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Use this and it's off in 30 seconds. Not sure why you would use a chisel and a hammer and potentially damage a $400 part? :surprise:

Also, there is a very sensitive speed sensor in behind that hub (if you have ABS that is).

View attachment 59929

View attachment 59937
Can you please help show me I am an idiot so I can learn something here:

How is that puller deployed? Where does the screw jack touch and what does the horseshoe part touch?

GENERIC PICTURE FOUND ON GOOGLE Back side Front Knuckle:


GENERIC PICTURE FOUND ON GOOGLE Front side hub:
 

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The puller is used to separate the rear hub from the driveshaft.
If the hub won't slide out of the upright, and can't be pried out, the procedure may depend on what you are trying to save.
First choice, if you have one, would be a press.
Second choice, again if you have one, would be a large puller plus a block to span the hole in the hub.
If the hub is bad, my next choice would be to drive it out of the upright from the back.
If the hub is good and I was planning to re-use it I wouldn't have to worry about it, because a good hub wouldn't be that badly rusted.

No one has called you an idiot, only disagreed with your technique. If what you do works for you, no one else's opinion about it should matter.
 

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The puller is used to separate the rear hub from the driveshaft.
If the hub won't slide out of the upright, and can't be pried out, the procedure may depend on what you are trying to save.
First choice, if you have one, would be a press.
Second choice, again if you have one, would be a large puller plus a block to span the hole in the hub.
If the hub is bad, my next choice would be to drive it out of the upright from the back.
If the hub is good and I was planning to re-use it I wouldn't have to worry about it, because a good hub wouldn't be that badly rusted.

No one has called you an idiot, only disagreed with your technique. If what you do works for you, no one else's opinion about it should matter.
Those pictures are from google.

Thank you for your kind reply about the idiot. When I screw up, especially simple stuff, I am really hard on myself (I don't ever talk to myself, but when I do, I'm calling myself an idiot).
 

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Those pictures are from google.

Thank you for your kind reply about the idiot. When I screw up, especially simple stuff, I am really hard on myself (I don't ever talk to myself, but when I do, I'm calling myself an idiot).
I was not calling you an idiot. I'm sorry, but using a chisel and a hammer seems excessive, BUT, i did not realize how bad a condition your hubs were in. They probably need to be replaced anyways.

The pictures were taken in my garage on Wednesday. Anyone that has seen my build threads will be able to identify my tiled garage floor.

Procedure:

1. Remove the locking center nut on the axle
2. place the 'claws' on the inside edge of the hub (where the wheel studs are)
3. locate the center of the puller on the end of the axle (where the nut came off)
4. Use a big wrench and start turning. It may take some pretty decent torque for it to begin sliding off, but eventually it will.

Good luck!!
 

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For everyone reading this, please note that JohnWR and GXP-Coupe1 both did not call me an idiot, hint that I was an idiot, or indicate I'm an idiot. JohnWR and GXP-Coupe1 have nothing to do with my comment about an idiot. I called myself an idiot because I jumped to the conclusion that I missed something completely. They, being gentlemen, made after remarks to ensure they let me know they didn't call me an idiot, which is 100% true.


GXP-Coupe1 reply included an image of a removed hub and an image of a puller tool, so I jumped to the conclusion that he removed the hub from the knuckle with that puller tool. I still do not understand how that puller tool pulled the hub off the knuckle; so this feeling of not understanding indicates to me I am ignorant, so I felt okay with calling myself an idiot.

JohnWR pointed out there are better ways to remove a stuck hub from the knuckle that has minimal risk. I agree 1,000,000% with his suggestion IF I were to service another person's vehicle that is not my property. There is a huge massive difference in the way I do stuff for customers versus the way I do stuff for myself. For my personal vehicle, I will use my own discretion and experience on how to deal with challenges, it is of my opinion that the cave man method will work and I fully understand the risks involved and I also access how will I affect other's around me. I used my judgement and determined I am not risking anyone's safety, the chances of a hub breaking off because i smacked it with a hammer is unlikely, again it's my opinion based on my experience and knowledge.

GXP-Coupe1, I believe, has pointed out that you should use a puller tool to press out the AXLE shaft from the hub.



There are two elements we're discussing here:

1) Removing the AXLE SHAFT from the HUB

Service method 1: As GXP-Couple1 explained above, use the puller tool to press out the axle

Service method 2: Ghetto slam hammer the end of the axle with the axle nut sitting flush at the end of the axle threads to protect the threads explained in Steelmesh post from 6-13-2016

2) Removing the HUB from the KNUCKLE

Service method 1: Use slide hammer to pull out, DO NOT REUSE HUB

Service method 2: Create custom tooling to press out the hub on the vehicle, see JohnWR post above

Service method 3: Use a hammer and wedge/chisel, from Steelmesh post from 6-13-2016



Sketch of Steelmesh CAVE MAN method to remove stuck hub (Michigan Car):

I have extensive hands on experience and took extra care to ensure the hub was wedged off as evenly as possible. This method is likely "stretching" the knuckle hub bore (probably not permanent deformation). I have experience working at a company called Hayes-Lemmerz and worked as a suspension fatigue test technician. I kept test up by replacing broken knuckles, control arms and fixtures in the test facility, where we used large servo hydraulic cylinders (MTS) to stress the living crap out of these parts.
 

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Im going to be replacing my rear hubs soon, the front ones came out with an air chisel after a few minutes.
Do you have to disconnect the knuckle from anything to take the axles out?
Are you replacing the half-shaft axles?

Axle replacement:
Service resource says remove upper ball joint from the rear knuckle. You will also need a seal protection tool, it says the splines with damage the seal. Tool J-44394.

If you're just replacing the hub, then NO you will not need to mess with the knuckle.
 

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Back from the dead! About to do a rear hub.... Do I need to replace the axle nut when doing so? That going to be a dealer only item?
 

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Back from the dead! About to do a rear hub.... Do I need to replace the axle nut when doing so? That going to be a dealer only item?
There is no mention in the manual of replacing the nut, and I didn't when I replaced a hub about 6k miles ago.
 

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I hope you meant "replace the axle nut with a new one..."! When I read it first, I thought "only if you don't want your wheel to fall off" :lol:
I don't know how tongue-in-cheek that is, but just in case:

Actually, that wouldn't happen. The nut maintains a tight fit between axle shaft and hub, but does not retain the hub, so even without the nut the wheel is secure.
 
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