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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Huddle around kids and i'll let me tell you a tale of my cooling system wooes.

Thermostat A = aftermarket, car overheats, air from cooling fan is cold but when tested in a pot of water it opens at 180f
Thermostat B = ac delco, car can't heat up past 140f, pressure filled the cooling system with a compressor, when tested in a pot of water it opens at 140f and the seal leaks around the plunger
Thermostat C = replacement ac delco with tiny hole drilled on the side, vacuum filled the cooling system, car overheats, air from cooling fan is cold, but when tested in a pot of water it opens at 180f
Thermostat D = took thermostat A and took out the rubber seal around the plunger and exposed a bunch for holes for coolant to flow when its closed, pressure filled the system with a compressor, air from cooling fan is hot, car heats up and cools down just fine, problem solved!

So you see kids, speed holes in the thermostat = good! Even the vacuum filling tool didn't solve the problem, unbelievable. Kudos to gm for forgetting about the cooling system until the car was being put together on the assembly line.

I got the thermostat replacement down to an hour 馃槀

111640

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Very similar to my experience. I ended up drilling two 1/8" holes in my tstat and it solved my air bubble problem. Once you get the hose clamp turned out of the way, changing tstats is a piece of cake.
 

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I used the vacuum and DDM method.....about 8 times to get all the air out. And I would run it in between to heat it up to allow the thermostat to open to aid in the air release. Next time, I'll do the work and send it to the dealer for a flush and fill....hahahahahaha
 
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Having trouble bleeding out my system as well.
My long time mechanic friend is telling me not to drill holes., is this the final consensus or do you still recommend i do it?

My vacuum bleeder should be here tomorrow. Already have the old thermostat out, and the replacement ready to go in.
 

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I did not drill holes. It took me about a total of 5 hours to get mine bled with a power vacuum. Good luck!
 

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TO DRILL OR NOT TO DRILL....... I could be all wrong here but the hole makes a big difference in being able to bleed the air out of the system. (at least in my case). As to the temperature regulation, it seems that the thermostat, technically, would open a little less to compensate for the hole and still maintain its designed temperature range. When I drilled mine, the thermostat still regulated the temp. to the same as before drilling.
 

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Just get the correct tool and this job is a non-issue. If you are using a screwdriver as a wrench, the problem is not the bolt.
 

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The problem is that the bolt on the kappa has a left-handed thread.
Doesn't that just mean that you have to turn it a different direction?
 

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The issue is people trying to refill their systems without the correct $60 tool. If you evacuate the system first, then introduce coolant, there is no air to be trapped. That is how the system was designed to be refilled. Not by drilling random holes in parts of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The issue is people trying to refill their systems without the correct $60 tool. If you evacuate the system first, then introduce coolant, there is no air to be trapped. That is how the system was designed to be refilled. Not by drilling random holes in parts of it.
I did that... didn't work.
 

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The issue is people trying to refill their systems without the correct $60 tool. If you evacuate the system first, then introduce coolant, there is no air to be trapped. That is how the system was designed to be refilled. Not by drilling random holes in parts of it.
The holes drilled are not random. They are drilled into a specific part of the thermostat to serve a specific purpose and they work. many cooling systems in all sorts of applications require bypass holes in the thermostats and are supplied with predrilled thermostats.
 

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I did that... didn't work.
You cannot change the laws of physics: If all the air is evacuated and you introduce only coolant, there is no way air can be trapped in the system.

If you have a leak that draws air into the vacuum before you fill with coolant that would cause a problem, but that's not a system design issue, it's repair issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You cannot change the laws of physics: If all the air is evacuated and you introduce only coolant, there is no way air can be trapped in the system.

If you have a leak that draws air into the vacuum before you fill with coolant that would cause a problem, but that's not a system design issue, it's repair issue.
It's gotta be...



I tried like 5 times with the stock thermostat and the vacuum tool, but as soon as I used the modded one it stopped overheating 馃し馃徏鈥嶁檪锔
 

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The issue is people trying to refill their systems without the correct $60 tool. If you evacuate the system first, then introduce coolant, there is no air to be trapped. That is how the system was designed to be refilled. Not by drilling random holes in parts of it.
The tool was all it took for me. Only one try, 300 miles later no overheating. Had I needed to replace the thermostat I probably would have drilled the whole but not necessary in my case.
 

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The tool was all it took for me. Only one try, 300 miles later no overheating. Had I needed to replace the thermostat I probably would have drilled the whole but not necessary in my case.
I just tried the tool now and now luck... still overheats, heater is still blowing cold. although when i pulled vacuum and tried to fill there was a left over -5 psi in the system. Could that be because the system was 100 percent cold overnight? and possibly the thermostat is not opening?

also, the driver side of the radiator hose and radiator itself is cool to the touch. the main return hose feels like its filled with hot steam. still sound like air in the system?

Letting it cool now and going to try again shortly
 
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