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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having just returned from Pennsylvania today I was wondering how the Solstice handles the hilly and mountainous terrain, is it powerful enough to handle the grade? Does it have power to spare?
 

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Gearing's a bit tall, so on inclines, don't slip the clutch...

OZ40 said:
Having just returned from Pennsylvania today I was wondering how the Solstice handles the hilly and mountainous terrain, is it powerful enough to handle the grade? Does it have power to spare?
Sure. If you down shift, it will pull very hard. It won't have much pull up a grade in 5th, but it will still accelerate.

Just this evening, I rounded a left hand inclined sweeper from the East bound 134 to the North bound 2 Fwy and had to shift from 3 to 4th at the red-line somewhere around 95. It pulled fairly strong up past 105 before I backed out and got in the binders for merging onto the 2.

Where you will notice the tall gearing is in steep parking lots in first gear. I've heated up my clutch enough to smell it when trying to navigate the lot. Also, don't try to climb a steep driveway incline from a stop in 2nd--it's just too tall and you'll stall it. (Yup, I did that). :blush:

The reason is that the engine has enough torque to fool you into thinking you're in the right gear.

Just as an example of how much torque you do have on tap, the Solstice will, when launched with some good revs, spin the rear tires from a stop, and a snappy shift from 1st to 2nd will reliably bark the tires. The 2-3 shift will only slip the accessory drive belts, but hey! it's only a 4 cylinder! ;) It's not the little duce coup of Beach Boys fame which got rubber in all 4 gears, but it will get rubber in 1st, and from 1st to 2nd.

Bottom line, don't slip the clutch too much, or you'll get it very hot very fast. Parking lots are best done with purpose and more speed than the bingo-playing, flying-dutchman-sun-hat barely-visible-above-the-dash set. Rev it up, let out the clutch, and cruise around the parking lot briskly--with your foot OFF of the clutch.

Also when parking, STOP EARLY! as you pull into a space. The nose is MUCH longer than you think, and parking curbs are taller than the front facia by about 1/2 to 2 inches!! If you forget, you'll definitely scrape the chin.

There's no harm in stopping where you think you're too far, hopping out (remember to pull up on the door lock by reaching over your shoulder) and walk around front to look. It's WAY better to be sure than sorry.

Hope this helps.
 

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Thanks for the tips!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanx!

Thanks for the tips. I'm no stranger to clutches, I learned to drive one on a "three on the tree" Ford F-100, but each clutch is different. I remember on the old Ford that I had to let that pedal come up at least 4 inches before the clutch would grab. Good leg workout!
 

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While we're talking performance

What will it take to get from the 177hp of a stock motor to 200? Is it doable with exhaust, cold air intake and a chip/dyno tune ?? I'm thinking things like camshafts and the like would have to be a GM accessory the variable valve timing would really make it difficult for the aftermarket camshaft industry to step in. Could a savvy chip tuner use that variable valve timing for a nice boost? How far can this motor go with bolt on type mods? btw I know that bolting on a supercharger will increade the power nicely but I'ld like to keep this discussion limited to normally aspirated. What combination of parts, throttle bodies, headers, cat back, chips etc will it take to get to 200??
 

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I believe if you do the entire exhaust setup, headers, pipe and muffler/cat back plus cold air intake and good tune the 200HP is there and probably a bit more.
 

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Why do I hear it is bad on the clutch to coast or ride with your foot down?

I mean, the engine is separated from the clutch plate at ths point, so how is that bad?
 

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Fortimir said:
Why do I hear it is bad on the clutch to coast or ride with your foot down?

I mean, the engine is separated from the clutch plate at ths point, so how is that bad?
I would like to hear the answer to this as well.

Where you at, Crimson??

- bspate -
 

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taken from http://www.porschepark.org/garage/tech.html:

Whenever you are stopped for a traffic light, throw the gear lever into neutral and let the clutch pedal out. Even though you may miss a second or two by having to put the pedal down and engage first gear when the light turns green, you will save much wear on both the clutch disc and release bearing. If you are uncomfortable about that semi waiting behind you, just watch the opposing light and go into first gear when you see it change to yellow. Any time you touch the clutch pedal, the internal parts of the clutch are wearing against each other, even if the pedal is all the way down. You would not want to rest your foot on the clutch pedal while driving, even lightly, for the same reason. The only condition under which the clutch will not wear is when the pedal is completely out and untouched. The same holds true for the shift lever; even the slight pressure of a resting hand is enough to cause wear on the shift forks inside the transmission, especially when multiplied over thousands of miles of driving.
 

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OBXSOL said:
taken from http://www.porschepark.org/garage/tech.html:

Whenever you are stopped for a traffic light, throw the gear lever into neutral and let the clutch pedal out. Even though you may miss a second or two by having to put the pedal down and engage first gear when the light turns green, you will save much wear on both the clutch disc and release bearing. If you are uncomfortable about that semi waiting behind you, just watch the opposing light and go into first gear when you see it change to yellow. Any time you touch the clutch pedal, the internal parts of the clutch are wearing against each other, even if the pedal is all the way down. You would not want to rest your foot on the clutch pedal while driving, even lightly, for the same reason. The only condition under which the clutch will not wear is when the pedal is completely out and untouched. The same holds true for the shift lever; even the slight pressure of a resting hand is enough to cause wear on the shift forks inside the transmission, especially when multiplied over thousands of miles of driving.
:agree: Well said. I have gotten many miles from my clutches by using these techniques.
 
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