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After studying Shadofax's great list, I'm curious about something. Would anyone want to venture a somewhat intelligent guess as to the number and/or percentage of GXP coupes that are still new---say with less than 100 miles as an arbitrary number. Thanks! gjcfishf
 

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After studying Shadofax's great list, I'm curious about something. Would anyone want to venture a somewhat intelligent guess as to the number and/or percentage of GXP coupes that are still new---say with less than 100 miles as an arbitrary number. Thanks! gjcfishf
I thought they were still considered new if they had never been titled? Like a demo. or any other car a dealer has that has miles, that are added to the warranty when sold. They use to call them Brass Hat Specials, back when I bought my 70 Trans Am. My coupe has never been titled, but it has more miles then 100.
LJ
 

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Yeah, once they are purchased they aren't new any more.

Once in the hands of an owner, they always get at least some miles put on them, except for the odd fool that thinks they'll be able to retire when they make the killing selling the car with only 20 miles on it in 20 years.
 

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They are at least 4 yrs old, now?! If you own it, it ain't a new car anymore...it is used. Am I wrong in thinking that if the car is going to someday be a collector car and worth some big money, won't we all be dead by then?!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not trying for "new" definition

Guys, I wasn't trying to start a debate on the definition of "new". What fascinated me was the number of coupes listed in Shadofax's list as "New". If I interpret that correctly, there were far more coupes purchased and "garaged away" than I ever thought. My personal GXP coupe has 3K, has always been garaged, and is "like-new". I'm just looking for someone who has a much better feel for it than I, to venture a guess as to how many are out there that are "essentially" new. As stated, I just said less than 100 miles as a strictly arbitrary number. Thanks, Gary
 

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After studying Shadofax's great list, I'm curious about something. Would anyone want to venture a somewhat intelligent guess as to the number and/or percentage of GXP coupes that are still new---say with less than 100 miles as an arbitrary number. Thanks! gjcfishf
None

The instant they were placed in service they became used vehicles.:thumbs::grouphug::thumbs:
 

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Odds are a few people squirreled a few away (for whatever reason), but if a car is stored there's no legal reason it has to be registered. Titled yes, yearly registration no. Which means there's no way to verify how many have been wrapped in a plastic bubble and stored away with low miles. But I'd consider a vintage car "new" if the criteria is based on mileage and condition. Meaning it wasn't wrecked on the way home from the dealership and parked.


Last weekend's Lambrecht Chevrolet auction brought 15,000 people and TV's "Top Gear" to a small Nebraska town, where nearly 500 Chevrolets mostly from the 1950s, '60s and '70s were auctioned off to the tune of an estimated $2.8 million.

The vehicles were the unsold inventory of Lambrecht Chevrolet, which closed in 1996 after 50 years. The vintage cars attracted attention from as far away as Brazil, Thailand and Europe since the auction was announced in June.

The Pierce County Sheriff's Office estimated the crowd at around 15,000, including 3,000 on-site bidders. An additional 3,300 placed bids for the vehicles online.


Several more vids on YT showing the vast number that was auctioned off, definitely worth viewing if you enjoy seeing old cars.
 

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I do! But thanks so much for your thoughtful response, Sleepy.
You have managed to step into a well understood hole in the continuity of forum discussion.

99% of members are happy to enjoy their cars from the perspective that they are a useful, enjoyable tool that is meant to be consumed. Cared for, maintained and in many cases coddled to extend their useful lives far into the future, but still basically a consumer item with limited intrinsic value beyond being a very nice car.

1% view their cars as investments and are deferring their consumption of their car into some indeterminant future time when they believe that by deferring their consumption they may realize a significant profit based on that deferral.

Both positions are equally valid and everyone is free to enjoy their cars as they choose.

A significant minority of the 99% view deferral of consumption as a form of insanity. They believe that in the end, the period of time required to actually realize a profit is so long and the potential for actual profit is so small that such deferral is not a rational investment course of action.

A small percentage of the 1% tend to come across as . .. egalitarian. They appear to be considering that they are the only ones who have the knowledge and intelligence to realize that deferring consumption is a really great financial investment.

The arguments on both sides are well entrenched and firm. No negotiating is in the offing.

You just succeeded in pulling off an unhealed scab.

I am ok with either position. Time will tell and most of us will not be around to find out the outcome . . . :grouphug:
 

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Odds are a few people squirreled a few away (for whatever reason), but if a car is stored there's no legal reason it has to be registered. Titled yes, yearly registration no. Which means there's no way to verify how many have been wrapped in a plastic bubble and stored away with low miles. But I'd consider a vintage car "new" if the criteria is based on mileage and condition. Meaning it wasn't wrecked on the way home from the dealership and parked.


Last weekend's Lambrecht Chevrolet auction brought 15,000 people and TV's "Top Gear" to a small Nebraska town, where nearly 500 Chevrolets mostly from the 1950s, '60s and '70s were auctioned off to the tune of an estimated $2.8 million.

