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Discussion Starter #1
I just got my copy from Pontiac and the SOL is on the cover:) :cool: :willy:

quote: "Here comes the SOLSTICE"
"It has a tight, purposeful look as if it were shrink wrapped around the driver".

6 pages of pics and comments, one which states, quote :"officially available come June"


:willy: :willy: :willy:
 

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Frosty said:
Would it be possible to get it scanned?

Sorry, my scanner is out of commision. Maybe someone else that received a copy will be able to post it.
 

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HYPUR said:
Sorry, my scanner is out of commision. Maybe someone else that received a copy will be able to post it.
Just remember that it is copyrighted material owned by the photographer and magazine and that if you ask the right person (check inside the cover) you can post it the right way with proper references and permissions, maybe they will even give you digital pics, seeing that it's us asking.

Or you could wait till someone else steals it onto the web, and once there its free game.
 

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Flagrantly lifted from C&G where it was posted by Josh, here is the article in question. INteresting read and VERY INTERESTING last comment.

In this months issue of "Pontiac Performance" there is an interview with interior designer Vicki Vlachakis obviously regarding the Pontiac Solstice. Below is the entire article courtesy of C&G. Jerome Miller did the interview with Miss Vlachakis.

"Designer Vicki Vlachakis forecasts a Solstice summer. From the Smokies to the Sierras, the 2006 Pontiac Solstice will be soaking up the sun and taming those twists and turns with abandon. And you may be one of the fortunate few at the helm of the newest America two-seat, no-compromise roadster when it's officially available come June.

Solstice saw the light of day in California, at the GM Advanced Studio, where the urge is to come up with future show cars. Inspiration for the rendering you see here was actually Pebble Beach, during a jaunt to the Monterey Historics - a popular annual event honoring the sport of vintage racing.

Entirely apropos, as Vlachaksi is quick to point out: Solstice takes a host of cues from some of the romantic, early ‘60’s European roadsters. Solstice flaunts great proportion, a long dash-to-axle ratio, short overhangs, a low ride, set-back seats, the venerable 177-hp Ecotec 2.4l twin-cam engine teamed with a close-ratio Aisin five-speed, and wheels pushed to the corners sans excessive wheel fat.

Vlachkis )PRONOUNCED Vla-ha-kis) has worked on five concept vehicles since she stared for you ears ago at the West Coast GM Studio - which was still under construction at the time. The self-assured 32-year old designer had experience at Mercedes’ and Audi in Europe before making the return move to her home state.


Why the car design in the first place?

I grew up in Pasadena, just a couple minutes from the Art Center College of Design. They offered select courses to local high school students, so I took them up on art classes. I knew I was going to be a designer, I just didn’t know where the energy was going to be directed. And then I became totally attracted to industrial design - Especially automotive - because it was this thing that embodied the latest trend, technology and existing art-work. And I just thought it would be the most interesting disciple to go I. I stayed at the Art Center, branching out to their campus in Switzerland, which is where I became really intrigued with European direction in design. That experience changed my perspective entirely.

And Southern California alters it daily.

You got that right. Just go shopping on a given Saturday and you’ll see all sorts of new and inspiring things, from people-watching to what’s on the shelves. Californians take pride in leading, rather than waiting for trends to hit, which is why the Advanced Studio is where it is.

What was your Solstice role?

When my sketch was picked, I basically became totally responsible for the interior. The cool thing early on is that we built the interior and exterior right next to each other throughout the program. That allowed the form language to really carry through the whole car, it’s really unity in the end product.

Why did you take Solstice beyond concept?

The acceptance by the press and public was unreal. So much that a new rear-wheel-drive Kappa architecture was developed to enable production. Not only that, it’s virtually unheard of for designers who do the concept car to also do the production version. But when it happened, I went through the whole process, including working at the Tech Center in Detroit for a year.

How did that go?

Youl earn a little something every time you do a project. The Solstice project was intense. But I think that schedule was to our benefit, because people weren’t given the chance to rethink everything. They didn’t change their mind about stuff. If you have too much time, you end up reworking everything and losing your original intention. In actuality, I’d never done an interior before. For six years prior to that when I did car design it was always an exterior fact. I did my part all on the fly. The funny thing is, I don’t think anyone realized it. I never said anything, I just played along: Like year, sure, I know what you’re talking about.

Did it really matter?

I’ve got to say there’s never an ideal place to begin the learning experience; you just jump right in. I think with any good designer who’s interested and motivated, they’ll learn it on the go.

Let’s talk Solstice in detail.

It’s a driver-oriented theme. Basically, all the controls lay on an instrument panel that wraps around you. I spent a lot of time detailing out the gauges, the shifter, the seats, all of the main touch points tat the driver would interface with. The great thing is, people say it looks much more expensive that it is. The seats were skinned and structured to be very dynamic and really hold you into the vehicle.

How do colors come into play?

The interior color scheme is an evolution of the concept car. I devised it based on fashion forecasting and current trends. Solstice has a very muted tone-on-tone scheme, where it’s more like cool grays and warm grays instead of your typical black. It’s not a lot of high contrast; there’s a richer, much more muted appeal. For inspiration, I naturally look to fashion, architecture and product design rather than other cars. If you look to other design disciplines, then you might bring something innovative to the mix.


Why the grab handle in the middle?

The center-mounted grab handle off the instrument panel was one of the key touch points on Solstice. Not only is it an ideal place to reach, it communicates that this roadster is made for winding roads. There’s one on each door also. Something you may not have noticed: There’s a number of neat storage features, from the glove box to tuck-aways between the seats. Plus three cupholders. And don’t over-look the chrome detailing that adds a jewelry-like aspect.

