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My 2008 GXP's odometer turned 110K and now overdue on manufacturers recommendation of replacing the spark plugs.
I went to my AC/Delco dealer and got my new plugs and coils. I got everything off easy enough but I put
my plug socket with an extension and a 3/8" drive and could not break the seal on any of the plugs. I have
some PB catalyst (Liquid Wrench type Aerosol) and sprayed it generously around the plugs to attempt break
them free. I have tried about every hour for the past 12. Even tapped the ratchet lightly with a mallet.
What gives? Should I keep on what I am doing. I could pull on that ratchet harder and even fit a cheater on
it, but I am afraid I'll break the porcelain or worse. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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Run the car and try to change them while they are still hot from driving it.
 

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Just out of curiosity, why are you swapping coils? They're not really wear items.

Also, unless your plugs are fouled or burned, or you have any sort of issues that might be caused by bad plugs, why change them? If they're working, it's a waste of money.

Now, fluid maintenance - that's something that you should really pay attention to. But, the manufacturer's suggestion to change functional parts makes no sense. I had a shop tell me that I needed to change my shocks because they were old. I autocross and track the car - they worked fine.
 

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Cool. Put some anti-seize compound on the new ones.
 

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Cool. Put some anti-seize compound on the new ones.
x2, it's standard practice for me, esp with my Avalanche since it has aluminum heads.
 

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Just out of curiosity, why are you swapping coils? They're not really wear items.

Also, unless your plugs are fouled or burned, or you have any sort of issues that might be caused by bad plugs, why change them? If they're working, it's a waste of money.

Now, fluid maintenance - that's something that you should really pay attention to. But, the manufacturer's suggestion to change functional parts makes no sense. I had a shop tell me that I needed to change my shocks because they were old. I autocross and track the car - they worked fine.
110k on original plugs is about 10k overdue... plugs are a wear item you replace them before they are completely worn out, not when you have a misfire... it's called preventative maintenance... As far as shocks, they have life expectancy of about 50k-75k depending on the driving conditions, just because the car is not bouncing around, doesn't mean that they aren't worn out, the oil inside the shock breaks down just like any other fluid...
 

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If you do it when the engine is hot, use the penetrating oil, and also use an impact wrench set on low torque (it seems to shock things free when steady and even much higher pressure fails) they should come out. Glad you got yous out as having a plug break off in an alloy head is not nice! Had it happen at the track one day.

I always carried a bottle of Permatex Copper Antiseize in the race car spares box after that! Never had the problem again.

Some cars are particularly prone to this - my DOHC 4 cylinder in the race car gets water sitting in the plug wells if you shut off on a rainy day, and my V6 Fieros had a front bank of plugs that were often neglected as you had to change them by feel while assuming a position that resembled attempted congress with the engine bay.
 

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Hey raygun, for the record, my plugs are changed at 50k intervals. And it's all because of the pressure and airflow with the turbo in the motor. While you typically can let them go to 100k, if you're tuned, I'd do them every 50k-75k just to make sure they stay gapped appropriately and have the proper spark. Just my $0.02. I'm almost certain you are running a different spark plug then the OE with the 6758 turbo....right? If not, you should probably look into that!
 

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A time consuming curse, 99% of every threaded fastener on my cars that I remove gets either anti-seize, threadlocker, or silicone grease depending on the fastener and environment. Experiences with nuts/bolts backing out and seized nuts/bolts are the prime motivators to invest here. I get anxious when I go to assemble something without using any product. <- Yes I am an Engineer (in-training, always).
 

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A time consuming curse, 99% of every threaded fastener on my cars that I remove gets either anti-seize, threadlocker, or silicone grease depending on the fastener and environment. Experiences with nuts/bolts backing out and seized nuts/bolts are the prime motivators to invest here. I get anxious when I go to assemble something without using any product. <- Yes I am an Engineer (in-training, always).
Good comment.
We have a high population of engineers on this forum for some reason. You are in good company. What flavor?

We even have had linguistic anthropologists here. They come in and correct the engineers on a frequent basis. >:)
 

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The factory service manual has specific language to not use anti seize on the spark plugs:

Notice: Refer to Fastener Notice.

"Notice: Do not coat spark plug threads with anti-seize compound. If anti-seize compound is used and spark plugs are over-torqued, damage to the cylinder head threads may result.

