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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was about to post these numbers in the MSM/Solstice review thread where slalom numbers were being reported on several vehicles, then it hits me, these numbers weren't close to the same there I guess it's a matter of standards in slalom measurment. Anyone care to inform on how these numbers work, and why the numbers I have here don't match those other numbers?

MSM/Solstice review thread

From Autoweek:
Autoweek (8/30/04) raves: "At 48.4 mph through the slalom, the MAZDASPEED MX-5 Miata ranks second only to the Dodge Vipor SRT-10, at 49 mph, among all the cars we've tested."
 

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I thought there was a standard slalom course that most manufacturers agreed to use, but I can't find any information on the spacing and offset for the cones. Maybe there isn't a standard. I realize anybody can place cones 100-feet apart in a straight line and call it a slalom and test cars, but I thought there was a standard cone spacing and offset that had been agreed to.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The numbers from that other thread:

The Cadillac CTS-V weighs 3900 lbs - 67 mph slalom speed
The Chrysler 300C SRT-8 4200 lbs - at 67.3 mph in the slalom.
The Elise at under 2000 lbs - slalom at 72.6
 

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Slalom is not just around in a circle but the ability to traverse a course around cones constantly changing direction AND speed. Usually a slolom is measured both elapsed time and average speed. Lateral g's are measured on a circular skidpad and is max before tires break loose. Each and every mag has their own size and shape alalom and their own size skid pad, there are no industry standards for test procedures. Therefore you can't compare an Autoweek test of a Miata to a MotorTrend test of a Solstice. And actually we don't know for sure if the .9g for the Sol comes from corporate testing or from data generated by one of the mags on the test mules.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
achieftain said:
Slalom is not just around in a circle but the ability to traverse a course around cones constantly changing direction AND speed. Usually a slolom is measured both elapsed time and average speed. Lateral g's are measured on a circular skidpad and is max before tires break loose. Each and every mag has their own size and shape alalom and their own size skid pad, there are no industry standards for test procedures. Therefore you can't compare an Autoweek test of a Miata to a MotorTrend test of a Solstice. And actually we don't know for sure if the .9g for the Sol comes from corporate testing or from data generated by one of the mags on the test mules.
Intersting, the other thread I posted has the 3 cars being discussed by slalom time, so either we assume the numbers are form the same test, or we should ask to have that made clear by the persons posting the data?
 

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Autoweek = 490 ft slalom / 200 ft skidpad
Car&Driver = 300 ft skidpad
Road&Track = 700 ft Slalom / 200 ft skidpad

Another mag is 600 ft slalom IIRC

Then there is the number of cones in that slalom distance.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
LBJay said:
Autoweek = 490 ft slalom / 200 ft skidpad
Car&Driver = 300 ft skidpad
Road&Track = 700 ft Slalom / 200 ft skidpad

Another mag is 600 ft slalom IIRC
:thumbs:

So, there is a standard within each magazine? That holds from year to year?

I learn so much here, thanks all!
 

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RODEO said:
So, there is a standard within each magazine? That holds from year to year?
Well sort of.... Imagine the difference between a car tested in January and one in July. Then if they used different drivers....


 

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It's buried in this posting (which has not been updated in a LONG time)
http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/showpost.php?p=3230&postcount=2

These were estimations from PM discussions way back when nearly a year ago:

slalom estimations said:
700 ft slalom speed (R&T) | 65-70 mph (based on S2000/Miata capability)
600 ft slalom speed (MT) | 65-70 mph (based on S2000 capability)
7 cone 490 ft slalom (AW) | 47.0 mph (based on S2000 capability)
Figure 8 test (MT) time @ avg. g | 26 sec @ 0.70 g (estimate from S2000)
The 600 footer is MotorTrend's.

Edmunds uses the 700 foot (100 foot spacing), IIRC.
 

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So, only slalom data created by the same people, on the same course and during the same conditions is really of any value for comparison sake. Cross comparison between various media publications seems a mistake.
 

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AeroDave said:
So, only slalom data created by the same people, on the same course and during the same conditions is really of any value for comparison sake. Cross comparison between various media publications seems a mistake.
You are exactly right. The slalom seems to be the test with the most variation (though skidpad can vary by 0.03 g or so also, but it tends to be more repeatable if you have consistent surfaces). IMHO, any car that does above 65MPH consistently in a 100-ft spaced slalom is pretty darn good.
 

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solsticeman said:
You are exactly right. The slalom seems to be the test with the most variation (though skidpad can vary by 0.03 g or so also, but it tends to be more repeatable if you have consistent surfaces). IMHO, any car that does above 65MPH consistently in a 100-ft spaced slalom is pretty darn good.
The slalom speed will be most dependent within a single mag's test procedure on the driver. How close to the cones the driver dares and whether a mag allows touching of the cone if it does not end upset - as in skiing, where you can crash the gates and still not foul. Air and road temps will also affect outcomes dramatically, as will the amount of hidden prep that the engineers do to the test subject before handing it over. Or don't they 'tweak' anymore, following the example set by Nextel NASCAR where nobody gets caught anymore bending the rules...
 

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achieftain said:
Or don't they 'tweak' anymore, following the example set by Nextel NASCAR where nobody gets caught anymore bending the rules...
You mean like sending over a test car with shaved tires....... Naaaa, never happens. :rolleyes:
 

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LBJay said:
You mean like sending over a test car with shaved tires....... Naaaa, never happens. :rolleyes:
Or 1967 head to head test of Pontiac GTO and Ferrari GTO. Ferrari declined to show so they used the slowest published times and the Pontiac was clearly as compared to production models 'tweakes'
 
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