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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I found a full front and rear kit of slotted/drilled rotors for the solstice on eBay and was wondering if powerstop is a good brand. They are pretty inexpensive and look nice. Would it be recommended to change the rotors and pads even if I've never done it before? Any tips? I know the rear pistons require a special tool. .
 

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Nothing wrong with them, I've got them on a couple of cars. There are better pads out there than the Evolution pads that usually come with them. But then again, for the money, there's nothing wrong with them, either. As far as a special tool goes, if the pistons aren't jammed, one of the old pads and a C clamp is all you'll need to compress the pistons.
 

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I am sure you will get lots of good advice.

My thinking goes like this.

The electronic systems on the car are relatively robust but can be screwed up.

The if it aint broke dont F with it rule always applies

I checked with people who know more than I do and was told that the stock rotors are more than adequate for anything close to leagal that you will do or encounter on the street and not too bad for some track work.

the factory pads are not very good and the overall brake performance can be greatly improved by replacing the factory pads with better after market pads.

Drilling looks good but my experience with drilled rotors has been consistently . . . bad.

Buying inexpensive brake parts from eBay is worse than buying them out of the back of a truck down at the rail yard.

:grouphug:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your input Rob. Have your rotors cracked? Been looking up info and that appears to be the main problem.. is slotted about as bad?
 

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Had a conversation last fall with Dave at DDM about drilled rotors and he said he's never had an issue with drilled rotors. With extreme track use there could be issues but none he had encountered with the rotors he carries.
 

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^
:agree:

I've had them on my Solstice for 3 years with 0 issues. That's with several annual spirited runs and a couple of track days per year. PowerStops aren't light racing rotors. They're pretty beefy. The only thing I did was upgrade the pads to EBC Red from the Evolution pads that come with the kit.
 

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Whether drilled are bad or not, slotted are at least as good, if not better, for longevity.

As far as a special tool goes, if the pistons aren't jammed, one of the old pads and a C clamp is all you'll need to compress the pistons.
No, NO and NO!! You CANNOT just compress the rear pistons with a c-clamp. Or you WILL bugger them up. They need to be pushed and screwed in, hence the need for a 'special tool' (or at least a pair of needle nose pliers - though those make it a lot tougher).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Any idea where I can obtain this special tool you speak of? :D

Also, must I bleed the brakes before pushing the piston in, or is it not required? *scratches head*
 

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Any decent auto parts store should carry the tool you will need I picked mine up at Advance Auto and they are not that expensive. As for the brake question I have R1 Concept drilled and slotted rotors and Hawk ceramic pads on my car and this is not the first car I have used this set up on and have had no issues with them .You should not have to bleed your brakes if all you are doing is replacing the rotors and pads .
 

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What StingYa said. Plus you may find that since Advanced Auto, AutoZone etc do tool loaners... you may be able to just borrow them. By the way it's a VERY good idea to rotate the pistons ALL the way in when you do this, to improve the parking brake operation.

This is the type of the brake tools you need (though the cheap 6-way box type would work too, except most don't have a side that will fit without modifying the tool)...

 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wow that looks great. Just to be sure, pushing/screwing the pistons in wont cause an overflow or contamination of any kind, would it? I think I can DIY but I just want to be sure I dont damage anything or abs or whatever. Hmmm
 

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I'm not a fan of pushing brake fluid back into the master cylinder against the direction of the check valve and seal lips. Cracking the bleed valves ( with hose attached) isn't that difficult, then compressing the caliper, then locking bleed valves. Bleeding the brakes isn't difficult if needed, and it freshens the system with new fluid.
Never cut corners unless your racing !
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Okay, so to be sure, the best thing to do is crank open the bleed valve, push the piston in, and add more brake fluid? I'll be attempting this soon so want to be sure everything goes as smoothly as possible.
 

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I'm not a fan of pushing brake fluid back into the master cylinder against the direction of the check valve and seal lips. Cracking the bleed valves ( with hose attached) isn't that difficult, then compressing the caliper, then locking bleed valves. Bleeding the brakes isn't difficult if needed, and it freshens the system with new fluid.
Never cut corners unless your racing !
:agree:
And there are easy ways to do it!:thumbs:
 

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I am sure you will get lots of good advice.

I checked with people who know more than I do and was told that the stock rotors are more than adequate for anything close to leagal that you will do or encounter on the street and not too bad for some track work.
Yup - stock discs and calipers are just fine.

Whether drilled are bad or not, slotted are at least as good, if not better, for longevity.
Agree. I have personal experience with rotors developing cracks radiating from drilled holes, so avoid them as they really aren't necessary for street or mild competition use, and even then, the slotted rotors do all that the drilled ones can anyway.

I also agree that the stock pads are crap for anything other than a grocery getter. I have to wonder why they specced those pads when they could have fitted a better one without suffering warm up issues like we did back in the Dark Ages - modern compounds operate right from cold.

Must have just been a price thing - why lavish better pads on a public that except for 5% of them would never know the difference?

I have some brake related stuff going on with my car right now but I'll report back once it is completed in a new thread.
 

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The service manual warns you to reduce the volume in the reservoir before compressing the front pistons, or turning in the rear pistons, to avoid overflow; I guess they assume it has been topped off, as the pads wear.
 

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What StingYa said. Plus you may find that since Advanced Auto, AutoZone etc do tool loaners... you may be able to just borrow them. By the way it's a VERY good idea to rotate the pistons ALL the way in when you do this, to improve the parking brake operation.

This is the type of the brake tools you need (though the cheap 6-way box type would work too, except most don't have a side that will fit without modifying the tool)...

:agree::agree: I purchased mine from a local Harbor Freight for about $40, probably find them cheaper though. Funny thing, I haven't seen a Harbor Freight advertisement for quite a while, hmmm, ever since my wife accused me of treating it like it was a playboy :eek: :lol:
 

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Yeah I bought the Harbor Freight one a few weeks ago too.
 
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