Install the spark plugs.

Tighten the plugs to 20 N.m (15 lb ft).

The spark plug gap is 1.1 mm (0.45 in).

Apply dielectric compound to the spark plug boots and make sure no corrosion is present.
Install the ignition coil(s)."
 

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A lot of the electrical problems with older cars comes from lack of proper assembly.

Lucas wiring got a bad rap because the little bullet connectors, which are actually quite good mechanically, eventually corrode in place and stop conducting. If the factory had done what I do, removing the bullets, clean them and reassemble using dielectric grease, their wiring harnesses would still be working reliably.

BTW, I have seen arguments (don't recall if it was here) about whether you should use conductive grease or nonconductive (dielectric) grease in that sort of application. IMHO the points of contact mechanically between the metal parts are sufficient to make a sound junction and slathering a joint with conductive grease just invites short circuits.

Many hobbyists seem to work on the 'if a little is good, more must be better' theory. When applied to things like silicone sealant as gasket substitutes, it can lead to engine failure. I race an engine long obsolete and without a ready supply of gaskets. It is always assembled with silicone and a couple of gaskets made up by me. No problems with too much silicone sealant used, nor with great globs of it squeezing out and travelling through the oiling system to cause issues.

Similarly, all of the fasteners on my old engines get thread locker instead of sheet metal lock washers (as per original) that compress and do not allow consistent torque values to be attained.
 

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Good comment.
We have a high population of engineers on this forum for some reason. You are in good company. What flavor?

We even have had linguistic anthropologists here. They come in and correct the engineers on a frequent basis. >:)
Engineers like continuous improvement and our Solstice can use improvement, maybe haha?

I am in Automotive Engineering, fields ranging from racing valve springs, crash bumpers, and now I am a Development Engineer supporting a OEM hybrid transmission program.
 

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The factory service manual has specific language to not use anti seize on the spark plugs:

Notice: Refer to Fastener Notice.

"Notice: Do not coat spark plug threads with anti-seize compound. If anti-seize compound is used and spark plugs are over-torqued, damage to the cylinder head threads may result.

Install the spark plugs.

Tighten the plugs to 20 N.m (15 lb ft).

The spark plug gap is 1.1 mm (0.45 in).

Apply dielectric compound to the spark plug boots and make sure no corrosion is present.
Install the ignition coil(s)."
Damned if we do (over-torque the spark plug)

Damned if we don't (seized spark plug)
 

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Hey raygun, for the record, my plugs are changed at 50k intervals. And it's all because of the pressure and airflow with the turbo in the motor. While you typically can let them go to 100k, if you're tuned, I'd do them every 50k-75k just to make sure they stay gapped appropriately and have the proper spark. Just my $0.02. I'm almost certain you are running a different spark plug then the OE with the 6758 turbo....right? If not, you should probably look into that!
Ummm... I'm pretty sure I've got stock-spec plugs.

What plugs would you recommend?
 

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IDK....I don't have a 6758 turbo, but I do remember that there are some threads about spark blow-out because of the higher boost. One thread regarding the 6758 says to use OE and gap to .030 or .032. While other threads are saying to use a different NGK, but I can't remember the number. At any rate, the thread I found said to stick with a new set of OE plugs gapped to .030 or .032 with a 6758 turbo but I know there's more threads out there on it.
 

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I always use antisieze on spark plugs and any fastener going into dissimilar metals, especially aluminum. If I don't have mfgrs specs for wet torque, I lower the torque about 15% to 20%. Never had any problems with stuck plugs or stripped threads. Don't worry about being dead on the numbers, most torque wrenches will vary +/- 10%.
 

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I always use antisieze on spark plugs and any fastener going into dissimilar metals, especially aluminum. If I don't have mfgrs specs for wet torque, I lower the torque about 15% to 20%. Never had any problems with stuck plugs or stripped threads. Don't worry about being dead on the numbers, most torque wrenches will vary +/- 10%.
'zactly right, and it's fine to err a bit on the low end of the spectrum. You can always check again carefully for torque later. I do question the advice elsewhere on using an impact driver for removal, any thoughts? I just use a quality penetrant like SiliKroil and trust repeated heat/cool cycles & more doses of Kroil to do the job. IMHO spark plugs are too fragile to use an impact driver.
 
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