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Just wanted to know what you guys with cars are doing. I believe from an old forum suggested you should be running standard oil for the first 10,000 KM and then going to synthetic oil after complete burn in.
 

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Was more intrested in what people where actually doing than the discussion on why or why not.
 

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xyz1 said:
Was more intrested in what people where actually doing than the discussion on why or why not.
I think that is the closest you will get ... just wait and you will see. ;) With over 100 posts ... most agreed to disagree. JMHO However, Excelsior just changed his at 1000 miles and he is the only person that I have seen post anything.
 

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I plan on putting premium in it. If I go on a long road trip I may put a few tanks of reg. just to keep the cost low. But most of the time I will be using Premium.
 

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SlipSlider said:
I plan on putting premium in it. If I go on a long road trip I may put a few tanks of reg. just to keep the cost low. But most of the time I will be using Premium.
:lol: Either you are joking, or in the wrong thread ... ;)
 

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Hi Wayne ;

I will be switching over to synthetic after the 5000 km oil change

I have done this on other cars I have owned and never had any problems

I keep my cars for 10 years and 250,000 km

Well , maybe the Solstice till I die

Ross
 

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If the synthetic oil company gives a recommendation, I would be inclined to
go with them. In actuality, the rings need to seat, and cars vary as
to howmany miles we're taklking about. Until they are fully seated, they will
use oil. I have heard of engine rings not seating until 12,000 miles, although
this seems to be the exception. Probably the best way is simply to use regularoil until the oil usage drops. Then I think you can rest assured that
the rings have seated and can switch over to synthetic. For me, there's
no real reason for rushing over to synthetics.
As for using high test gas, the only time when that made sense was way back before gasoline companies started putting detergents in their gas to prevent fuel injector clogging. Now it simply throwing money away - the
only purpose of the extra octane is to prevent detenation in high compression engines, of which there are few around (the Miata requires high test (since 2001), another good reason for not buying one).
 

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lightning rod said:
Hi Wayne ;

I will be switching over to synthetic after the 5000 km oil change

I have done this on other cars I have owned and never had any problems

I keep my cars for 10 years and 250,000 km

Ross
I've never used synthetic oil and always keep my cars for well over 100K miles. I've never had any oil related failure, and have never used oil at high mileage.
 

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kingarthur said:
As for using high test gas, the only time when that made sense was way back before gasoline companies started putting detergents in their gas to prevent fuel injector clogging. Now it simply throwing money away - the
only purpose of the extra octane is to prevent detenation in high compression engines, of which there are few around (the Miata requires high test (since 2001), another good reason for not buying one).
I believe that the Solstice is fairly high compression at 10.4. The recommendation is to use premium otherwise you will lose power, but you do not have to use more than 87
 

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Hi King Arthur ;

I may have mis-lead you with my comment.

I agree that any car will do very nicely with regular dino oil and last as long as it is well maintained. (your case in point)

I change to Synthetic for my own piece of mind.

I was trying to answer Waynes question, not really to start a debate of dino versus synthetic since this has been done many times over.

Actually most will say , they both work. Take your pick.

I like these type of discussions mostly over a beer , where shall we meet ;)

regards

Ross
 

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kingarthur said:
I've never used synthetic oil and always keep my cars for well over 100K miles. I've never had any oil related failure, and have never used oil at high mileage.
:agree: My 1997 Nissan Altima never has seen sythetic oil and it has >160,000. :thumbs: Never had any problems and change oil every 5000 miles. BTW ... I still get 34 mpg on the hwy. ;)
 

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10.4 IS high compression, Premium will make a difference and is reccomended

SolsticeDesire said:
I believe that the Solstice is fairly high compression at 10.4. The recommendation is to use premium otherwise you will lose power, but you do not have to use more than 87
It's slightly off topic, but I'll bite.... SolsticeDesire is exactly right.

The compression ratio of the Solstice is essentially as high as many of the "high performance" engines of the 60's. Granted, there were some exceptions such as some Dodge engines going above 12:1, but 10.4 is nothing to sneeze at, and 10:1 was and still is considered a high compression engine.

As has been posted on other threads, the Electronic Control Unit [ECU] or computer that drives the ignition and fuel injection, does have access to a knock, or pre-detonation sensor. If you run 87 in the engine, you'll probably hear a couple of pings at first, then none after the computer backs off the timing a bit.

What's going on is that an internal combustion engine works most smoothly when the peak cylinder pressure is achieved at about 15 degrees after top dead center [ATDC], and maximum engine torque is achieved without knock or ping. Lower octane fuels have swifter flame fronts, and do not burn as smoothly, so they require less spark advance to yield a peak pressure at 15 degrees ATDC. Because of the rapid burning, the pressures observed can also yield knock under conditions (such as high sustained cylinder and piston head temperatures due to high environmental temperatures and high load operation like high speed high power driving) even with a peak pressure at 15 degrees ATDC, the timing often has to be further retarded so as to eliminate knocking.

Knocking and pinging can and do cause engine damage, and can melt pistons. So, modern ECUs "listen" for knocking and back off the timing and richen the mixture to prevent it.

While it is true, that lower compression engines with compression ratios in the range of 8:1 to 9:1 will see only small benefits to using higher octane fuels, this is largely because the ECUs won't advance the spark past a certain point.

With High compression engines (and the Solstice with 10.4:1 is a high compression engine) can see great benefit from running higher octane fuel. The ECU can be set to permit fairly aggressive spark advance to bring the peak pressure toward that optimum 15 degrees ATDC.

I could go on, but the bottom line is that the Solstice has a high compression engine and will benefit from the use of higher octane fuels. GM says so, and so does the experimental data.

Is premium required? Well, you can run lower octane, but your engine will not be as powerful as it could, because the ECU will back off the timing and may richen the mixture a bit to try to keep the knocks and pings minimized.

Would I run 87? In a pinch, a very bad pinch, but I've yet to encounter a pinch that bad with my own vehicles.

Fortunately, the modern ignition and fuel control systems are able to keep you from burning up the motor by using lower octane fuel in a high compression engine.
 
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