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I just saw a commercial for Slime, which looks like a pretty good product for fixing a flat. Has anyone used this product? Can we expect whatever fix-a-flat-like product that comes with the Solstice to be better, worse, or very similar to Slime? Looks like Slime is a premium product but I didn't do too much research beyond their website... http://www.slime.com.
 

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Don't use "fix-a-flat"!

The junk that comes in the fix-a-flat labeled can will cause you more headaches than help. Most shops will not work on a tire that has had fix-a-flat in it...and you better let them know BEFORE they crack it open to patch a tire...that stuff is flammable.

Tire slime and the other "liquids" are fine...they don't have the propellants in them that fix-a-flat does. Granted, you will have to air the tire up...but really...how often have you seen fix-a-flat actually air up a tire.
 

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Patch Kit

There are also actual tire repair kits, which cost all of $5. It comes with two tools, a tube of rubber cement, and about 5-6 patch cords. It is very fast and Easy, and it can fit in a small bag.

The one tool is like a an ice-pick and file combined. You use it to scoure the hole real fast. Then thread one of the patch cords onto the other tool and put a dab of rubber cement on the end of the tool and the hole. You push the tool in till about a 1/4 inch of the patch cord is sticking out, then remove the tool. Snip the end of the cord thats still exposed with a pair of scissors and your done.

I can do the whole process and have my tire reinflating in less than 10-minutes.

I know what your gonna say and the answer is YES. The only problem is you have to remove the tire. Which means you need to throw a small jack in the trunk, and a small air pump. But it sure beats the alternative. And you don't have to worry about gunking up the inside of your tire with all of those chemicals.

It also works for at home, in the driveway use, of course. I wouldn't use anything else if the flat could wait till i got home or to a gas station. Those cans of goo are more trouble than they are worth.
 

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I have use "Fix-A-Flat" by brand and others. The branded stuff is the best of this type and comes in handy especially for offroad tires. If the tire is just flat or low and not broken bead then this stuff and whatever brand Pontiac is placing in th etrunk will save replacement of a tire and worse an expensive rim. Don't drive at all on a flat even if the tire is junk 'cause you will ruin the wheel. Even steel wheels today don't seem to be the same quailty as wheels from long ago. I have had high-speed flats on 4500# cars from the 60's and 70's and not had to replace the rims. Had flats on 2500# cars of the 90's and the wheels have all but self destructed when the tire blew, not much metal on the lip and this surprises me because I was always taught that you should not put modern radial tires on old 50's rims as they are not strong enough to hold the radial tire on the wheel and now I don't think these cheap wheels would hold the bead on a bias-ply. Maybe it was just the design relief of the lip that was of concern but that doesn't account for the manner in which modern stamped steel oem wheels self-destruct.
 

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Liam1694u said:
There are also actual tire repair kits, which cost all of $5. It comes with two tools, a tube of rubber cement, and about 5-6 patch cords. It is very fast and Easy, and it can fit in a small bag.

The one tool is like a an ice-pick and file combined. You use it to scoure the hole real fast. Then thread one of the patch cords onto the other tool and put a dab of rubber cement on the end of the tool and the hole. You push the tool in till about a 1/4 inch of the patch cord is sticking out, then remove the tool. Snip the end of the cord thats still exposed with a pair of scissors and your done.

I can do the whole process and have my tire reinflating in less than 10-minutes.

I know what your gonna say and the answer is YES. The only problem is you have to remove the tire. Which means you need to throw a small jack in the trunk, and a small air pump. But it sure beats the alternative. And you don't have to worry about gunking up the inside of your tire with all of those chemicals.

It also works for at home, in the driveway use, of course. I wouldn't use anything else if the flat could wait till i got home or to a gas station. Those cans of goo are more trouble than they are worth.
I use what you describe as well with much success and if you can get aligned with underside of car you may not have to remove tire. However you need an inflation device which Pontiac has not provided onboard with the self-leveling rear shocks (they left them out too). For about $30 or less you can get a combination air compressor, flashlight, safety beacon with batteries and/or 12v adapter to provide yourself with enough air capacity to fill tires, beachballs, balloons, etc.
 

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Liam1694u said:
There are also actual tire repair kits, which cost all of $5. It comes with two tools, a tube of rubber cement, and about 5-6 patch cords. It is very fast and Easy, and it can fit in a small bag.

The one tool is like a an ice-pick and file combined. You use it to scoure the hole real fast. Then thread one of the patch cords onto the other tool and put a dab of rubber cement on the end of the tool and the hole. You push the tool in till about a 1/4 inch of the patch cord is sticking out, then remove the tool. Snip the end of the cord thats still exposed with a pair of scissors and your done.

I can do the whole process and have my tire reinflating in less than 10-minutes.

I know what your gonna say and the answer is YES. The only problem is you have to remove the tire. Which means you need to throw a small jack in the trunk, and a small air pump. But it sure beats the alternative. And you don't have to worry about gunking up the inside of your tire with all of those chemicals.

