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I have to admit that I have not read every thread on the Forum, so this may be out there...

Last weekend I went out to cut the grass on some property we own and the mower had two flat tires.

Light bulb went off that since I was in the Solstice I could just use the pump that has been in the trunk and not moved since I bought the car. Saved me a trip back home with the trailer to get the big compressor.

First off the pump worked great to get the mower going.

Second as the pump was working I looked at the attached fix-a-flat canister and noticed it had an expiration or use-by date. Since I have a 2009 Coupe I have one of the later models so should have the newest pump... The expiration date was April 2013, not sure if that is just recommended or if that means the stuff magically turns to sludge, but thought it was worth passing on for others to check.

Not a big deal for me since i never plan to pump the gunk in my tires, but someone may be stuck in a place and need it. So I would recommend that you all take a look and see if yours is expired too and then do your own risk assessment if you want to update that small canister or rely on a flat-bed wrecker when you have a flat on the road.
 

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lol - it's a great point, but I'd never use the stuff anyway.

A few years back we discovered a flat on our travel trailer as we were leaving the park on a Sunday. Drove to an auto parts store about 15 miles away and bought a fix a flat "kit" with a 12v compressor. (We were only about 35 miles from home so I figured I'd be able to get there using a "crutch".) Pumped the gunk, went to plug in the "inflator" (guess it isn't really a compressor) and found that the plug was completely apart and broken (in the packaging.) Drove back in a hurry (place closed at 1) and got the 2nd and last "kit" on the shelf, opened it, and yep - it was fubar just like the first one. Asked him "Do you have an inflator that ISN'T Chinese sh!t?" He replied no, but did give me a separate inflator (more expensive) in exchange.
 

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Fix-a-flat will only fix a small puncture, and will inhibit or prevent the tire from being repaired by a tire shop. A puncture that can't be repaired also can't be fixed with fix-a-flat.

So when should you use it? Only in a dire emergency. Like you are out in a desolate area somewhere and would have to walk for miles to find a person. And its below freezing. And you don't know which way leads to civilization. And you're wounded. And wolves are picking off members of your group, one by one. And you find yourself reciting this poem:

Once more into the fray
Into the last good fight I'll ever know
Live and die on this day
Live and die on this day

Only then, should you consider using fix-a-flat.

P.S. I doubt it really expires. It's not a tub of butter sitting on the kitchen counter. Its a synthetic polymer in a sealed, pressurized container. How is it going to "go bad"? If the can has pressure, it will work. The expiration date is the longest they will promise it will work. This is to prevent any liability and to increase sales as people needlessly replace unused old cans.
 

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I went out and bought a few tire plug kits at walmart. got the one with the file and it was about $6ea. Bought 3 of them, as the wifes car doesn't have a spare either. Now if I get a flat, I can plug it and air it up with my pump and be back on the road in no time and it's fixed for good.
Slime Deluxe Reamer Plugger: Automotive : Walmart.com
 

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I went out and bought a few tire plug kits at walmart. got the one with the file and it was about $6ea. Bought 3 of them, as the wifes car doesn't have a spare either. Now if I get a flat, I can plug it and air it up with my pump and be back on the road in no time and it's fixed for good.
Slime Deluxe Reamer Plugger: Automotive : Walmart.com
I really don't think its accurate to say that this goo fixes it for good. They will start to leak again, especially if you do any kind of hard driving. This is really meant to help you limp home if you get a flat in an untenable situation.
 

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You're not reading my post. I don't use the goo. I'd throw that crap away. I said use a tire plug, the same ones they use at the service stations and I've plugged tires and driven on them till they were bald. Slime is the brand name of the kit and it cements the plug in for added results.
 

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If you get a plug kit, spring for a more expensive one with a better quality reamer and inserter and with T handles. The cheap ones break or bend and the inserter difficult to use. (Speaking from experience here)
 

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Good advice as always TS

I also make sure to throw in a pair of pliers so I can get the offending nail out in order to install the patch.

Do not ask me how I figured this out . .. please. . . .:willy::willy::willy:
 

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yeah, I forgot to mention that too. bought 3 pairs of bent needle nose at harbor freight for 2 bucks each. For a while, my wife used to come home with a nail or a screw in a tire on a weekly basis. the sets I bought for the cars are the same I listed above and the handles are nice and tough. the plug tool I have in the garage is the same brand and I've had it for 10 years and have installed about 50 plugs with it. Whenever I do a plug at home, I whip out my cordless drill and use a 1/4 in or so drill bit and use that to ream the hole out. makes it nice and easy but you still have to use some muscle to get the plug in. I always use rubber cement on the plug too. helps it glide in and seals it better too.
 

