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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The pics I've seen of the original concept coupes in 2002 have nicer lines than the production cars. Hard to put my finger on it, but I think it's a combination of a slightly more angled windshield and a broader stance.
I'm taking delivery on a Brazen Orange coupe this weekend, and I'm already thinking what I could do to give this car a look more reminiscent of the 2002 concept. Fender flairs? Wider wheels and tires? Has anyone tried this?
Here's some pics if you haven't already seen it.
2002 Pontiac Solstice Coupe concept photo
 

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The pics I've seen of the original concept coupes in 2002 have nicer lines than the production cars. Hard to put my finger on it, but I think it's a combination of a slightly more angled windshield and a broader stance.
I'm taking delivery on a Brazen Orange coupe this weekend, and I'm already thinking what I could do to give this car a look more reminiscent of the 2002 concept. Fender flairs? Wider wheels and tires? Has anyone tried this?
Here's some pics if you haven't already seen it.
2002 Pontiac Solstice Coupe concept photo
While I like the concept, I like our real car. The front lights are nicely designed in the factory version, the concept body really seems to be low on the tires, factory is not so, so you'd want to lower your ride some for that.
 

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What I notice right away are the bigger headlights, production windshield, larger concept wheels, side mirrors, door handles, body-to-wheel gap, elimination & integration of the coupes B pillar, and the treatment of the fastback and rear fascia for the production coupe.

From the Solstice book.

Ken Parkinson, Director of Small and Car Exterior Design (2001).
"When you do a car as a concept, you'd think it would be a pretty easy transition to production. But it took a lot of hard work to capture the essence of that design, because every surface, every line, every detail had to change to make it producible."

Wayne Cherry, Global Design Vice President (2001)
The studio modeled two iterations of the Solstice--one with the eventual width aof the production car but another version that was quite a bit narrower. The narrow version also had smaller wheels, the thought being to make the car lighter and more compact. This became a big deal, says Cherry, and an important turning point in the car's development. Ultimately, in side-by-side comparisons, most people favored the wider car.

"We did a quick study of a narrower width," Ken Parkinson says, "and it just didn't capture the look of the showcar. Once everyone saw what it meant to the look and the theme, the team, both engineering and design really rallied to get it back on track, get the width where it needed to be and resolve the mass issue in a different way."

Franz Von Holzhausen (concept designer) proudly points out that the wheelbase, overall width and front and rear tracks are identical to the concept's, and so are the bumper off-sets.

Ken Parkinson remembers standing in front of the production prototype when it was introduced at the 2004 Detroit North American Auto Show, just tow years after the concept's debut. "We had it sitting on on the floor with a rope around it," he recalls, "and someone from the media cam up and asked where the Solstice was. I said, "Right here." He said, "No way, that's the showcar. Where's the production car? I said, "No, this is the production car." Just having an auto press person, someone who's in tune with the industry, say he couldn't tell he was looking at a production car, believing it was the showcar--that, to me, was a huge bonus.
 

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unless you are intent on keeping it forever you should consider that in most cases every dollar you spend on mods is one you will also deduct from the price when its time to sell.that being said,save the original parts in case you decide stock was better after all.but im not trying to rain on your parade,its your car.have fun with it and welcome to the permagrin...
 

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Just my 2 cents: Out of all the Solstices produced the real collector cars will be the coupes and Club Racer package with the rest following hopefully at some point in time (20 years from now?) By adding a set of aftermarket wheels , springs or coilovers or any item which can be easily removed and the car being able to be put back to stock you should not hurt the value .Start adding flares or major body mods plan on taking a big hit when you go to sell it .Most people are leery of buying a modded car unless they know the owner or the person has documentation to back up his changes I know I have sold a few modded cars in my time..I love the Kappa's with the LS conversions you would think that they would hold up in value but every one I have seen that has sold is going for less then half of what the guy or gal has into it . Yes there are exceptions to the rule hot rods being a glaring example but in this case with so little of these cars produced a well kept stock one is going to bring in much more money then one that has been modified .My car is modified to the point that it would be impractical to put it back to stock but I'm not planning to ever sell it I just enjoy it and want it to be different then your average Solstice and when it gets to that point I let my heirs worry about it .
 

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Most of the time, I think the concept car looks better than the production car. In my opinion, the pontiac solstice is the rare exception. I think that the production model turned out way better than the concept, and I really liked the concept.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
For me, I think the lower rake of the windshield and the more pronounced curves from front to rear make the concept look better.
Probably does have something to do with making the car "produceable" as was noted earlier.
In any case, I absolutely love my coupe. It's a damn nice looking car.
 
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