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PODCAST from Clay Dean on Solstice

This is the "GM Radio" discussion from a few weeks back on the GM Blog. For those newbies it's a 15 minute MP3 broadcast interview with a Solstice program exec.

http://fastlane.gmblogs.com/podcast/solstice_interview.mp3

Note: previous threads (search) have pretty much agreed his 5.4 seconds 0-60 time and 1g skidpad reference was either a mistake or applied to some future high-ouput Solstice that slipped out while discussing the current model.
 

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Kappa Platform Solstice Sky

Question: What is the Kappa Platform? What is the Kappa Architecture?
Answer: [summary compiled from various articles and discussions over the last two years]

The Kappa Platform, or architecture, is a new vehicle architecture developed by General Motors to enable the Pontiac Solstice to become reality as a production car.

A vehicle architecture or platform is the basic underlying, load-bearing structure in a vehicle. Analogous to the framing of a building, it also is the majority of expense in production, design, and validation of a new car. A typical strategy for an automotive company is to develop a new architecture or platform rarely - and use that platform for producing variants or improving successive generations of vehicles.

Regarding the Kappa Platform:

In 2002, the Pontiac Solstice Concept was shown, in two forms: a driveable roadster convertible, and a design study of a fastback coupe.

The Pontiac Solstice was recieved very well at the 2002 NAIAS. The driveable roadster concept car shown had been cobbled together from many different components, using a cobbled portion of the "Delta" architecture (a Front-Wheel-Drive small car architecture that supports the Saturn ION and the Chevy Cobalt). The thinking was that this architecture might be heavily modified and used to produce the Solstice.

We have speculated that when General Motors decided to try to produce the Solstice as a highly-styled, low-cost, low-volume niche vehicle for enthusiasts, it became apparent that there were no existing platforms that could be used to achieve the needs of a modern roadster.

Therefore, the Kappa Platform was developed to provide the necessary structure for a two-seat, Rear Wheel Drive convertible. It features hydroformed rails and a tunnel structure similar to the Corvette architecture, and is designed for a short-long-arm suspension for the front and rear. It features rear wheel drive, longitudinal-mounted transmission and front-mid engine.

At this time it appears the platform has only been designed to accomodate a single engine - the four-cylinder Ecotec family. It also appears this platform was only designed to be "left-hand drive".

Since the Solstice, GM has designed another roadster that looks radically different, but shares the same underlying Kappa Platform: The Saturn Sky. The Saturn Sky was styled after the pattern of the Vauxhall VX Lightning design (see below). It also appears that there will be a European version built off the same platform, the details of which have not been released at this time.

Three other concept vehicles were built off the initial Kappa Platform, and shown at the 2004 NAIAS: The Vauxhall VX Lightning, The Saturn Curve and Chevy Nomad. All three cars were recieved reasonably well, but were not nearly as embraced as the original Solstice Concept.

The Vauxhall VX Lightning is the same size as the original Solstice Concept, and pieced together in the same manner as the 2002 Solstice Concept, and had been shown in Europe several months earlier, before the "Kappa Platform" had apparently been finalized. The Vauxhall VX Lightning is the styling pattern after which the appearance of the Saturn Sky is based.

The Saturn Curve and the Chevy Nomad Concept Cars were built on "modified" versions of the Kappa Platform, and exhibited 12" longer wheelbases, and 2+2 seating.

See also A Look at GM's Kappa RWD Architecture
 

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Low ground clearance versus incline

BadAzSolstice said:
Forgive me for being ignorant, but what is the deal with a 7% versus 5% incline?
Because the body of Solstice is low to the ground, when you approach an inclined ramp from a flat surface, the nose of the vehicle may wind up touching down on the ramp before the tires start climbing the front of the ramp sufficiently to keep the nose from touching, like this:


Similarly, when going over a bump or "kink" where the ramp levels out, you can scrape the center of the car as the front wheels proceed out along the straight part before the rear wheels have lifted the center of the car sufficiently to avoid the "peak" of the ramp. In off roading, this is called "high centering" and it occurs when the curvature at the top of an obstacle is sharper than the ground clearance will permit the vehicle to clear, like this:


To eliminate these problems, you can do 3 things.
  1. you can decrease the "overhangs" on the front and back (the amount the nose and tail protrude past the wheels)
  2. you can decrease the wheel base (bring the front and back wheels closer together)
  3. you can increase the distance from the bottom of the vehicle to the ground by raising the suspension and increasing the height of the tires.

