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Discussion Starter #1
I've done some searching, still have some questions:

1) It seems to me more people would be posting, talking, running run flats, but I'm not seeing that. Is it due to the much higher cost (run flats seem to be around $300/ea. vs. $150ish for stock performance)?

2) If you run them, have you ever experienced a flat? Were you able to drive some distance to get to a safe place or even get to a shop or home?

3) Perhaps run flats are a waste of money since the little compressor and fix a flat goop sitting in the trunk works for most flats?

4) I assume the run flats can be run with our vehicles that have the TPMS?

5) one option I've seen at tire rack are the Michelin PS2 ZP's (zero pressure), but it looks like the size is a 245/40ZR/18, so a little lower sidewall profile. Anyone running these? Would the lower profile mess with any of the speedo calibrations (depending on vehicle, speedo can be affected by changes in tire size, just not sure if a Solstice would be affected by this)?

Thanks for any feedback.
 

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Everything I've seen about run flats says they are heavy and harsh riding. Certainly the car mags always denigrate them whenever they test a car that has them standard.

Save your money. Just get a plug repair kit and keep it in the car.
 

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I have been running Run Flats for about 2 1/2 years. They are a harsher and nosier ride than the stocks. I see that you mention the Track. If I was even considering any kind of track runs I would not use Run Flats. I like the peace of mind that I get if I get a Flat I can drive around 50 miles on it before I get anywhere near the Rim.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have been running Run Flats for about 2 1/2 years. They are a harsher and nosier ride than the stocks. I see that you mention the Track. If I was even considering any kind of track runs I would not use Run Flats. I like the peace of mind that I get if I get a Flat I can drive around 50 miles on it before I get anywhere near the Rim.
I did read reviews that they give a stiffer ride. The Michelins are supposed to be one of the smoother ones, and they all state that due to the way the sidewall is made they actually grip and handle very well, though I never mentioned the track, won't be going there. I'm mainly trying to decide whether the greatly added expense and stiffer ride would be worth the added security of being able to drive the vehicle up to 50 miles if there was a complete flat. Or if maybe the stock little compressor and can of fix a flat (and perhaps a plug repair kit) would work to get us home as well. :thumbs:
 

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There have periodically been discussions about run flat tires on this forum.

They cost more, offer a harsher ride, are of limited life - they are good for ONE run flat cycle then need to be replaced in all the literature I have seen.

The consensus is you are much better off carrying a plug repair kit and keeping good conventional tires on the car.


http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f55/run-flat-tires-16408/

http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f43/gxp-tires-run-flats-11759/

http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f11/buy-run-flat-tires-not-60858/

http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f11/run-flat-tires-72908/
 

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Discussion Starter #6
There have periodically been discussions about run flat tires on this forum.

They cost more, offer a harsher ride, are of limited life - they are good for ONE run flat cycle then need to be replaced in all the literature I have seen.

The consensus is you are much better off carrying a plug repair kit and keeping good conventional tires on the car.


http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f55/run-flat-tires-16408/

http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f43/gxp-tires-run-flats-11759/

http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f11/buy-run-flat-tires-not-60858/

http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f11/run-flat-tires-72908/
all good discussion, and something else I had not thought about.....use of the fix a flat goop and TPMS sensors being messed up. I don't recall the manual saying anything about this, how exactly are the sensors mounted, they are in the rim and perhaps send a signal updating pressures? Aren't these fairly cheap?

I'm just wondering if newer versions of the run flat have been improved with regard to ride, because tirerack has a number of these shown as being OEM on cars like BMW, Mercedes, etc. I still don't like the added cost so I'm leaning toward's a good quality plug repair kit.
 

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all good discussion, and something else I had not thought about.....use of the fix a flat goop and TPMS sensors being messed up. I don't recall the manual saying anything about this, how exactly are the sensors mounted, they are in the rim and perhaps send a signal updating pressures? Aren't these fairly cheap?
Sensors are attached/part-of the valve stem. No, not cheap - something like $60+ each at GM parts prices.

I'm just wondering if newer versions of the run flat have been improved with regard to ride, because tirerack has a number of these shown as being OEM on cars like BMW, Mercedes, etc. I still don't like the added cost so I'm leaning toward's a good quality plug repair kit.
Again...
Everything I've seen about run flats says they are heavy and harsh riding. Certainly the car mags always denigrate them whenever they test a car that has them standard.
 

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I did read reviews that they give a stiffer ride. The Michelins are supposed to be one of the smoother ones, and they all state that due to the way the sidewall is made they actually grip and handle very well, though I never mentioned the track, won't be going there. I'm mainly trying to decide whether the greatly added expense and stiffer ride would be worth the added security of being able to drive the vehicle up to 50 miles if there was a complete flat. Or if maybe the stock little compressor and can of fix a flat (and perhaps a plug repair kit) would work to get us home as well. :thumbs:
I re read your post and I don't know where I got the Track remark either..:willy:Sorry about that..
Another reason I went to run flats is that our kids live on the East and West Coast. So when I go visit by myself I take the Solstice and don't want a tire problem on the trip. As stated by others. They are one time flats if you continue to drive on them. I am not sure about if you stop and fix them just like you would do a regular tire.
 

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The tire goop will require replacement of the sending unit. It is built into the valve stem now. The price TS quoted is a good one I have paid $80 each for them. Plus the price for installation, demounting, mounting and balancing

I looked hard at run flats too. But in the last 100,000 miles in my vehicles I have had no flats. I have the plug kit for $7 and the pump.
 

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Regarding the tire goop in the stock fix-it kit: mine was past the expiry date, so ordered a new one through my local GM dealer in August. After picking it up and paying for it, I noted that it had an expiry date of June 2013 barely 10 months! I complained and the dealer promised to check with GM. They informed him that what I got was all that they had and that they will not be ordering new stock until the current supply is exhausted! WOW! Anyone else with a similar experience? Maybe this applies only to GM Canada.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Regarding the tire goop in the stock fix-it kit: mine was past the expiry date, so ordered a new one through my local GM dealer in August. After picking it up and paying for it, I noted that it had an expiry date of June 2013 barely 10 months! I complained and the dealer promised to check with GM. They informed him that what I got was all that they had and that they will not be ordering new stock until the current supply is exhausted! WOW! Anyone else with a similar experience? Maybe this applies only to GM Canada.
yea butttt... maybe they are doing us a favor. Use that as a last alternative if the darn sensor is going to be $60-80. The advice of getting a flat plug fix kit of decent quality makes total sense. I did read in the manual where you can use the little compressor in the back with the goop going in, or flipping a switch or something and bypassing that so it's just air (once you plug your hole, assuming it's not a sidewall puncture, which is unlikely to be fixed by a plug unless it's very minor).
 
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