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Discussion Starter #1
I rarely think to take photos, and this is no exception. Both my original Solstice, a 2007, and my current one, a 2008, exhibited this issue:

On the cloth top, just above the side windows, is a stitched edge seam called 'welting'. Near the rear of each window where the top folds when down, is often a rub mark on that welting. It looks shiny sometimes, and sometimes, it wears thin or even through.

My current car just started exhibiting this. First thing to do is be careful and observe where the top might rub and wear in this area, and smooth out or otherwise nudge the material into a position so that it won't rub through when you're stowing or raising. This applies to every roadster owner: stopping damage before it has a chance to start is best.

If it's already started to wear through, I did something on my first car that I just did on my current one.

I took out a playing card, a black paint pen, a toothpick, a chunk of an old shirt, and two part 15-minute set epoxy. I put a dab of black paint on the card, squeezed out a little tiny amount of each part of the epoxy, and mixed all three with the toothpick. After a few minutes when the epoxy hasn't quite started to kick over, I used the toothpick to poke tiny bits of epoxy into the rubbed through area of the welting. No smearing or rubbing, and teeny amounts. The idea is to reinforce the damaged area a little bit, and stop the tearing by sealing off the broken threads. Making a big repair will be ugly. It could even promote further damage as the welting will not be flexible in that spot if you use too much. Use just a tiny bit. You're not re-making the welting, you're stopping more damage. No, use less than the bit you just thought of as tiny. You can add more later but you cannot ever remove that epoxy.

Poke some of that in, and wait a few minuets. The epoxy still on the card is your 'timer'. when it is almost set, use the bit of shirt and press it into the reinforced area of welting with your thumb and forefinger. This will make a little teensy bit of a cloth pattern in any epoxy that is on the top so it will be as un-noticeable as possible, and it will knock down the shine of the epoxy as well.

A good top place- such as a place that works on boat upholstery- can probably make repairs if you need them, but for me- I am confident in my skills here- this works well. If you think you might use too much, don't even try. And don't get 'streamers' of epoxy on the roof.Just a tiny toothpick tip full, pressed in like you're injecting it a tiny distance, in several spots to seal off the tear.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I should have mentioned- the top can even rub the fuzzy flocking on the inside of the trunk liner. You can sometimes see the mark. From the factory, there was heavy duty tape on the trunk gasket in that area to mitigate rubbing. It's easy to get some gray duct tape and apply it to the areas of the liner the top rubs too.
 

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Each post is a different issue. The top rubbing the window was fixed on many cars while still under warranty and in fact many tops were replaced when the tops was damaged. Adjusting the top can eliminate the rubbing.


TomatoSoup posted a fix some time ago that pulled back the trunk like so it no longer rubs on the top. Using gray duct tape that will break down over time will make a mess and you'll have a heck of a time cleaning off the adhesive residue down the road. You just need to pull back the trunk liner so there is more clearance.

 

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I use clear, slick masking tape in my trunk and put it where it's been rubbing...Never had an issue. This is a yearly maintenance item that I do every spring. Pull the old out, put new in.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Good thoughts Bob, and thanks for the links; it's nice to have one stop shopping.. I figure that most people know that any tape wears thin after rubbing. I mean, friction is what damaged the top sooo...I didn't feel a caveat was necessary about sticky tapes.

I have adjusted a convertible top once. Once. Installed them a few times and straightened a few bows. I'd rather install five tops than adjust one. It was a flipping nightmare, and I own the Dealer's illustrated parts manuals, the Assembly manual, the Fisher Body manual, and the complete set of Chassis manuals for that car. It's an art; that and front sheetmetal alignment. I'm passable at that. I just don't have the experience to work that magic on the top with confidence. The Kappa top is probably simple by comparison to my 1970 A body though, and I have my M car manuals now. So maybe.

Adjusting the trunk liner though, that seems a good solution. I always do the easy stuff that has less chance of disaster first in these cases. For now I found some extra heavy duty 3M packing tape that's almost as thick as the clear guard the factory put on the trunk weatherstrip to combat this issue. Works like the proverbial charm. I also have some extremely strong 3M strip adhesive and some precision plastic shim stock that is as smooth as glass. Might be worth a try. I'll see how long this thick tape lasts, but with the shims I would worry about the lead-in. It probably would be recessed though.

Exactly my thinking Ghost- it's so easy and so quick to replace it that I re-do things like that on my spring check-up before the car hits the road whether it is needed or not. These days that doesn't include stripping all the sheetmetal off the front and yanking the engine to check header gaskets and pan seals, lol. Daily driving a vintage car was worth it though; it never let me down if I just looked to see what might be going wrong first and I really dug being able to rip the car apart and put it back together. It was always easier to do that at the shop space than finding a leak when I actually needed the car, and then doing it in the driveway over a weekend when I should be tearing up the pave...errr....responsibly cruising. I can handle a strip of tape or two though, I reckon. I secretly enjoy cars that are a minor pain in the ass.
 

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The trunk liner can be held back with a small screw, if I remember correctly there is something behind the carpet that you can screw into.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The trunk liner can be held back with a small screw, if I remember correctly there is something behind the carpet that you can screw into.
With my luck it would be the rear quarter sheet metal
 

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