Doing the first (decreasing the overhangs) has some advantages, but the second (shortening the wheel base) can reduce high speed stability. The third (raising the suspension and increasing the height of the tires) has two negative effects:
  1. Increasing the height of the center of gravity and changing the roll center of the vehicle
  2. Increasing the amount of air that goes under the car thereby increasing rolling resistance through increased drag.

The advice to be careful about speed bumps is well taken, because even if the speed bump is only 3 inches tall, you must gently lower the front and rear wheels down from on top of the bump to avoid the jounce and concomitant suspension compression which will actually cause the car to spring lower on it's suspension and potentially bounce down onto the speed bump.

For inclines, this also matters for a driveway: If the driveway apron is very steep, and fairly short, you can wind up scraping the nose, and the underside between the wheels as you drive into the driveway. The same holds true for parking lot entrances, so caution will be well advised for transitions from the street up driveway aprons and back again.

Hope this helped a bit.
 

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Press Release : 2003 Vauxhall VX Lightning Concept

http://vauxhall.co.uk/companyInformation/newsPage.jhtml?indexNo=720
13/05/03 [May 13, 2003]

Vauxhall Lightning - our first concept car for 25 years.
LIGHTNING STRIKES AS CENTENARY CONCEPT DEMONSTRATES VAUXHALL RENAISSANCE

LIGHTNING STRIKES AS CENTENARY CONCEPT DEMONSTRATES VAUXHALL RENAISSANCE

"Keep it simple, pure, and beautiful." The words of GM vice president Bob Lutz when launching the Solstice concept in the US.

This was the basic requirement for Vauxhall's stunning new concept car, the VX Lightning.

Being launched as a centrepiece to the company's Centenary celebrations, the VX Lightning is a two-seater roadster based on the same technical foundation as the Pontiac concept Solstice, first seen at the 2002 North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

Vauxhall's roadster concept, however, has been designed for British tastes, at GM's UK Advanced Design Studio in the Midlands.

Under the long bonnet of the VX Lightning is a new version of Vauxhall's all aluminium 2.2 ECOTEC engine, reworked with a supercharger to produce a maximum power of 240hp and 305Nm of torque.

A six-speed manual gearbox is mated to the new engine, which drives the rear wheels. The chassis incorporates independent suspension, the front end using a simple and reliable strut configuration with a rack and pinion steering.

At the rear, the independent suspension is all aluminium for weight saving. Overall, the car manages a near perfect 50:50 weight distribution for the best in handling and agility.

Kevin Wale, Vauxhall chairman and managing director says: "The VX Lightning says everything about where Vauxhall is heading. The car represents a return to our early performance roots when Vauxhall was famous as the manufacturer of the first true British sports car - while we continue to be both innovative and bold in exterior and interior design. "We have made great strides recently in terms of our interior packaging through cars like Zafira and Signum. Vauxhall is also about pure driving excitement - just look at the new VX220 Turbo.

"Ultimately the VX Lightning, as a classic roadster, represents the best of our past, and our future - a vehicle that is quintessentially British."

DesignDesigned in the UK, the VX Lightning is a classically proportioned sports car with a long bonnet and short rear overhang.

There are also some subtle echoes of the past, including the rollover hoops sculptured into the rear deck and bodywork which flows down into the cabin.

Fitting for a car with the presence of the VX Lightning, it sits on 19inch alloy wheels at the front (fitted with 245/35 Michelin Pilot tyres) while at the rear massive 20 inch alloys are fitted with 255/35 tyres.