It also works for at home, in the driveway use, of course. I wouldn't use anything else if the flat could wait till i got home or to a gas station. Those cans of goo are more trouble than they are worth.
Only problem - these only handle punctures in the tread, much like the tire gunk. If you cut the sidewall of the tire, gunk or the patch kit will not work. It can't be done on the sidewall cuts I've seen.

achieftain said:
... However you need an inflation device which Pontiac has not provided onboard with the self-leveling rear shocks (they left them out too). For about $30 or less you can get a combination air compressor, flashlight, safety beacon with batteries and/or 12v adapter to provide yourself with enough air capacity to fill tires, beachballs, balloons, etc.
Not true - the Solstice inflator kit is a combined compressor that can be used alone or to pump in the INCLUDED fix a flat canister AND a built in tire gage, operating off the 12V adaptor. It even has a beachball adaptor.
 

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solsticeman said:
It even has a beachball adaptor.
If someone wasn't sold on buying a Solstice before, I don't know what's stopping them now. :D
 

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brentil said:
If someone wasn't sold on buying a Solstice before, I don't know what's stopping them now. :D
I think they just went over 10,000 orders now that the beachball secret is out ;)
 

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slime

I have used slime in my lawn tractor tires and it works well., but it takes like 16 ounces of slime to fill the tire and although it doesn't matter in my mower, that weight could be bad news in a car. It stays liquid (jelly) so when you do get a puncture it goos out and hardens when it gets air. There are no propellants to explode or anything that will harm the ozone layer. but because of the risk of wheel ballance issues, use it in your mower, your bike and your wheel barrow but not your car.
 

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Run_Flat Tires

Hey, if a Corvette can come with run-flat tires, why can't the Solstice? How much more $$$ would that cost?
 

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CalBear said:
Hey, if a Corvette can come with run-flat tires, why can't the Solstice? How much more $$$ would that cost?
You can but the ride of runflats is more harsh than regular tires. It's a trade off.
 

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CalBear said:
Hey, if a Corvette can come with run-flat tires, why can't the Solstice? How much more $$$ would that cost?
You sure about the Corvette having run-flats?

Chevy.com lists them as follows;
Tires, front P245/40ZR-18, Extended Mobility, Eagle F1
Tires, rear P285/35ZR-19, Extended Mobility, Eagle F1
I looked it up, that's what Extended Mobility means. :D
The Goodyear Eagle F1-GS EMT extended mobility tire is a high performance tire with a remarkable extra feature: if needed it can operate for limited distances at very low or zero inflation pressure. So even with a total loss of air pressure, the Eagle F1-GS EMT lets you continue driving until you can reach an EMT service facility and secure proper maintenance.
 

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Does anyone know if the fix-a-flat supplied in the Sol is the liquid type (like Slime) or the propellants type? I assume since we get an inflator it's the liquid type.
 

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Liam1694u said:
There are also actual tire repair kits...I know what your gonna say and the answer is YES. The only problem is you have to remove the tire.
You only need to remove the tire if you can't find the leak. I patched a hole on my truck just a week ago (sheet metal screw). I have also used a number of different brands of fix-a-flat, doesn't always work - but I've never had a problem (just let the service guys know if they have to work on a filled tire).
 

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mceb said:
Does anyone know if the fix-a-flat supplied in the Sol is the liquid type (like Slime) or the propellants type? I assume since we get an inflator it's the liquid type.
Liquid type - I believe it's latex-based, so if you have latex allergies, be aware.

There is a cannister that attaches to the inflator. The inflator has a typical quick-release hose from the compressor. You can use it directly, or you hook it to a valve with another hose that is a screw-on type. Turning on the compressor in this configuration pops the seal on the liquid sealant, pumps the sealant into the tire, and continues to inflate the tire.

MAKE SURE YOU HAVE ATTACHED THE SCREW-ON HOSE BEFORE YOU TURN ON THE PUMP, OR YOU HAVE A MELL OF A HESS!!!

Long term storage of temperature-sensitive flammable propellant pressurized cannister that has the potential for rusting is prolly not a smart thing for an OEM.
 

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sidewall tear

As far as I know, and I may be wrong, but if you get a tear in your sidewall the only fix is a new tire. No slime or patchkit or fix-a-flat can fix a sidewall tear.

Like I said, I may be wrong, but I've had a few myself, and the only solution was to replace the tire. It's a "physics thing".
 

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waiting said:
...but because of the risk of wheel ballance issues, use it in your mower, your bike and your wheel barrow but not your car.
I dunno...you ought to see how fast I can run with my wheelbarrow... :lol:
 

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Liam1694u said:
As far as I know, and I may be wrong, but if you get a tear in your sidewall the only fix is a new tire. No slime or patchkit or fix-a-flat can fix a sidewall tear.

Like I said, I may be wrong, but I've had a few myself, and the only solution was to replace the tire. It's a "physics thing".
Yup. That is pretty much accurate. Sidewall tears damage a critical part of the tire - namely the connecting radial cords, which are key to... well... keeping the tread as part of the tire assembly :lol:
 
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