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Seems like I've seen several mentions of the SOL sliding and hydroplaning when on a wet road. Some of these were from reviewers who didn't like the car so they may have been looking for flaws. I'm just wondering what the owners who have done some serious driving think.?
 

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When I bought my car, I drove hit home from Ohio to Virginia and it rained the whole time. The car handled solidly the entire time.

However, I have experienced sliding on wet pavement (one very close call) but attribute this to the amount of tire dressing I had on my wheels at the time...
 

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wannasolstice2 said:
When I bought my car, I drove hit home from Ohio to Virginia and it rained the whole time. The car handled solidly the entire time.

However, I have experienced sliding on wet pavement (one very close call) but attribute this to the amount of tire dressing I had on my wheels at the time...

The dressing goes on the outside of the tire not he tread......duh! :willy:
 

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This post from the thread rodeo posted says it all (not just because it's s-man and he's the king mod :lol: )

http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/showpost.php?p=113494&postcount=32

RS-A is good all around/all season tire. There are better tires for incredible wet handling like F1 but you have to give up something like no snow.

Could also slow down in the rain, that works too ;)
 

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dferkler said:
The dressing goes on the outside of the tire not he tread......duh! :willy:
Duh...I know...however, the application I had used required me to spray it on and I apparently oversprayed it and inadvertently covered the tread...

My value here is to warn others of this so to avoid others having to experience this near mishap.
 

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I definitely wouldn't say the Sol handles bad on wet roads, but it's just that you get so used to the tremendous stick that the car has on dry roads that the driver can tend to become complacent and assume that it's always that way. It's just something to be aware of so that you don't try to push it to the limits as much in wet weather until you get a feel for how it handles. I've had a couple of slippery experiences, but still found the car comes back into line pretty easily with a bit of correction as long as you don't go so fast that you send it into a spin.
 

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Rain? What's rain? Why would the roads be wet? :D
 

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I have not driven the car in the rain.

For starters, tires need break in as well. It takes about 40 to 60 miles minimum to removed the slicker surface and get down to the inner rubber. That's not much time at all. But if you drive your Sol home, garage it, and your next drive is in the rain, then guess what? Your tires are not broken in yet.

Next point, cars with little body lean tend to feel like they are deceptively slowly. So when you are taking turns at a fairly high speed, it may not feel like it compared with that SUV you've been driving. As a result, you don't think you are moving that fast, when in fact you are flying around the corners, and have become spoiled by the dry traction the fat tires produce - so when they come back to earth in the rain -- SLOW DOWN!

And finally, if you live in Portland, Oregon and you need great wet weather traction, then you should be looking for wet weather tires when it comes time to replace. Which will be quite soon as sports car burn up rubber twice as fast as regular cars and trucks do.

I would love folks to answer your question, if there are any inherent problems with wet weather traction in the Solstice? Because no reviewers thought that was a worthy enough issue to bring up.
 

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A few thoughts on wet weather traction. Tire Compound and design has more impact on wet weather handling that car design does. Ever see a Goodyear Aqua Track ?? The problem with a road with standing water is getting the water out from between the tire and the road. The tread design, the grooves and sipes all contribute to this. The more area you can give the water to get out the better the tire will be in the wet. This unfortunately is the opposite of what you want for Dry weather traction, big uninterrupted blocks of rubber that won't squirm or deform when placed under cornering loads. Obviousely the tire manufacturers have a lot of compromises to make when they design a tire and they can use that focus to direct consumer interest the Aqua Track being a good example. The Solstice is a relatively light car with big fat tires so getting the water out from under is gonna take some doing and careful tire selection. Right now the tire I think will work for me is the AVON M550 A/S an all season tire with performance aspitation but coming from good ole England where your tires better be good on a wet road. ALso very reasonably priced . Those of you with the LSD remember when one tire loses traction on a wet road they both do. LSD cars are noted for the rear end coming around in low traction situations. With a conventional differential when the drive tire spins the non drive stay connected, with a LSD when the driving power overcome traction both let loose together. Definitely something to watch out for. I'm trying to keep this simple so I'm not going into tread compounds or tire construction but if you live in an area where you'll be in encountering a lot of limited traction situations when its time to replace the tires you can have a big influence on how the car will react. Since your reading this on the internet the major on line tire stores have great data bases of tire with a lot of custmer reviews to help you pick what works in your area. A good tire for Phoenix will be different from an optimal choice in S Florida or Oregon.
 