Inside, deeply sculptured seats are finished in black and red leather, while red leather has also been used to trim the sweeping dashboard.

There are currently no plans to build the VX Lightning concept, however Vauxhall will be closely monitoring public reaction to this great new car

33257/SH120503

VX Lightning - technical specifications

Body/chassis structure: unique GM platform, based on the Solstice, with front engine and rear-wheel driveBody material: compositeChassis material: all steel, unibody Suspension: 4-wheel independent, strut front, adjustable for rate and travel Wheels: machined aluminiumFront: 19 x 8.5 inRear 20 x 9 in Tyres: front - Michelin Pilot 245/35R19Rear - Michelin Pilot 255/35R20

BrakesDiscs all-round

Powertrain

Engine: modified, supercharged ECOTEC L850 2.2L 4-cylinderEngine displacement (cu. in/cc):134/2200Max. horsepower (hp/kW):240/179Max. torque (lb.ft/Nm):225/305

TransmissionGM T56, six-speed manual (5th/6th gears overdrive).

Dimensions

Height (in/mm):45.0/1140Length (in/mm):153.1/4100Width (in/mm):71/1808 (1908mm inc. mirrors)Wheelbase (in/mm): 95/2415Track (in/mm):front -60.3/1532

rear - 60.5/1537Weight (lbs/kg):2900/1318


http://vauxhall.co.uk/futureModels/VXLightning.jhtml

The VX Lightning is a two-seater roadster based on the same technical foundation as the Pontiac concept Solstice, first seen at the 2002 North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Vauxhall's roadster concept, however, has been designed for British tastes, at GM's UK Advanced Design Studio in the Midlands.

Under the long bonnet of the VX Lightning is a new version of Vauxhall's all aluminium 2.2 ECOTEC engine, reworked with a supercharger to produce a maximum power of 240hp and 305Nm of torque.

A six-speed manual gearbox is mated to the new engine, which drives the rear wheels. The chassis incorporates independent suspension, the front end using a simple and reliable strut configuration with a rack and pinion steering.

At the rear, the independent suspension is all aluminium for weight saving. Overall, the car manages a near perfect 50:50 weight distribution for the best in handling and agility.

Designed in the UK, the VX Lightning is a classically proportioned sports car with a long bonnet and short rear overhang. There are also some subtle echoes of the past, including the rollover hoops sculptured into the rear deck and bodywork which flows down into the cabin. Inside, deeply sculptured seats are finished in black and red leather, while red leather has also been used to trim the sweeping dashboard.

Fitting for a car with the presence of the VX Lightning, it sits on 19inch alloy wheels at the front (fitted with 245/35 Michelin Pilot tyres) while at the rear massive 20-inch alloys are fitted with 255/35 tyres.

There are currently no plans to build the VX Lightning concept, however we will be closely monitoring public reaction to this great new car.

Read the press release

VX Lightning - Technical Specifications

Body/chassis structure Unique GM platform, based on the Solstice, with front engine and rear-wheel drive.
Body material Composite
Chassis material All steel, unibody
Suspension 4-wheel independent, strut front, adjustable for rate and travel
Wheels Machined aluminium
Front - 19 x 8.5 in.
Rear - 20 x 9 in.
Tyres Front - Michelin Pilot 245/35R19
Rear - Michelin Pilot 255/35R20
Brakes 4-wheel disc power
Powertrain Engine - modified, supercharged EcoTec L850 2.2L 4-cylinder
Engine displacement (cu. in/cc) - 134/2200
Max. Horsepower (hp/kw): 240/179
Max. Torque (lb-ft/Nm): 225/305
Transmission GM T56, six-speed manual (5th/6th gears overdrive).
Dimensions Height (in/mm) - 45.0/1140
Length (in/mm) - 153.1/4100
Width (in/mm) - 71/1808 (1908mm inc. mirrors)
Wheelbase (in/mm) - 95/2415
Track (in/mm) - front - 60.3/15, rear - 60.5/1537
Weight (lbs/kg) - 2900/1318
 

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Solstice Rear Caster



The Pontiac Solstice enjoys the distinction of being the first GM vehicle to have adjustable rear caster (fig. 1). It will soon be joined by the Saturn SKY.


