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Have a 2009 NA, got it last year with under 2000 miles on it, one owner car, now have around 3500. Had the coolant and brake fluid changed. Do I need the spark plugs changed, not because of mileage but age as they are around 7 years old of when car built. It is an auto trans
 

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Have a code reader connected, to see if you are getting misfire records; if so, you may have a weak plug. Otherwise, no, they don't fail from age.
 

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Wow, only thirty five hundred miles. Nice! :thumbs:
Just out of curiosity would pull one to see how it looks.
 

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i would change them . if you start the car and do not run it all the time and it sits and you start it very short drive. this puts a lot on a car and engine spark plugs. worst thing you can do to a car is not drive it . its up to you . if you plan on driving the car then change them they get old gas on them and its more hard to completely ignite the gas in the cylinder . if your just planning on not driving it don't bother . my opinion
 

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As someone else said; spark plugs don't age. And no, old gas doesn't affect their lifespan either. In modern engines, improper mixture, incorrect timing, or oil fowling are the main reasons they need to be replaced sooner than the manufacturer recommendations.
 

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a lot of non mechanics type in here. I type what I know and have seen in my 18 years of experience . I would change those spark plugs in a second if I bought your car to start driving it daily . along with a lot of other items I would change the tires the belts all the fluids . its always good to hear others opinions .
 

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Everyone has their own opinion on things mine based on 50 years of working on things mechanical I guess if someone is really concerned the least they should do is pull the plugs and look at them but again they don't wear out from sitting. I agree with Corey as far as the fluids go ,add a can of fuel system cleaner I prefer Chevron Techron,check the tires as they are to a point where they may need to be replaced because of age ,look for cracks in the tire sidewalls a sign of dry rot ,the hoses and belts should be inspected and the battery should be tested basically a good going over .I'm a firm believer in preventative maintenance and I'm checking and replacing all these items in a Chevelle I just bought even though the car was maintained my Solstice gets a once over and a fresh oil yearly no matter how many miles I put on it "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure "
 

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I believe in preventive maintenance, but there have been vast improvements in cars since the old days. I have a 2002 Dodge pickup with 188k miles. It still has the original belt and hoses on it. Some would say I'm pushing my luck, but we'll see what happens.
 

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I would NOT change the plugs. As said before, spark plugs do not "age" when not in use.

Yogi
 

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Sometimes, just looking at the plugs doesn't help; in my Fiero 2M4, the plugs lasted 2 years, before it started failing the emissions test. They looked fine, but after replacing them, the test passed. Our ECM records misses (which must be what my Fiero was doing), so it is worth a scan to see how many are being recorded, as this is possibly the best indication that the plugs are starting to cause problems.
Tires: check the date code, don't look for cracks; I won't ride on tires over 6 years old, no matter how they look.
Fluids: brake/clutch fluid every two years, and coolant per the owner's manual. Oil, once a year, or when the OLM says less than 20%, which ever comes first.
Don't forget to check the power steering fluid - it ages out, too.
 
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