The vehicles were the unsold inventory of Lambrecht Chevrolet, which closed in 1996 after 50 years. The vintage cars attracted attention from as far away as Brazil, Thailand and Europe since the auction was announced in June.

The Pierce County Sheriff's Office estimated the crowd at around 15,000, including 3,000 on-site bidders. An additional 3,300 placed bids for the vehicles online.

Lambrecht Chevrolet Auction Sneak Peek - YouTube

Several more vids on YT showing the vast number that was auctioned off, definitely worth viewing if you enjoy seeing old cars.
I do not know the sales numbers but on average $2.8 M divided by 500 cars yields an average sale price of $5600. If they sold for an average of $2500 new, then they doubled in price at auction. Subtract auction fees of ~ 15% you end up with something on the order of doubling the sale price.

Extrapolating that to the Solstice, with a price of ~$30k a return of ~$30k is a "profit" of about 100%. After 50 years.

So if the average owner is 45? when they are 95 they might see a profit. :devil:
 

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My guess is less than 10%?
 

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The reason I posted the Lambrecht auction was mainly to show it was a anomaly. The vehicles fetching the highest prices either had low-mileage or were a recognizable collectible or a perceived value was connected to the vehicle up to and including nostalgic value. Also, I believe it's the rare individual who purchases a brand new car in order to store it away. I won't hazard a guess as to why some people do things like that because I think everyone has a little crazy in them. Nevertheless, if I was alive in 25 years and read about a Pontiac Solstice being offered for sale that had been purchased new and stored away and had 10 to ? less miles on it I'd consider it new car. Not new in the sense it just rolled off the assembly line, but new in that it was never used. I don't want to bring up value because I don't think that's the question. The question is about how many low-mileage coupes are around. A question that unfortunately can't be answered. Were engaging in mental masturbation, pointless but enjoyable to some. :lol:
 

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The reason I posted the Lambrecht auction was mainly to show it was a anomaly. The vehicles fetching the highest prices either had low-milage or were a recognizable collectible (or both). I believe it's the rare individual who purchases a brand new car in order to store away. I won't hazard a guess as to why some people do things because I think everyone is a little crazy. Nevertheless, if I was alive in 25 years and read about a Pontiac Solstice being offered for sale that had been purchased new and stored away and had 10 or less miles on I'd consider it new. I don't want to bring up value because I don't think that's the question. The question is about how many low-mileage coupes are around. A question that can't be answered.
I cannot find fault with your logic. In fact, I totally agree!:agree::agree::agree:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks, Rob

Thanks, Rob, for your rather erudite post. While I don't disagree with your assessment of the board dynamics, I hope you haven't taking the liberty of placing me in either one of your camps. I simply find it offensive on ANY board, for a small group of members to demean someone's post, simply because they have no interest in the question or the material. Often these same members wonder why more people don't participate in the Forum. Well----duh! When someone---especially someone new---goes to the trouble to write a legitimate post, either respond in a helpful, well-intentioned manner or simply move on if you have no interest. Pretty simple!
 

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What fascinated me was the number of coupes listed in Shadofax's list as "New".
That means they were acquired by their current owner as either "New" or "Used" (the current owner is not the original owner). It has nothing to do with the current condition or mileage of the car. A car with 100,000 miles on it NOW could be shown as "New" on Shadofax's list because the current owner bought it new at some point.
 

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I believe the OP was hoping to have the owners of the coupe in the list, to post what mileage they presently have.
Trying to make a guess is just that a guess.
 

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I do believe there are still some coupes on dealer lots with nutty high prices that were never titled, so would qualify as "new."

As to the collector stuff, time will tell. But, clearly values are dropping every year, but perhaps that will turn around some day. Perhaps good GXP manual coupes will hold steady at some point as they are the rarest and most sought after, but quite unlikely they'll keep up with even the simplest investment and cost of inflation over a long time period.
 

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Back to the original poster's question, there are a few very low mileage 'Sunday if it is sunny' kind of cars out there, and a whole lot more like mine that get relatively low usage (I've just gone over 6,000 in 4 years, but that's because I drive my other cars much of the year).

These cars seem to have been largely bought as second cars and see less use than a run of the mill Honda Civic commuter car.

You have to watch the equation often touted, that low miles = high value. The best car is one that has been used at least regularly. I've helped out with one of these garage queens that were literally put in storage after purchase and never run. Had to rebuild the complete brake system, the cooling system, wake up all the electrics that had 'gone to sleep'...... I find that in my cars, if I use them every year, far less goes wrong with them than if I leave them in storage for several years (which I sometimes have to do as I have only finite time to play with them).

I think your question was a fair one, once you explained it - these cars do seem to have lower mileages on them than many.
 
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