A procedure has been developed to measure rear wheel caster, using a new Digital Angle Gauge. But first, a little detail on rear caster.

Rear Caster

Rear caster adjustment is used on the Solstice and SKY to insure rear ride steer (bump steer) is within specification. Ride steer is toe change during vertical wheel travel.

On a front suspension, it’s common to check caster by doing a “caster sweep,” in which the wheels are steered through an angle, and the caster angle is indicated. Because the rear wheels don’t have steering gear, a caster sweep is not possible. So a direct measurement is necessary.

Digital Angle Gauge

A new Digital Angle Gauge CH-47960 (fig. 2) has been released by SPX Kent-Moore. It will be essential for all Pontiac and Saturn dealers.


Instructions for use are supplied with the gauge. Here are some highlights.

The gauge consists of three parts: a battery powered control unit, a sensor, and a connecting cable.

The control unit provides simple input buttons:

- to specify the side of the vehicle being checked (driver or passenger)

- to zero the instrument.

- to specify offset

There are two locating pins on the back of the sensor (fig. 3). They can be adjusted up and down by twisting to loosen and tighten.


The pins are inserted into two manufacturing gauge holes in the rear wheel knuckle (fig. 4).


Measuring Tips

Before using the gauge, it must be zeroed to the alignment rack (fig. 5). This is accomplished simply by placing the sensor on the rack and pressing the zero button. Zeroing accounts for variations in the levelness of individual alignment racks, so it’s never a concern. You don’t have to do any math or make allowances.


TIP: Be sure both the bottom of the sensor and the surface of the alignment rack are free of debris, to avoid an inaccurate zero.

Before installing the sensor to the knuckle, use a soft (nylon) bristle brush to clean debris from the gauge holes. Do not use power tools or abrasives.

Use the appropriate pushbutton on the control unit to indicate which side of the vehicle you’re working on, either driver or passenger.

A vertical line drawn through the gauge holes in the knuckle (B) is not quite perpendicular to the axis between the two balljoints (A). So you need to locate the specification of that angle and input it into the tool. This is called the offset (fig. 6), and in the case of the Solstice rear wheels, it’s +3.7°.


Finally, take the caster reading (the specification is -4° +/- 0.5°). By specifying the offset angle earlier, you set up the gauge so the readout indicates the actual caster angle (fig. 7). You don’t have to do any math.


TIP: If you study the front and rear suspension of the Solstice, you may notice that the driver front knuckle resembles the passenger rear knuckle, and the passenger front and driver rear knuckles resemble each other. This suggests that you could use the gauge to check front caster. This would require inputting “driver” into the Digital Angle Gauge when working on the passenger side, and vice versa. Don’t be tempted to do this, however, because the front offset angle is different from the rear, and this specification has not been published.

Alignment Tips

TIP: It’s important to complete the rear wheel alignment before aligning the front end.

IMPORTANT: If you do not have Digital Angle Gauge CH-47960, do not attempt to adjust rear caster. In this case, set only rear camber.

TIP: When you do a rear wheel alignment, you will observe adjustments for camber and toe from your alignment rack readout, and caster from your Digital Angle Tool.

There are two adjustment cams on the rear lower control arm (fig. 8). The front cam is used to adjust caster, and the rear cam is used to adjust camber. Toe is controlled by an adjustable rear toe link.


A Rear cam -- camber

B Front cam -- caster

It’s important to make the suspension checks and adjustments in the following order, to minimize having to make multiple passes.

1. Camber
2. Caster
3. Toe
4. Fine tune camber *
5. Fine tune caster *
6. Fine tune toe*
* if required


TIP: Both cams affect caster to some extent, but the rear cam affects camber about eight times as much as it affects caster. This is why you should set camber first, then caster.
 

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More figures.
 

