the time was no where to be found, not even an OE one was available..That axle has 180,000 miles on it. I knew I should have gotten on and just replaced the thing.. But NOOOO.. I said well I will check it out first and see what it's condition is like.. That axle has a driveshaft type deal with a carrier bearing on it. It comes as one whole piece. The "CV axle" does not come out of the driveshaft portion of it. Which really sucks. because the carrier bearing is no good but the CV joints are in great shape. So I can't replace just the bearing. I have to replace the whole bloody thing. It's gonna take a few days to get it because of course it is special order. and the thing runs 200 for a none OE and 300 for the OE. I am going to get the OE because the last one did fantastic in terms of longevity. and 100 bucks is not that much of a difference.

I will say that the PTO (transfer case) was shot. the seals in it went to hell a long time ago. There is no supposed to be any fluid that come out of the thing when you pull the axle out. maybe only a drip or 2. The entire PTO emptied when I pulled the axle out. I ended up having to pull the lower control arm off because the axle didn't come apart. Kinda sucked having to do the additional work.. but whatever.

I did break all 4 of the intermediate exhaust pipe to cat bolts. and they are studs not bolts. I am going to knock the studs out and use a piece of threaded rod and some nuts. The studs were put in before the flange was welded onto the cat, there is no way to replace the studs as there is not enough space between the flange and there the cat starts to slip them in.

I have the old one out and the new one put into place already. I just have to wait for the axle and then maybe another 15-20 minutes to put the passenger side suspension back together. I will have about 2 hours total put into the job by time I am done.. book says almost 6 hours to do this job.. Really?!???! I am going to be at 2 without a lift and using wrenches and ratchets no air tools. Oh and it's 20 degrees out and snowing and I do not have a garage.... so I am outside. I am also 45 years old. so not a spring chicken either. Think people are getting ripped off at a dealershit when they get mechanical work done? I do...


It's funny because when I picked up the PTO from the dealership I stopped in at the service counter and asked how much they charge to replace the PTO. I was told 2400.. the cost of the PTO was a tad over 1000.00 so there is 1200 in labor for a 6 hour job. the posted shop rate was 150 per hour.. so if I can change the thing in 2 and I have never done one before and I am outside in the cold with no air tools and no lift I think they can accomplish the same thing. so they are charging 600 per hour.. HOLY CRAP!.. even if I used the 6 hours that is 233 an hour. I asked what the shop hour rate was and I was told 175. I said to the guy.. 1400 for a book stated 6 hour job is not 175 an hour. and that 2400 did not include tax or any other fees that was labor and the part only. I looked at the guy shook my head and walked away..
 
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