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z3404 said:
A few thoughts on wet weather traction. Tire Compound and design has more impact on wet weather handling that car design does. Ever see a Goodyear Aqua Track ?? The problem with a road with standing water is getting the water out from between the tire and the road. The tread design, the grooves and sipes all contribute to this. The more area you can give the water to get out the better the tire will be in the wet. This unfortunately is the opposite of what you want for Dry weather traction, big uninterrupted blocks of rubber that won't squirm or deform when placed under cornering loads. Obviousely the tire manufacturers have a lot of compromises to make when they design a tire and they can use that focus to direct consumer interest the Aqua Track being a good example. The Solstice is a relatively light car with big fat tires so getting the water out from under is gonna take some doing and careful tire selection. Right now the tire I think will work for me is the AVON M550 A/S an all season tire with performance aspitation but coming from good ole England where your tires better be good on a wet road. ALso very reasonably priced . Those of you with the LSD remember when one tire loses traction on a wet road they both do. LSD cars are noted for the rear end coming around in low traction situations. With a conventional differential when the drive tire spins the non drive stay connected, with a LSD when the driving power overcome traction both let loose together. Definitely something to watch out for. I'm trying to keep this simple so I'm not going into tread compounds or tire construction but if you live in an area where you'll be in encountering a lot of limited traction situations when its time to replace the tires you can have a big influence on how the car will react. Since your reading this on the internet the major on line tire stores have great data bases of tire with a lot of custmer reviews to help you pick what works in your area. A good tire for Phoenix will be different from an optimal choice in S Florida or Oregon.
Regarding a lsd- you got the explanation backwards. The reason an lsd will go sideways when one side loses traction and the other keeps it's traction is because the tire that keeps traction will tend to kick the car around. On a non lsd rear end, one tire spins, the other does nothing, and you go nowhere until you get some traction. The most extreme example I've seen was at a drag race at Gainsville a T bucket launched off the line, got out about 60 feet, broke an axle on one side, and imediately hooked 90 degrees left and head on into the concrete wall.
 

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Not to beat this to death but when your attempting to accelerate on a wet or icy road when you apply power to a LSD when the available traction for both tires is exceeded both wheels will spin therefore losing traction forward or laterally. When applying power with a conventional differential when the tire with the least amount of traction available loses traction that tire will spin. The other tire will continue to roll maybe not supply any forward velocity but still providing lateral traction. Best example of this i can give in a pickup truck . When trying to accelerate on a wet or icy road with a conventonal differental give it too much gas and it will spin the wheel with the least amount of traction. Give it too much gas with a LSD and the rear end will try and swap ends with you as both tires spin at the same time. This is something I learned very vividly when I installed a LSD on my pickup truck a few years ago. Point I'ld like to get across to anyone reading this with a LSD be careful when gassing it on a wet road If you give it too much gas and lose traction the rear end will come out very abruptly so pay attention and watch out for it. The plus side of the LSD is when there is minimal traction you can still move forward instead of just spinning one wheel.
 

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z3404: I presume that applies even to dry roads. I took a sharp right turn in second, punched the gas, and backend swung over to the left so quick, had to get off the gas. But it was fun!

.
 

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"SLIPPERY WHEN WET" I thought the signs where warnings.(?) But my dad having a lot of knowledge of Indian Lore and said "SLIPPERY WHEN WET" was the wife of "FALLING ROCK".
 

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ARKTEK said:
"SLIPPERY WHEN WET" I thought the signs where warnings.(?) But my dad having a lot of knowledge of Indian Lore and said "SLIPPERY WHEN WET" was the wife of "FALLING ROCK".
Yeah, I was born under the sign of Aries.

But I was conceived under the sign "Keep Off The Grass."

Fortimir, looks like steak for dinner! :)

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