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Gm Oil Life Monitoring System

http://www.gm.com/company/gmability/environment/news_issues/news/simplified_maintenance_040104.html

GMOLS GMOL oillife oillifeindicator indicator GMOLMS oillifemonitoring

GM's Simplified Vehicle Maintenance Can Save Consumers Time & Money
3000-Mile Oil Changes May be Unnecessary

Frequently Asked Questions on GM Oil Life System & Simplified Maintenance

How frequently should drivers change their engine oil? Most technicians will say 3,000 miles while others say 5,000 or 7,000. But ask Mr. Goodwrench and he'll offer a simple solution - let your vehicle tell you when - that could protect your wallet and the environment from unnecessary oil changes. GM's patented Oil Life System (GMOLS) can double or even triple the time between oil changes when compared to the common 3,000-mile recommendation simply by evaluating driving conditions.

"This car care season, most owners of 2004 GM vehicles won't have to worry about deciding when to change their engine oil because leading-edge technology will determine the right time for them," said Peter Lord, executive director, GM Service Operations. "Simply visit your GM Goodwrench dealership for an oil change service when the vehicle signals and you won't have to worry about how many miles you have driven. This alone could save consumers significantly on the number of oil changes they purchase over the life of the vehicle."

GMOLS is on about 95 percent of the vehicles that GM produces today and on a wide variety of models since the mid-1990's. There are roughly 20 million vehicles on the road today equipped with GMOLS. The system itself uses an algorithm that tracks engine revolutions and temperature and predicts oil life based on these parameters and driver use.

GM's New Simplified Maintenance Schedules Challenge Industry Assumptions

GMOLS technology allows GM and GM Goodwrench dealerships to offer all new Simplified Maintenance Schedules on most 2004 vehicles to simplify maintenance for GM customers and to build long-lasting customer relationships. The new schedules are a departure from the typical industry approach of basing maintenance intervals on mileage. Instead of a complicated list of different services to be performed at different mileage intervals, GM's new Simplified Maintenance Schedules are based on the change oil light/message.

The first time the message on the dash appears, GM Goodwrench dealerships will offer a Maintenance I service package which includes an oil and filter change, a four-tire rotation, visual inspections of the fluid levels and brakes and a resetting of the system. The next time the message appears a Maintenance II service package is recommended, which includes everything in Maintenance I, plus a professional inspection of the suspension and steering components and the transmission. After the first two visits drivers will alternate between the two schedules as the prompt appears on the dash for the life of the vehicle. Since the system must be reset to work properly and many of the required maintenance services can be complex, GM recommends taking GMOLS-equipped vehicles to the GM experts at Goodwrench dealerships for proper service.

"Simplified Maintenance Schedules are a major convenience to drivers because it takes the guesswork out of when to change oil and it eliminates the need to make decisions regarding routine maintenance," Lord said. "Basically, when the light comes on you bring the vehicle in for maintenance and the technician can perform an oil change along with other necessary maintenance items such as checking belts, rotating tires and changing the air filter."

When used as intended and linked with the Simplified Maintenance Schedules offered by GM Goodwrench dealerships, GMOLS also can provide an environmental benefit, said Lord. If the more than 20 million vehicles on the road equipped with this technology all used the system as intended, hundreds of millions of gallons of oil would be saved, eliminating the chance of this oil ever entering the environment, he added.

Consumers should check their owner's manual to determine if their GM vehicle has GMOLS. If it does, a GM Goodwrench dealership can service and reset the system at the vehicle's next oil change. If it doesn't, they should follow the oil change recommendations listed in their owner's manual. The engine oil and filter must be changed at least once a year even if the GMOLS indicator does not come on.
GM Oil Life System & Simplified Maintenance
Frequently Asked Questions



Oil Life Monitoring System

How does the system work?
The GMOLS system is not a mileage counter. It is actually a computer based software algorithm that determines when to change oil based on engine operating conditions. There is no actual oil condition sensor. Rather, the computer continuously monitors engine-operating conditions to determine when to change oil. Over the years, millions of test miles have been accumulated to calibrate the system for a variety of vehicles. The system was first introduced in 1988 and is now on more than 18 million GM vehicles.