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P.S. I doubt it really expires. It's not a tub of butter sitting on the kitchen counter. Its a synthetic polymer in a sealed, pressurized container. How is it going to "go bad"? If the can has pressure, it will work. The expiration date is the longest they will promise it will work. This is to prevent any liability and to increase sales as people needlessly replace unused old cans.
Well, mebbe...or mebbe not.

Chemistry is mighty funny stuff; the expiration date may just be to get you to buy a new can -- or there may be some chemical reaction that eventually causes it to go bad. Also, don't forget that it is stored in your trunk and that the temperature there can easily get to 120 or 130 degrees...and heat and chemicals don't necessarily get along.

Having said that, I wouldn't use the stuff unless it was a matter of true and utter desperation.
 

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Well, mebbe...or mebbe not.

Chemistry is mighty funny stuff; the expiration date may just be to get you to buy a new can -- or there may be some chemical reaction that eventually causes it to go bad. Also, don't forget that it is stored in your trunk and that the temperature there can easily get to 120 or 130 degrees...and heat and chemicals don't necessarily get along.

Having said that, I wouldn't use the stuff unless it was a matter of true and utter desperation.
Not a Chem -E here, but have some experience in adhesives over the years in the plastics biz. Without reading the can I'm going to venture that the chemicals are either activated by exposure to atmosphere or moisture (or both.) Since that is limited whilst the goo remains inside the can, it is not eliminated whilst inside the can so there is the likelihood it can react and be useless. Will it happen on or near the expiration date? Hell no - as stated by others above it's a good ploy to get you to toss it and buy more.
 

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Funny this thread came up now. I have never even looked at my pump thingy in the 6 years I've owned my car, up until a week ago. An employee in our parking lot at work had a dead flat tire on his truck. Pretty obvious he wasn't moving without a fix. I noticed this as I turned my key to come home, and so did he, and at once kicked his tire and scratched his head. I remembered the kit in the trunk and offered to give it a try. I really didn't expect it could be fixed by pressurizing, as it was dead flat and looked like it might have separated from the rim. Well darned if it didn't perform like a trooper. - It was fun for me too as it had never even been unstrapped from its home. gave me a chance to try it out, under non-stressful conditions.

No - I didn't even look at the goo, and I do agree - that would require a desperate situation and I'd call AAA first.
 

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I think someone else a while back said they they used their pump and it worked impressivly well. My question is should we periodicly break out the pump and let it fun for a few minutes or is it fine just sitting dormant until the need. I would think that over time it would get rusted or corroded inside and might fail in an emergency sitch. and is there an oil hole or a cover we can remove to apply a little grease? sorry, I have not taken it out and played with it yet:)
 

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You're talking about the air pump, right? ;)

I'm following your logic though. If it has lubricant it stands to reason that running it in order to distribute the lube would be a good thing.
I think these days most of these little crappy air compressors are sealed and use a teflon kinda liner for the little piston. So that means they probably also will last a long time, but repeated use and high temps that come from that kill them quickly. This is a just a little $20 pump for small tires that you could buy anywhere, all made in China.

Having the plug kit (not the goo flix a flat) and the compressor should get the job done.

My converted AC compressor (vehicle motor driven via serpentine belt), with 4 Gal., 150psi pressurized tank, that's a decent pump. Would fill a sol tire in about 15 secs., takes a little over 1 minute for a 100lb., 37" offroad tire. And in the offroad world, spares are king, followed by the plug kits. The fix a flat goo is a complete mess later on when pulling tire from rim, and won't work as mentioned unless the leak is a little one. If you have the TPMS system I think this was covered that the OEM cannister likely won't cause a problem (hmmmmm???), but aftermarket goo likely will, creating more expense.
 

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I bet the ac pump has some power. when we were kids ( about 10 ) my neighbors dad made an air pump out of an old freezer pump. it has a screw on valve attachment and my friend and I put a needle on it and stuck it in an old basketball and turned it on. we hid behind an old shelf about 10ft away and waited. Not 5 minutes later, kaboom! it was awesome. we looked around for minutes trying to find it and ended up finding it inches from where we were hiding. I wish I knew how much pressure it took to pop it but I'm sure it was a lot.
 
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