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Discussion Starter #1
After enduring three years of high school Latin, I'd like to comment on the "Solsti" phenomenon before it gets out of hand.

The plural of Solstice is not Solsti. I've seen some forum members using that term, and I believe that a GM exec even used it in his blog.

Solstice is an English word, so the plural is Solstices. If you want to say Sol or Sols or something for short, fine. But Solsti? I guess that mindset there is that the word is "Solstus" and thus the plural would be Solsti (like alumnus/alumni, stimulus/stimuli, fungus/fungi, etc.).

Yes, Solstice is pronounced a bit like "solstus," but the Latin word is actually solstitium. So if you want a Latin plural, it's actually Solstitia. Wouldn't Sols be easier?
 

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What do most folks call glasses of a popular Vodka? Stolis.

What do you call a bunch of boob tubes? TVs in the U.S., Tellys in U.K.

"Televisions" doesn't roll off the toungue. Neither does "Stolichnayas." Add "Solstices" to the list....too many ssss sounds.

You're right on the proper form, buy you can't stop slang.

Sols might not work...Remember the Honda Civic del Sol?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Solace said:
What do most folks call glasses of a popular Vodka? Stolis.

What do you call a bunch of boob tubes? TVs in the U.S., Tellys in U.K.
"Stolis" and "Tellys" both end in 's'!

If someone wanted to say Solsties, I wouldn't complain. But the pseudo-Latin "Solsti" thing is just dumb since the singular is not Solstus.
 

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Nonsense......

Aardvark said:
"Stolis" and "Tellys" both end in 's'!

If someone wanted to say Solsties, I wouldn't complain. But the pseudo-Latin "Solsti" thing is just dumb since the singular is not Solstus.
Tomatoes, To"ma"toes, Potatoes, Po"ta"toes, need I say more!
:lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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240ZRX7MiataSol said:
i before e except after c. So their!
Grammatically, it would be "so there", not "so their."
 

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:lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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I think I just woke up and I am in 12th grade English class. :lol:
 

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Semper ubi sub ubi, for anyone who ever took latin in grade school. :lol:

(Favorite espression to write on the blackboard while teacher away)
 

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"Always where under where." Good play on words! :lol:
 

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Solstices sounds like it would be right to me too, but I am sure Solsti is going to catch on because of how it sounds.

At any rate, I like to call them Sols. It is short and to the point. I have been using it in normal conversation too (Sol and Sols) to refer to this car.

The Sky enthusiasts have it made in this regard! :lol:
 

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240ZRX7MiataSol said:
Chose "their" because it violates the "i" before "e" rule. Kind of a joke.
Technically, it does not violate the full rule:

"I" before "e", except after "c", or when sounded like "ay" as in "neighbor" or "weigh". :)

You've just got to love the english language. My favorite is the "ough" as exemplified by the Suess phrase: "The tough guy coughs as he ploughs through the dough." Five words with "ough" and five different sounds. :lol:

--Chemist (should have been an English teacher ;) )
 

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Yeah ... I'm pretty sure everybody knows that "Solsti" isn't the proper plural form. But it's become one of those goofy little phrases around here that sounds kind of funny and seems to have caught on here quite well. And the fact that it was used (in parentheses and with a question mark) in a GM blog seemed to be an obvious joke and a friendly tip of the hat to us forum guys since it's become so common around here. Anyway ... spell it however you like, but let's keep those Solsti rolling. :)
 

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SlySol said:
Yeah ... I'm pretty sure everybody knows that "Solsti" isn't the proper plural form. But it's become one of those goofy little phrases around here that sounds kind of funny and seems to have caught on here quite well. And the fact that it was used (in parentheses and with a question mark) in a GM blog seemed to be an obvious joke and a friendly tip of the hat to us forum guys since it's become so common around here. Anyway ... spell it however you like, but let's keep those Solsti rolling. :)
:agree: Lets not get too serei about the Solsteye eieio
 

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Aardvark said:
After enduring three years of high school Latin, I'd like to comment on the "Solsti" phenomenon before it gets out of hand.

The plural of Solstice is not Solsti. I've seen some forum members using that term, and I believe that a GM exec even used it in his blog.

Solstice is an English word, so the plural is Solstices. If you want to say Sol or Sols or something for short, fine. But Solsti? I guess that mindset there is that the word is "Solstus" and thus the plural would be Solsti (like alumnus/alumni, stimulus/stimuli, fungus/fungi, etc.).

Yes, Solstice is pronounced a bit like "solstus," but the Latin word is actually solstitium. So if you want a Latin plural, it's actually Solstitia. Wouldn't Sols be easier?
Have we established that it is masculine or feminine?
 

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Chemist said:
Technically, it does not violate the full rule:

"I" before "e", except after "c", or when sounded like "ay" as in "neighbor" or "weigh". :)

You've just got to love the english language. My favorite is the "ough" as exemplified by the Suess phrase: "The tough guy coughs as he ploughs through the dough." Five words with "ough" and five different sounds. :lol:

--Chemist (should have been an English teacher ;) )
Yep, and it's interesting that words often eventually become accepted, and sometimes the improper word has been used over and over again by educators. I can think of a couple of examples: prioritize, which is not proper because priority is not a verb., and irregardless, which would really mean the opposite of regardless!
 
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