What makes it so simple?
GM engineers have been studying oil life for decades and they've learned that oil tends to degrade in a predictable pattern. Engine oil forms a coating on the moving parts of the vehicle's engine to protect against friction and heat damage related to combustion. But over time, that protection can be damaged by several factors. High operating temperatures can cause oxidation while cold engine operation introduces contamination to the oil.

Taking many short trips is more harmful to the oil than highway driving, because it tends to introduce moisture when the engine doesn't reach full operating temperature before being shut off. Heavy use like trailer towing or prolonged driving in very hot conditions can lead to a thickening of the oil that prevents it from adequately coating engine parts. GM engineers took this knowledge of operating parameters and oil life and built a mathematical model that is run by the car's powertrain control computer. The Oil Life System monitors engine temperature, combustion events and other parameters to gauge the oil's life.

How do I operate the system?
The GMOLS is very easy to use. First, refer to the vehicle owner's manual for a description of the specific 'change oil' message and instructions for resetting the system. When the engine has been operating the appropriate amount, the 'change oil' message will be illuminated on the instrument panel or driver information center when the vehicle is first started. An oil change should be done within 600 miles from when the message was first displayed. Immediately after the oil has been changed, the system must be reset. After resetting, the 'change oil' display will no longer be displayed after engine start up.


How many miles can I expect to go between oil changes when using this system?
The beauty of the GMOLS is that it will automatically adjust the oil change interval based engine characteristics, driving habits and the climate in which the vehicle is operated. For instance, mild highway driving in a warm climate will maximize the interval between oil changes. Depending on the vehicle, this could be in excess of 7000 miles and as high as 12,000 miles. On the other hand, short trip driving in cold a climate may limit the oil change to 3000 miles or less. In general, most people that drive a combination of city and highway find that the GMOLS will indicate an oil change every 5000 to 6000 miles. Additionally, most people maintain consistent driving habits. Therefore, their mileage between oil changes will be consistent. Changes in climate will affect this somewhat.

What happens if I change oil and forget to reset the system?
Since the GMOLS does not actually sense oil condition, it is important that the engine computer knows when an oil change takes place. By enabling the reset (read owner's manual for instructions), it lets the computer know an oil change has taken place. In the event that an oil change is done without resetting the system, the 'change oil' indicator will remain illuminated until the system is reset. The more miles that are driven without the system being reset, the more inaccurate the GMOLS will be. If more than 500 miles have been driven after an oil change without resetting the GMOLS, the oil change interval should be defaulted back to 3000 miles. After the oil has been changed and the system reset, normal use of the system can be resumed.

I change my oil every 3,000 miles, so of what use is this system?
You can continue to change your oil every 3,000 miles if you so choose, but remember to reset the system after changing the oil or you will get a false "change oil" message. Also, remember that the GMOLS will allow you the ability to extend the mileage between changes without harming your engine. This will save you time and money as well as helping to protect the environment by minimizing the amount of used oil. And, if you took your vehicle to your GM Goodwrench dealer they could inspect your vehicle, reset the system and make it easier to have your vehicle properly maintained in the future.

Do I have to use special oil?
The GM Oil Life System calibrates the vehicle's needs based on use of the standard factory-fill mineral-based automotive engine oil that displays the "Starburst" API® Certification Mark. Make sure to read the vehicle's Owner's Manual to select oil with the viscosity and grade that are correct for your engine. Synthetic oils are not required except for the models that came with synthetic oil from the factory.

You've had OLM for years. Why hasn't my dealer told me about it and why all the fuss now?
As you can imagine, when changing from a 35-year-old traditional approach that is marketed by some very large companies, people will resist the change. Until the 2004 model year GMOLS was only available on select vehicles. Since the system was only on select vehicles it's been a little difficult for dealers to fully explain to customers so they stayed with the conservative approach. By putting it on the majority of the portfolio and simplifying the maintenance schedules we believe the benefits to the consumer and environment make this a change worth talking about.