Jewelry?

In a generic sort of way. There are a few jewelry bits here and there on the exterior, to keep it sparkling. For instance, the bright surround of the windshield, which keeps the body of Solstice looking clean. And those wide fender vents that were designed around the Pontiac arrowhead logo as an iconic cue. Jewelry or not, the Solstice makes you look good.

What’s down the road?
I’ve developed Solstice out past the first year, but you’ll have to wait until we officially reveal those plans."
 

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HYPUR said:
I just got my copy from Pontiac and the SOL is on the cover:) :cool: :willy:

quote: "Here comes the SOLSTICE"
"It has a tight, purposeful look as if it were shrink wrapped around the driver".

6 pages of pics and comments, one which states, quote :"officially available come June"


:willy: :willy: :willy:
Where can I get that magazine!? :willy: :willy:
 

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The acceptance by the press and public was unreal. So much that a new rear-wheel-drive Kappa architecture was developed to enable production.
Re-affirms what Solsticeman had been saying previously about the platform being created because nothing else fit the bill.
 

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achieftain said:
What’s down the road?
I’ve developed Solstice out past the first year, but you’ll have to wait until we officially reveal those plans."
Wow, I have been debating on if I want the first year or a second year. I'm looking at the history of other cars, including the pontiac fiero, and it started getting better 2 1/2 years later. I won't be able to get a first 1000 car, but do I buy a first year, or wait and see what goodies they throw in the next year?
 

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DLD84 said:
Where can I get that magazine!? :willy: :willy:
Usually it is sent if you sign up and I forget How I had signed up or if it was sent automatically. Makes me mad now cause I have nor been getting it for a while. Guess I'll post an email to pontiac.com and request info. Follow my lead or race me there. :willy:
 

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I'm not a Chauvinist Pig, but I'm sure I remember a male designer doing this car. The article (I got the Pontiac Performance promotional rag too) states that Vicki Vlachakis (Solstice Production Car Design Manager) did the interior of the concept. It said nothing about the body/exterior. I've read that the orginal 'male' designer moved over to Ford. Can anyone confirm?

Also, I like the part about June Delivery!!! Got my popcorn ready for the Apprentice!
 

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RADRIV said:
I'm not a Chauvinist Pig, but I'm sure I remember a male designer doing this car. The article (I got the Pontiac Performance promotional rag too) states that Vicki Vlachakis (Solstice Production Car Design Manager) did the interior of the concept. It said nothing about the body/exterior. I've read that the orginal 'male' designer moved over to Ford. Can anyone confirm?

Also, I like the part about June Delivery!!! Got my popcorn ready for the Apprentice!
There was. His name is unspellable to me though. He designed the Solstice and Chevy SS concept. He left GM for Mazda a couple months ago officially.

Danno: Look at this image;
http://www.solsticeforum.com/photopost/showphoto.php?photo=132&size=big&sort=2&cat=3012
The grab handle is the one next to the gear shifter, along with the ones in each door.
 

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RADRIV said:
I'm not a Chauvinist Pig, but I'm sure I remember a male designer doing this car. The article (I got the Pontiac Performance promotional rag too) states that Vicki Vlachakis (Solstice Production Car Design Manager) did the interior of the concept. It said nothing about the body/exterior. I've read that the orginal 'male' designer moved over to Ford. Can anyone confirm?

Also, I like the part about June Delivery!!! Got my popcorn ready for the Apprentice!
The exterior of the Sol was designed by a male, Franz Von Holzhausen in particular. Your also correct that he is no longer with GM. he is now the Mazda North American Operations Design Director.
 

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Thanks Solstice Man/Super Moderator!

You really know your threads.

Why people jump jobs...

1) Unhappy with job, not challenged
2) Not enough money
3) The Company's uncertain future
4) Weak products compared to competition

I'm thinking that Franz was looking for more money (good timing since he could leverage the clout that Solstice gave him for more cash) and maybe #3. But why Ford/Mazda? They are doing just as bad as GM.

?

RadRiv
 

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other reasons people jump jobs

1. better pay
2. new opportunities
3. change of scenery
4. being "headhunted" aka sought out because of your reputation or skills by the new employer
5. build up more (different) experience

Franz came to GM from somewhere else most likely (edited: found a line in a news article about the original announcement "Prior to his time at GM, von Holzhausen served as Assistant Chief Designer for Volkswagen")
 

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Frosty said:
Franz came to GM from somewhere else most likely (edited: found a line in a news article about the original announcement "Prior to his time at GM, von Holzhausen served as Assistant Chief Designer for Volkswagen")
Don't think I see any of the new Beetle's bud vase in the Sol, maybe a little Tourareg front fender. I like what he did and can't wait to touch it for real.
 

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RADRIV said:
Thanks Solstice Man/Super Moderator!

You really know your threads.

Why people jump jobs...

1) Unhappy with job, not challenged
2) Not enough money
3) The Company's uncertain future
4) Weak products compared to competition

I'm thinking that Franz was looking for more money (good timing since he could leverage the clout that Solstice gave him for more cash) and maybe #3. But why Ford/Mazda? They are doing just as bad as GM.

?

RadRiv
I believe that Franz grew up in CA and was also prolly tired of MI. Maybe he has family or just hated MI?

The funny thing is, since Mazda is at least heavily influenced by Ford (Ford owns something like 30-40% of Mazda), he might end up back in Dearborn MI...
 
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