The oil change service station recommends that I change oil every 3000 miles. Why should I not believe them?
The 3000-mile oil change is very conservative approach to maintaining your vehicle. It is based off an oil performance rating that was introduced in 1968. Since then, there have been many advancements made in both engine and oil technology. These advancements, in conjunction with using the GMOLS, allow engine oil drain intervals to be increased without risking harm to your the engine.

What should I do if I suspect my engine is leaking coolant into the oil?
Use of the GMOLS should be suspended until the engine has been repaired and the engine no longer leaks coolant.

I change my own oil, should I reset the system myself?
You can per the vehicle owner's manual, or ask your selling dealer.

Will I damage the car if I don't get the oil changed soon after the light comes on?
As stated in the owner's manual, it is recommended that oil be changed within two fuel tank fill-ups. Owner's manuals for newer vehicles recommend changing oil within 600 miles of the light turning on.

Do I have to check my oil level now that my vehicle is equipped with the GMOLS?
Yes, the system does not sense oil level. As stated in the owner's manual, it is recommended that you check your oil every time you stop for gasoline.

Will I void my warranty if I don't go by the GMOLS?
Complying with the owner's manual recommendations will maintain the warranty.

I had my oil changed recently and now my GMOLS light came on.
If the system was not reset (refer to owner's manual) at the time of oil change, the system can be reset as long as it's been less than 500 miles since the last oil change. If this mileage has been exceeded, change the oil at 3000 miles and reset system.

I prefer to have my oil changed still around 3,500 miles, what should I do?
You can continue to change your oil every 3,500 miles if you so choose, but remember to reset the system after changing the oil or you will get a false "change oil" message. Also, remember that the GMOLS will allow you the ability to extend the mileage between changes without harming your engine. This will save you time and money as well as helping to protect the environment by minimizing the amount of used oil. And, if you took your vehicle to your GM Goodwrench dealer they could inspect your vehicle, reset the system and make it easier to have your vehicle properly maintained in the future.

My oil seems dirty, I have 6,000 miles and no light, do I have a problem?
Discoloration will take place under normal conditions depending on driving conditions. Refer to owner's manual.
...
Also some really good information available in this thread:
http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=26859
 

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Simplified Maintenance Schedules

Simplified Maintenance Schedules
What is the potential impact of this new maintenance schedule program on a dealership's profitability/revenues?
By simplifying the owner's responsibility to maintain their vehicle at their GM dealership, this will result in better overall service loyalty, which can have a positive impact on dealership profitability.

Why should a customer follow the Simplified Maintenance schedules, instead of "traditional" maintenance schedules?
The new schedules make it easier and more cost effective for consumers to obtain required maintenance from their GM Goodwrench dealer. They simplify the decision about when to have oil changed because GMOLS notifies the driver. The new schedules also allow customers to have all of their routine maintenance completed in one simple visit, saving them time. By reducing the number of oil changes, consumers may also save money.

Are customers now required to bring their vehicle into a GM dealership for routine maintenance?
No. However, GM Goodwrench dealerships are best equipped to meet GM vehicle owner's needs for comprehensive maintenance, service and GM Parts and the new Simplified Maintenance schedules make it easier than ever to obtain this expertise.

Why should a customer follow Simplified Maintenance schedules, instead of "ala-carte" maintenance?
The new schedules make it easier and more cost effective for consumers to obtain required maintenance from their GM Goodwrench dealer. They simplify a consumer decision about when to have oil changed because GMOLS notifies the consumer. The new schedules also allow customers to have all of their routine maintenance completed in one simple visit, saving them time. By reducing the number of oil changes, consumers may also save money.

Can independents provide the service requirements of Simplified Maintenance?
Customers can choose to have an independent service shop perform their required maintenance. However, it is recommended that these services are performed by GM Goodwrench technicians, who are trained and equipped to meet GM vehicle owner's needs for comprehensive maintenance, service and they use only genuine GM Parts.
 
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